• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Need Help with an Electric Deer Fence

Help Support CattleToday:

Gators Rule

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 12, 2011
Messages
851
Reaction score
1
Location
Florida ( North South Central)
I'm in the process of needing to build an electric fence that will help keep deer out of an 70 acre cotton field, in south Georgia. I've roughly calculated the perimeter to be about 7,135 feet, or 1.35 miles. While I would like to do this as economically as possible, I also want to do it right so that this is a one time expenditure, with minimal upkeep expense in subsequent years.

What can I expect? T-posts or wood posts? If T-posts, how long should the T-posts be? Distance between posts? Type of wire? One or two chargers? Solar or electric? If we do the work our self, how much money would I expect to spend? How much if I contacted a fence builder?

Thanks in advance!

David
 

M-5

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2015
Messages
7,338
Reaction score
0
Location
AT the FLORIDA STATE line checking papers
You will not keep deer out of a field with electric fence unless you build it like the do prisons . The only way I know of keeping them out is HIGH fence and Its expensive from the folks that are in the know. my BIL has built hundreds of miles of it along the interstate.
 

Rafter S

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
4,408
Reaction score
82
Location
Grimes County, TX
M-5 is right about it needing to be high. I used to feed on weekends at a game ranch that had 6' fences. Whitetails jumped in and out whenever they wanted.
 

callmefence

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
6,893
Reaction score
96
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
To electric fences run parallel 4 foot apart is effective once deer become conditioned to it.
Not deer proof but definitely deer resistant.
This method is used very commonly in Texas on game ranches to keep deer out of food plots while they develop. I would use tpost with pipe corners . 2 wires at 2 and 4 foot and a separate charger for each fence. Be prepared to do lots of repairs at first. Rut shouldn't be a concern on cotton.
I would expect you could have it built for 2.00 per foot + chargers.

8 foot game fence 6.00
 

M.Magis

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
1,937
Reaction score
22
Location
Cambridge, Ohio
callmefence":2b9hn5um said:
To electric fences run parallel 4 foot apart is effective once deer become conditioned to it.
Not deer proof but definitely deer resistant.
This method is used very commonly in Texas on game ranches to keep deer out of food plots while they develop. I would use tpost with pipe corners . 2 wires at 2 and 4 foot and a separate charger for each fence. Be prepared to do lots of repairs at first. Rut shouldn't be a concern on cotton.
I would expect you could have it built for 2.00 per foot + chargers.

8 foot game fence 6.00
This is what I was going to suggest. Pretty common and effective with food plots. I think Ghallager website has illustrations.
 
OP
Gators Rule

Gators Rule

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 12, 2011
Messages
851
Reaction score
1
Location
Florida ( North South Central)
Thank you for the information. We are having a hard time keeping a bunch of deer from attacking the cotton after it is first planted.

6 foot T post would probably do the trick. How far would you space them?, And is there a particular type of wire that you would use?
 

callmefence

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
6,893
Reaction score
96
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
I build pretty much zero permanent electric fence. Just not used here. And this is going to be permanent I assume. So gonna talk out my azz a little bit.

Build good braces so you can pull it tight. Use 12.5 smooth high tensile wire tpost 100 feet. 50 would be better. But in this situation I think 100 would be ok. Whatever I would stagger the post on the two fences to make it more visible.

Fwiw....The deer guys usually just use a single wire on each fence around 30 ". These fence are temporary. I recommended two because your deal is a little different.
 

Farm Fence Solutions

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
2,008
Reaction score
0
Truly permanent, one shot deal......2096-12 or even 2096-24 net wire with big post spacing. Could even go with a square knot instead of fixed knot to whittle on the cost a bit. That kind of quantity, you should be able to realize a material cost of less than $1.50/ft.
 

pricefarm

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
Messages
1,540
Reaction score
10
Location
Southwest Va
Farm Fence Solutions":kvuoh3sn said:
Truly permanent, one shot deal......2096-12 or even 2096-24 net wire with big post spacing. Could even go with a square knot instead of fixed knot to whittle on the cost a bit. That kind of quantity, you should be able to realize a material cost of less than $1.50/ft.

What Is the advantages and disadvantages with square knot vs fixed knot wire ?
 

Farm Fence Solutions

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
2,008
Reaction score
0
pricefarm":dhqyxkcc said:
Farm Fence Solutions":dhqyxkcc said:
Truly permanent, one shot deal......2096-12 or even 2096-24 net wire with big post spacing. Could even go with a square knot instead of fixed knot to whittle on the cost a bit. That kind of quantity, you should be able to realize a material cost of less than $1.50/ft.

What Is the advantages and disadvantages with square knot vs fixed knot wire ?


