Poisonous Plants

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TheBullLady

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Thanks for the link Bill! Very interesting, but scary too! I didn't realize there were so many toxic plants to cattle. :shock:
 

dun

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TheBullLady":2iuf28s6 said:
Thanks for the link Bill! Very interesting, but scary too! I didn't realize there were so many toxic plants to cattle. :shock:

Toxicity while a real problem isn't as bad as you might be inclined to believe. In most cases it takes a pretty good amount of something to be seriously toxic. Alos cows have tendency to avoid unfamiliar feeds. Unless they learn to eat it as youngsters or exposed to conditions where the tocxic plants are most of what they need to eat, it isn't as severe a problem.
Ours will nip at a horse nettle then a little pig weed then a little oak scrub but their predominant diet is still grass and clover.
That said, you still need to eliminate if possible or at the minimum seriously decrease the availability. Every once in a while an idiot rolls around that will eat just about anything with no discrimination.

dun
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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We keep weeds mowed in our pastures, hopefully before the annuals go to seed. Our biggest violators are Russian Thistle (aka sagebrush), Pigweed, some kind of 2' tall stiff stemmed flower/weed with white flowers. Thistle and Pigweed can contribute to nitrate poisoning if there is nothing else to eat.

Anyone have any practical suggestions to eliminate grass burs in a pasture? Pre-emergent herbicide? If so, what type, and any restrictions for grazing?

Thanks
 

dun

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PLR":2prq7ft8 said:
OK SINCE WHEN HAS ALFALFA BEEN TOXIC TO COWS????


This I just don't get.

Shelby

Maybe because of the possibiliyt of bloat.
Dictionary definition of "toxic":
Capable of causing injury or death, especially by chemical means; poisonous

dun
 

PLR

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Well if thats the case then they had better get out their botany books and start listing every plant they find because all are capable of causeing injury or death. things like carrots Ya eat too many carrots and you are going to be in pain. But it is a good site for the really toxic plants like nightshade, camas, dock, and others that you should be aware of. What amazed me is they didn't have potatoes tomatoes or eggplant. All very toxic to humans and livestock.

Shelby
 
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Running Arrow Bill

Running Arrow Bill

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PLR":30539qq7 said:
Well if thats the case then they had better get out their botany books and start listing every plant they find because all are capable of causeing injury or death. things like carrots Ya eat too many carrots and you are going to be in pain. But it is a good site for the really toxic plants like nightshade, camas, dock, and others that you should be aware of. What amazed me is they didn't have potatoes tomatoes or eggplant. All very toxic to humans and livestock.

Shelby

True. However, people usually try to keep their livestock out of their vegetable gardens...lol.
 

Mike H

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Bill,
I am sure you already know why we have grass burs in pasture. Poor soil fertility and lack of competition. A non chemical approach though somewhat expensive is to soil test and obtain a high soil fertility and let the cattle graze the burrs and reduce burr formation. A significant reduction rather than elimination may be more appropriate description. This is the same approach used in home lawns and though it takes time it works.
Last year I use Oasis, Plateau, Cadre all contain the same active ingredient at the 2 oz/ac rate and got 95% control. No grazing restrictions but at present there are label problems, I think due to complaints as people were not prepared for the loss of one cutting of hay or the lack of early available grazing.
Once a control option is selected you have to stay with it for several years.
I use Grazon P+D for thistles and pigweed and bullthistle and have decided it is worth the few extra dollars of cost per acre given the residual effect of the picloram and extended control of weeds that may not be present at the time of application. I don't have susceptible non target plants in adjacent areas which is a major consideration.

Running Arrow Bill":3fkzq7qe said:
We keep weeds mowed in our pastures, hopefully before the annuals go to seed. Our biggest violators are Russian Thistle (aka sagebrush), Pigweed, some kind of 2' tall stiff stemmed flower/weed with white flowers. Thistle and Pigweed can contribute to nitrate poisoning if there is nothing else to eat.

Anyone have any practical suggestions to eliminate grass burs in a pasture? Pre-emergent herbicide? If so, what type, and any restrictions for grazing?

Thanks
 

ga. prime

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I used Cadre this past year on a limited trial basis. It was fairly expensive; about $18/acre ,if I remember correctly ,just for the chemical. I agree with MIke H that it was about 95% effective. The big drawback was that it stunted my Bermuda grass for several weeks. This Herbicide also kills many other kinds of grasses besides sand spurs, so you will have to carefully read the label to see if it can be safely used in your pasture.
 

ga. prime

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By the way, one of my uncle's cows choked to death while trying to swallow a pear whole. Some foods don't have to be poisonous to kill a cow.
 

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