• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Right side bloat=death

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

Guest
I am asking about this for a friend in Litchfield, NE. He has recently lost 3-4 400-500# calves due to bloating of the large and small intestines, right side bloating. The animals could not belch or pass the gas. The animals were back grounded. They had free access to salt block and granular 12/12 minerals. According to the vet and nutritionist he has been working with, feed and grain are in proper rations. The vet and nutritionist both also stated that the animals feed needed to stay in the stomach longer.<br>Any information would be greatly appreciated.<br>
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
(User Above)":j30zd6ce said:
: I am asking about this for a friend in Litchfield, NE. He has recently lost 3-4 400-500# calves due to bloating of the large and small intestines, right side bloating. The animals could not belch or pass the gas. The animals were back grounded. They had free access to salt block and granular 12/12 minerals. According to the vet and nutritionist he has been working with, feed and grain are in proper rations. The vet and nutritionist both also stated that the animals feed needed to stay in the stomach longer.<br>: Any information would be greatly appreciated.<p>I am assuming that the 3-4 dead animals were only a fraction of the animals on feed and that the rest are doing fine. We had a strange similar situation happen this past year as well. We lost a young bull (on farm test) after a couple of months (don't have the data in front of me) into the test. I think he was close to 900-1000 lbs. He was fine one morning/afternoon & dead bloated large the next morning. The post mort revealed nothing unusual, but the inability to belch/relieve gas. The vet could only figure that a freak grass/hay plug must have been the cause. He said that death from bloating can occur in only hours. We were really concerned because we were using a different ration (which the vet & supplier said should not have caused a problem) than in the past and wanted to rule out acidosis (?sp) or other overeating death causes. So far all other animals are doing fine. Ours have access to minerals & hay as well. Just thought I would share this story with you - maybe your friend's had "Murphy" (Murphy's law) visiting his farm. 2000 was a strange year for us - several unusual things happening. 2001 is doing better, still some weird things - maybe it follows the cattle cycle too? Best of Luck. Hopefully someone else has a solution for your friend.
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Fines in the feed will cause bloat, very tiny particles of high protien or energy feed. ie grain or alfalfa leaves. The small particles ferment very quickly and cause a build-up of gas in the rumen. Once the pressure gets to much the animals can't belch to relieve the further build-up.<p>Remedy is to use more consistant size of feed, if fines are a constant problem, then molasses or oil (feed grade vegtable)can be added to mix the fines throughout the ration. Another option is to slow down the gain, reduce the protien/energy of the ration. A bit of straw or grass hay will work.<p>Jason Trowbridge<br>Southern Angus Farms<br>Alberta Canada
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
(User Above)":1xv24mlz said:
: : I am asking about this for a friend in Litchfield, NE. He has recently lost 3-4 400-500# calves due to bloating of the large and small intestines, right side bloating. The animals could not belch or pass the gas. The animals were back grounded. They had free access to salt block and granular 12/12 minerals. According to the vet and nutritionist he has been working with, feed and grain are in proper rations. The vet and nutritionist both also stated that the animals feed needed to stay in the stomach longer.<br>: : Any information would be greatly appreciated.<p>: I am assuming that the 3-4 dead animals were only a fraction of the animals on feed and that the rest are doing fine. We had a strange similar situation happen this past year as well. We lost a young bull (on farm test) after a couple of months (don't have the data in front of me) into the test. I think he was close to 900-1000 lbs. He was fine one morning/afternoon & dead bloated large the next morning. The post mort revealed nothing unusual, but the inability to belch/relieve gas. The vet could only figure that a freak grass/hay plug must have been the cause. He said that death from bloating can occur in only hours. We were really concerned because we were using a different ration (which the vet & supplier said should not have caused a problem) than in the past and wanted to rule out acidosis (?sp) or other overeating death causes. So far all other animals are doing fine. Ours have access to minerals & hay as well. Just thought I would share this story with you - maybe your friend's had "Murphy" (Murphy's law) visiting his farm. 2000 was a strange year for us - several unusual things happening. 2001 is doing better, still some weird things - maybe it follows the cattle cycle too? Best of Luck. Hopefully someone else has a solution for your friend.<p>Hi<p>I had 3 calves die on me from souring and then Bloating, had to tube them every two hours. No body new what was going on with them. The forth one was going done. I took a sample of feces over to the Collage Lad. The tests results were that they had Stonglye worms and a very high count. We gave it a shot of Ironec Plus and it is now doing fine. Hope this might help you.<p>
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


[email protected]
 

Latest posts

Top