"S" knot and Fixed knot both have a solid vertical stay wire, which makes it much stiffer than a hinge joint fence. Fixed knot is limited in roll length by the number of knots per line wire. For example, the longest fixed knot roll with 6" stay spacing we can make, is 330'. With 12" stay spacing we can go to 660'. 18" stay spacing we can go 990'. Etc etc. The fixed knot is considerably more substantial, but will get unstable in a roll that is too long. The fixed knot is quite a bit stronger, and more visible than a square knot.
The S knot is plenty strong for most applications, and we can make rolls up to around 1,700' in a 6" stay spacing. There is less wire in the S knot. Less wire = less steel = less pesos. Generally speaking, any long run (1/4 mile or better) will be a fairly low pressure area, so the cost savings is a no brainer.
Both S knot and fixed knot are suitable for increased line post spacing, since the solid vertical stay stiffens it up.
A 12" stay width fixed knot is my go to wire, but S knot definitely has it's place and we are using it more all the time.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,031
Reaction score
142
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
As soon as something jumps off the ground, it's.. well.. not grounded anymore.. so electric becomes useless.. We had a fallow deer ranch here, their fences were 8-9 feet high.. the first 5-6 feet were mesh, then a few high tensile strands on top.. not a cheap proposition, the braces to hold high tensile that high off the ground are huge!
 

callmefence

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
6,893
Reaction score
96
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
Nesikep":237py1bj said:
As soon as something jumps off the ground, it's.. well.. not grounded anymore.. so electric becomes useless.. We had a fallow deer ranch here, their fences were 8-9 feet high.. the first 5-6 feet were mesh, then a few high tensile strands on top.. not a cheap proposition, the braces to hold high tensile that high off the ground are huge!

Takes about 130feet of pipe per corner for game fence.

Electric fence for deer only 3 to 4 foot.tall

Electric fence up high is common in prison fence. Ground is supplied by the chain link they have to climb to reach it.
 

M.Magis

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
1,937
Reaction score
22
Location
Cambridge, Ohio
Here's a shot of what it looks like, or at least can look like. It's the two separate fences that seems to make it effective, not sure if it messes with their depth perception or what. They could easily jump over it, but they don't.
 

Farm Fence Solutions

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
2,008
Reaction score
0




Not the best pics, but this is a prime example of spending a pile of money on a failure. I recommended 8' net, and they wanted to cheapen it up. They had a "farm architect" draw up a fence design. He drove a Prius and had combed hair and product in his beard, which was three strikes right off the bat. His plan called for 14 strands of HT with a total height of 7' and alternating hot wires. I told em it'd never work, but the well groomed "architect" won over. I've always wondered what they paid that dip ****, but I digress. Two and a half years later, these folks sued me for $6k. Improperly manufactured and installed gates, and it didn't keep critters out. They also said that a brace had failed, which I would always fix if it were the case. (It has happened twice, that I know of) They never did provide any pictures of that brace. Judge ordered mediation, which we went to and they did not. Three trips to court, and the Judge tells us that she needs to think about the amount, but she will be ruling in their favor. I asked why, since we'd proved our case and done everything she's asked. Her response was that she felt like she had to give them something because of all the time they had invested in the suite. I kept my thoughts to myself. 6 months later, we received notice of judgement for $1,000. Makes me mad, but I suppose it could have been worse. The job directly after that one was another where I'd let a customer talk me into a bad idea. I lost my azz, and he ended up with junk. Those were the last two that I let someone talk me into doing it wrong.
That said, I can see where the double fence would work once the deer were trained. It would be a bit of maintenance, but I understand the concept.
 

callmefence

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
6,893
Reaction score
96
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
Farm Fence Solutions":2ns2dnt8 said:




Not the best pics, but this is a prime example of spending a pile of money on a failure. I recommended 8' net, and they wanted to cheapen it up. They had a "farm architect" draw up a fence design. He drove a Prius and had combed hair and product in his beard, which was three strikes right off the bat. His plan called for 14 strands of HT with a total height of 7' and alternating hot wires. I told em it'd never work, but the well groomed "architect" won over. I've always wondered what they paid that dip be nice, but I digress. Two and a half years later, these folks sued me for $6k. Improperly manufactured and installed gates, and it didn't keep critters out. They also said that a brace had failed, which I would always fix if it were the case. (It has happened twice, that I know of) They never did provide any pictures of that brace. Judge ordered mediation, which we went to and they did not. Three trips to court, and the Judge tells us that she needs to think about the amount, but she will be ruling in their favor. I asked why, since we'd proved our case and done everything she's asked. Her response was that she felt like she had to give them something because of all the time they had invested in the suite. I kept my thoughts to myself. 6 months later, we received notice of judgement for $1,000. Makes me mad, but I suppose it could have been worse. The job directly after that one was another where I'd let a customer talk me into a bad idea. I lost my azz, and he ended up with junk. Those were the last two that I let someone talk me into doing it wrong.
That said, I can see where the double fence would work once the deer were trained. It would be a bit of maintenance, but I understand the concept.

I think in the ops situation your solution is best.
Unless its a lease.The situation I'm familiar with the fence is rolled up for hunting season.
Don't ever let a customer talk you into something. The customer is seldom right.
That's why you see 0 wooden braces outta me. :mrgreen: and no permanent electric... :hide:
 

red angus 2010

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
Messages
320
Reaction score
0
Location
Middle Of USA
Gators Rule":122i1vuj said:
I'm in the process of needing to build an electric fence that will help keep deer out of an 70 acre cotton field, in south Georgia. I've roughly calculated the perimeter to be about 7,135 feet, or 1.35 miles. While I would like to do this as economically as possible, I also want to do it right so that this is a one time expenditure, with minimal upkeep expense in subsequent years.

What can I expect? T-posts or wood posts? If T-posts, how long should the T-posts be? Distance between posts? Type of wire? One or two chargers? Solar or electric? If we do the work our self, how much money would I expect to spend? How much if I contacted a fence builder?

Thanks in advance!

David

Remington Model 700 sps varmit in .308 many scope options to choose from, fence will be too costly to erect and maintain.
 

Latest posts

Top