Labor induction signs to look for

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MRRherefords

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We had a cow have a virginal prolapse this morning :( The vet sewed her up and said for us to induce labor when we saw the cow getting close to calving. This cow is not due until late March. She was pasture exposed and I believe I observed her bred on June 21st. I am afraid of not cutting the stitches in time and having a big mess, but on the other hand I don't want to cut them to early and induce labor if she is not ready. What are some key signs I need to observe before inducing labor or cutting stitches? We are going to let her have this calf and then send her down the road.
 
If she bred on June 21st that would have her calving march 29 if she does it by the book. I would cut her string a week before if your confident on breed date or watch for a full udder and her being standoffish with tail raised
 
If you're planning on inducing and have a breeding date, that is extremely helpful! Depending on her breed she could go a few days to a week earlier or later. I have a cow that I've had to induce the last 2 years due to a cervical prolapse, and she's always a few days after her due date (she's being shipped after this next calf). I look for some udder development, dilation of the vulva, and depending on how fat your cow is, you can sometimes notice a bit of a dip between the hooks to pins area (superior area of the pelvis) and the tailhead as she gets very close her due date. I'm definitely not a pro and it does take some close-up eyeballing and knowledge of what your cattle usually look like, but my cattle are just big pets so I know them like the back of my hand! If you're planning on waiting for her to calve on her own, look for her to be uncomfortable (kicking, swishing, excessive standing, tail out). Many cows prefer to move away from the herd while calving. Every animal is different though, that's the complicating factor! I've found that it helps to know your cows in most situations! :lol: :lol:
 
It really does helps to know your animals. :nod: We are not a big herd and so I know each animal very well, and that is a big advantage just like you said Simmgal. This particular cow is a big Hereford, and she is a BIG sign shower. Often times her back end will swell immensely and we are checking in on her every couple of hours and she won't calve for a week. :roll: Thanks for the response SIMMGAL, it was quite helpful.
 
MRRherefords":2m4jdizo said:
It really does helps to know your animals. :nod: We are not a big herd and so I know each animal very well, and that is a big advantage just like you said Simmgal. This particular cow is a big Hereford, and she is a BIG sign shower. Often times her back end will swell immensely and we are checking in on her every couple of hours and she won't calve for a week. :roll: Thanks for the response SIMMGAL, it was quite helpful.

My old girl is a Hereford as well! :lol2: Best of luck with yours! Glad I could help ya! :D
 
I am going to maybe be the harsh one, but I would go ahead and ship the cow as soon as the withdrawal times are past.
The last 2 prolapses I had have not been a good experience. One, the vet said she was at least a month out. Kept her in to get condition back on her, and that weekend (3 days after he came out) I get a call asking if I had cut the string on the cow. I had not. She was a 9 or 10 year old, and had calved enough times that she just pushed that calf out. I was not home, so we made the call to the vet because I just KNEW that it was going to be bad, and it was.
The other, we did induce. I stayed up all night to help the heifer, and ended up pulling the calf. That was a Friday night. She seemed ok on Saturday, but late that night, she must have done some pushing, because we found her the next morning with a uterine prolapse, dead.
I'm not against it, as it has worked in others, but I think you'd be money ahead to go ahead and ship her.
 
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