• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Help with new calf

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

Guest
We just bought a bull calf. He is a longhorn/jersey cross and we were told he is 2 months old although he looks very small. He is skinney but has a big belly on him and pale gums. We were thinking he needs to be wormed but where unable to see the vet today and aren't sure what to do with him till we can see the vet.Any suggestions? IS it safe to feed grain? Tha lady we bought him from had another one same age as him that died from bloat according to her. I don't want t o lose this little guy but am unsure what to do with one this young.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Depending on where you are, it may be a little too late today to do much. Get some good quality hay, maybe from the folks you got him from and give him fresh water. Grain is ok as long as it is a calf starter grain and fed only a pound or so a day till he gets going better. Bare in mind, that was only one persons response.

dun
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
WE have some good quality hay we have been giving him. He seems to like it. He wouldn't eat anything for the lady we bought him from. But he seems to have an appetite now but is still on the lethargic side. I'm just worried because he is so skinney yet bloated looking. Thanks for the repsonse. I appreciate it. Just want to make sure I am doing the right thing till we get to the vet again.
> Depending on where you are, it may
> be a little too late today to do
> much. Get some good quality hay,
> maybe from the folks you got him
> from and give him fresh water.
> Grain is ok as long as it is a
> calf starter grain and fed only a
> pound or so a day till he gets
> going better. Bare in mind, that
> was only one persons response.

> dun



[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
A lot of times, calves that haven't had adequate nutrition will have that hay belly look. He shoudl gradually get to the point where he's eating at least 2 pounds of good calf starter a day. Really he should have been at that point when he was weaned. The important things are to keep him hydrated, out of drafts and don't over feed .

dun

> WE have some good quality hay we
> have been giving him. He seems to
> like it. He wouldn't eat anything
> for the lady we bought him from.
> But he seems to have an appetite
> now but is still on the lethargic
> side. I'm just worried because he
> is so skinney yet bloated looking.
> Thanks for the repsonse. I
> appreciate it. Just want to make
> sure I am doing the right thing
> till we get to the vet again.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Folks have a lot of different reasons for raising animals. Some as pets, some as strictly production, some as enjoyment in having them around. Doesn't matter if it's a dog or a cow, there are always reasons that are valid to the individual. This person wants to make sure that what needs to be done is done.

dun

> Why would you get the vet? The vet
> bill will be twice as much as this
> thing will ever be worth.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> Why would you get the vet? The vet
> bill will be twice as much as this
> thing will ever be worth.

Depends on your vet -- mine would be well worth the expense. He was just out yesterday morning. Dehorned 9 calves, preg. checked 1 cow, and checked a healing infected naval, and looked them all over and pronounced them healthy -- $34. Last year he saved a salebarn calf (and taught me how to recognize a freemartin) for less than $20 -- now that one really paid off, that heifer will be ready to slaughter in a couple of weeks and I sure couldn't buy her now for what little I have in her.

And I agree that you don't need the vet for every little thing, but it does pay off for your vet to be your friend and partner -- I've gotten invaluable advice and instruction over the phone.

Ann B

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> Depends on your vet -- mine would
> be well worth the expense. He was
> just out yesterday morning.
> Dehorned 9 calves, preg. checked 1
> cow, and checked a healing
> infected naval, and looked them
> all over and pronounced them
> healthy -- $34. Last year he saved
> a salebarn calf (and taught me how
> to recognize a freemartin) for
> less than $20 -- now that one
> really paid off, that heifer will
> be ready to slaughter in a couple
> of weeks and I sure couldn't buy
> her now for what little I have in
> her.

> And I agree that you don't need
> the vet for every little thing,
> but it does pay off for your vet
> to be your friend and partner --
> I've gotten invaluable advice and
> instruction over the phone.

