• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

New way to weigh cattle

capparelli

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2006
Messages
69
Reaction score
0
Location
Florida

RD-Sam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
1,452
Reaction score
0
Sounds like it was only accurate within 1%, they could really screw up ratios.
 

Herefords.US

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2006
Messages
2,066
Reaction score
0
Location
North Central Texas
RD-Sam":fn2tai7n said:
Sounds like it was only accurate within 1%, they could really screw up ratios.

I don't think 1% would make that much difference in ratio accuracy. You could get that much variation depending on whether they "pooped" or not before they went across the scales.

George
 

RD-Sam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
1,452
Reaction score
0
I've been studying performance pedigrees on angus lately and most are around 100 ratio, give or take a percent, even the ones that are suppose to be high growth. High accuracy sires of course. :cowboy:
 

RD-Sam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
1,452
Reaction score
0
I'm wondering how they are taking a picture? X-ray?
 

KNERSIE

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
7,058
Reaction score
0
Location
3rd World
HerefordSire":2stpxuad said:
Is the scale correct after a pre-poop or a post-poop? :idea: :idea: :idea:

A scale is only correct on empty stomach weights, typically that means leaving them overnight in the corral without food or water to weigh them in the morning.
 

robert

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2008
Messages
824
Reaction score
0
KNERSIE":3udw436z said:
HerefordSire":3udw436z said:
Is the scale correct after a pre-poop or a post-poop? :idea: :idea: :idea:

A scale is only correct on empty stomach weights, typically that means leaving them overnight in the corral without food or water to weigh them in the morning.

I'll try and remember that next time I think I should step on a set of scales. :D
 

VLS_GUY

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2009
Messages
198
Reaction score
0
I have filled out a contact form with some questions for our device manufacturer and am awaiting a response to some questions. From what I can see (the website has little information) is that this is a device using LIDAR in a binocular (biphasic ?) form (two laser emitters and receivers). This set up will allow them to get a 3D image and using a 360 degree scan establish the body volume of the animal. Then it gets tricky. Are they assuming a body unit density to compute weight? I am asking them how they differentiate among animals with different tissue types such as say a fat steer versus a thin feeder. Also you must be between 10 to 15 feet distance from the animal on all points of the compass. How long this takes is not known. You animals had better be tame to make this work.
The LIDAR unit itself is housed in an expansion slot in a tablet PC. The tablet is ruggedized to some degree but not likely to the amount I would like to see. I buy laptops with expansion slots all the time and they are not cheap as far as PCs go. They cost any where from $ 4,500 to $ 9,000 with out the LIDAR unit. The sort of PC that would work here is a Switchback by Black Diamond. They cost around $ 6,500 with out the LIDAR unit that has to be packaged to go in to their custom expansion slots. The problem with the switchback is that it has a hard drive and hard drives are vulnerable to shock damage. The best unit would be a PDA with flash drive memory and custom standardized package for the LIDAR electronics.
Looking at the big picture this unit will never be accurate enough to use for legal trade. It will give readings good enough for relative weights (ratios) if the errors are relatively constant across environmental conditions and cattle types. This unit will also likely require yearly calibration and maintenance adding to its total cost.
The scale has the advantage of being able to weigh other things depending on its type and can be bought in commercial versions for commercial trade. Given the cost of the LIDAR and its host PC a scale to weight cattle can be had that is more accurate and has less technical risk
 

ANAZAZI

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2007
Messages
2,946
Reaction score
0
Location
Sweden
VLS_GUY":3447tydt said:
I have filled out a contact form with some questions for our device manufacturer and am awaiting a response to some questions. From what I can see (the website has little information) is that this is a device using LIDAR in a binocular (biphasic ?) form (two laser emitters and receivers). This set up will allow them to get a 3D image and using a 360 degree scan establish the body volume of the animal. Then it gets tricky. Are they assuming a body unit density to compute weight? I am asking them how they differentiate among animals with different tissue types such as say a fat steer versus a thin feeder. Also you must be between 10 to 15 feet distance from the animal on all points of the compass. How long this takes is not known. You animals had better be tame to make this work.
The LIDAR unit itself is housed in an expansion slot in a tablet PC. The tablet is ruggedized to some degree but not likely to the amount I would like to see. I buy laptops with expansion slots all the time and they are not cheap as far as PCs go. They cost any where from $ 4,500 to $ 9,000 with out the LIDAR unit. The sort of PC that would work here is a Switchback by Black Diamond. They cost around $ 6,500 with out the LIDAR unit that has to be packaged to go in to their custom expansion slots. The problem with the switchback is that it has a hard drive and hard drives are vulnerable to shock damage. The best unit would be a PDA with flash drive memory and custom standardized package for the LIDAR electronics.
Looking at the big picture this unit will never be accurate enough to use for legal trade. It will give readings good enough for relative weights (ratios) if the errors are relatively constant across environmental conditions and cattle types. This unit will also likely require yearly calibration and maintenance adding to its total cost.
The scale has the advantage of being able to weigh other things depending on its type and can be bought in commercial versions for commercial trade. Given the cost of the LIDAR and its host PC a scale to weight cattle can be had that is more accurate and has less technical risk


Like I said, It is hype, and nothing to take seriously.
 

Latest posts

Top