> Ann B Hi you guys and gal give great infor. Question 1. how long does it take to wean a calf. 2. what weight should they be after weaning 3. what are the best weihgt to sale, I am thinking 400 to 500#s.

please advise

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> please advise

1)It will take about 10 to 14 days to wean a calf. 2) When you look at the importance of weight when you are being paid by the pound, I would think you would want to opomize the amount of pounds produced per acre or per cow exposed. If you maximatze the weight you may run into calving difficulties. Always keep a balance of the traits for which you are choosing with the other important traits like fertility, calving ease and growth. If you can produce a 400 to 500 pound calf now, push to improve the weaning weight to 500 to 600 pounds with equal or less cost. 3) The price paid per pound is adjusted by the weight of the calf. However the overall dollars received for a heavier calf may be more at sale time. Look at the bottom line, not the price per pound. Also consider to wean 45 days before sale time and vaccinate the calves and bunk break them for possible more return on the bottom line. However, you must adivertise the fact that you have done this or it will be for nothing. In today market anything will bring a good price, but in a different time one should consider addited value actitivies. Good luck



[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> 1)It will take about 10 to 14 days
> to wean a calf. 2) When you look
> at the importance of weight when
> you are being paid by the pound, I
> would think you would want to
> opomize the amount of pounds
> produced per acre or per cow
> exposed. If you maximatze the
> weight you may run into calving
> difficulties. Always keep a
> balance of the traits for which
> you are choosing with the other
> important traits like fertility,
> calving ease and growth. If you
> can produce a 400 to 500 pound
> calf now, push to improve the
> weaning weight to 500 to 600
> pounds with equal or less cost. 3)
> The price paid per pound is
> adjusted by the weight of the
> calf. However the overall dollars
> received for a heavier calf may be
> more at sale time. Look at the
> bottom line, not the price per
> pound. Also consider to wean 45
> days before sale time and
> vaccinate the calves and bunk
> break them for possible more
> return on the bottom line.
> However, you must adivertise the
> fact that you have done this or it
> will be for nothing. In today
> market anything will bring a good
> price, but in a different time one
> should consider addited value
> actitivies. Good luck one question what is bunk break.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ann B (and anyone else),

You have a really cheap vet there. I'd keep him or her.

Just a question- How does one recognize a free martin? I had no idea they were distinguishable at all from a fertile heifer unless you were there when they were born. I would be interested to know for future use and just out of curiosity.

Regards,

Duncan

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Clitoris enlarged, vagina extremely short, and the presence and shape of a particular tuft of hair on the tip of the vulva.

Others can also be found upon palpation -- most freemartins don't have a cervix, or if they do it's small and incomplete (maybe only 1 ring).

The freemartin that I have shows the external signs, but she does cycle and bleed once every 3 months or so. Upon palpation, she doesn't have a cervix, the vagina opens directly into the uterine horns.

Ann B

> Ann B (and anyone else),

> You have a really cheap vet there.
> I'd keep him or her.

> Just a question- How does one
> recognize a free martin? I had no
> idea they were distinguishable at
> all from a fertile heifer unless
> you were there when they were
> born. I would be interested to
> know for future use and just out
> of curiosity.

> Regards,

> Duncan



[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
The problem with freemartins - some will have physical signs, some will be lacking part of the reproductive organs, some will appear perfectly normal, will breed but don't have the required hormone levels to carry a pregnancy to full term. When bred they will miss a heat then cycle. If not bred will cycle on time. Very frustrating. Not all heifers born twins to abull are freemartins, about 95%. Some heifers not born twin to a bull are freemartins. The theory is that the were a twin but the bull was reabsorbed or aborted and the heifer coninued full term. There is a DNA blood test that can be done to identify them.

dun

> Ann B (and anyone else),

> You have a really cheap vet there.
> I'd keep him or her.

> Just a question- How does one
> recognize a free martin? I had no
> idea they were distinguishable at
> all from a fertile heifer unless
> you were there when they were
> born. I would be interested to
> know for future use and just out
> of curiosity.

> Regards,

> Duncan
 

Latest posts

Top