Help with leading

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jaydill

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I've got a 7 month old Simbrah calf with probably the longest legs you've ever seen on a calf in the world. He's gotta be around 700 lbs...he will be a monster once he's finished. He broke pretty easily, minus the overwhelming fear he has of people walking behind him (which we're currently breaking him of). I've halter broken him...but the problem is that when I'm walking him, I always feel like I'm dragging him behind me. I was told to slow down, but when I try to slow down to his speed, he slows down more, and it continues that way until we've stopped. I was also told to try and bring him up so that I'm standing just behind his ear and he has lee way in his lead, but when I try to do that, 1, i have to drag him up beside me (which i'm only 115 lbs and it's not very easy to drag a 700 lb calf up beside you.. especially when he's on eye level with you) and 2, once again...he just stops. Any tips with getting him to walk? I've been told to give him a little tap on the butt with the showstick, but what bothers me about that is that he's got a terrible fear of people behind him and I'm afraid it will spook him and he'll take off with me (which has happened before). Please help!
 

Ryan

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jaydill":17vobhz1 said:
I was also told to try and bring him up so that I'm standing just behind his ear and he has lee way in his lead...

You should not do this. You should always be in front of your calf. If you let him be in front of you a little and have lee way then he is 100% in control of where yall/he goes.

One idea is leave him standing with his head tight for a few hours then lead him to water or to a feed bucket. Then lead him back to his spot. Do this repeatedly and he will begin to understand that you are not taking him anywhere bad and will be more comfortable walking with you.

Ryan
 

4-H fanatic

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tie him to the back of a tractor and wagon and take him for a nice long walk just go at a slow pace he wont be able to stop he'll have to keep walking with no choice. make sure to keep an eye on him and a knife handy incase he flips and hangs himself
 

L Weir

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Don't try the tractor and eagon. You may hurt him. Someone walking behind him may help even though he might not like it. Plus, he has to get used to someone walking behind him if he is going to be a show steer. If he is afraid of people you could play a radio in the barn or have people around while you walk him so he gets used to different voices and people.
 

Ryan

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Putting them behind a tractor can be of good help, but only if you know what you are doing have some experience doing it. You definantly need to get him used to people and other animals behind him, or at the show when another calf is behind he will be hard to handle in the show ring. The best way i've found to relax them when someone is back there, is to stratch them on their rear, under the tail. If they don't like that at first just be slow and patient and he will come around. You definantly need to get him used to someone being back there, b/c usually at the show if he isnt walking the first thing that others do to help is a tap on the butt or leg, or twisting the tail. Don't want anyone to get hurt.

A radio is definantly good help to get them used to different noises.

Ryan
 

1848

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jaydill":2u2x4mxt said:
I've halter broken him...but the problem is that when I'm walking him, I always feel like I'm dragging him behind me. I was told to slow down, but when I try to slow down to his speed, he slows down more, and it continues that way until we've stopped.

Any tips with getting him to walk? I've been told to give him a little tap on the butt with the showstick, but what bothers me about that is that he's got a terrible fear of people behind him and I'm afraid it will spook him and he'll take off with me (which has happened before). Please help!

Sounds like the calf is not a broke but just conceeding. You need to gain his confidence more, if he is going to be willing to walk next to you or not be skittish from behind. Gaining confidence is done in a small pen or when the calf is tied to a "secure object". Touching him in all areas (use a show stick or something for the rear until he is used to it). Stand behind him while he is eating, even if he dosn't like it at first. In a small pen, stand or Sit in a chair and make him come up to the feed at your feet, and slowly begain to touch him. Touch him as he walks by until he dosen't run. Walk around him back and forth (while he is tied up) in is his blind spots until his is used to it. Talking an movement so he gets more comforable is good. Washing the animal is probably the best way to settle it down, just be careful at first. This all might take a few days to a couple of weeks. Once you have done this you can try the following.

I would not touch that size animal in the rear with a stick "yet" if he is skittish, especially considering "your" size. He is likely to take off and drag you, but this habit can be used to your advantage. If he is like some calves, he will gladly step off if you get just "behind" his head, (in his flight zone, maintaining control of the halter) but this should be done by somebody larger and in control. Don't get any farther back then just behind the head. The instant he tries to move out too quickly tug on the halter to keep him even with you. (almost like letting him walk you but with more control) You will play, you stop, I stop at first, but eventually it will get smoother. If he tries to take off (or bolt) when you move back behind his head (flight zone) pull his head around towards his body, and work him, and control him by making him go in a circle. (head againts his side). Don not put yourself in a position in front of him. or give him slack in the halter..maintain control. A second halter on the opposite side at a distance with some slack in it might help you since you are so small (incase he tried to bolt). This is how we maintain control of our calves, by always pulling them back in a circle (also be in a small pen with a long lead so you always have control or can always regain it w/o chasing the calf). By stepping back and letting the calf step off first you will eventually be able to pull on the halter and make him come back to you, and before long you will walk side by side. The tricks about one step, slack, and reward is a good tip ,as is making him want to go to feed or water and be willing to walk with you. They can be used in conjunction with other methods. Just be careful and never drop your guard.
 

1848

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I just saw where there is another post simular to yours on the Show Board. May want to look at those. Sounds like some good advice there too.
 
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jaydill

jaydill

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Well the thing is, I can get behind him just fine without him running...and I can bathe him and touch him everywhere with no problem. I think part of it is a confidence thing...as I've been observing his behavior and it does seem like he's a little more fearful of me than I'd probably like for him to be. I think I'm going to move back towards block one...and what I'm going to try is not washing him everyday for about a week from now (his feet are sore from hoof trimming anyway) and just feeding him out of my lap and re-establishing that bond which I'd created with him my first two weeks of having him. Towards the end of the week, I think I'll start leading him to the water and feed like was suggested. Hopefully it'll help...thanks for all the good advice! Once I start taking him out with the stick again...I'll definitely try getting into that flight zone by his head (although previous attempts at that have resulted in him just stopping) and we'll see what happens about a week and a half from now. Thanks for all the advice and please do check back because I'm going to try and update once I've tried this stuff. I think the tying him to the trailer thing will be a very last resort...as I do know people who've tried it but we've already had enough life threatening incidents happen to him in the past 2 weeks or so (lol). Thanks again!

<3 Texas
 

1848

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Caustic Burno":1upjy4hs said:
Best way to lead is with an axe handle as your are runnin them down the chute to the salebarn to turn them into folding money.

Your suppose to be helping the girl, no scaring her! :shock:
 

cowgirl580

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i don't know if you've tried this or not or if this will even help but i use to tie my steer up when brushing, bathing, messing with, etc.. to a deflated inner tube that was around a post. the inner tube gives them some room to move, but sucks them back to where you want them. i used this on my 4-H steers and it helped a lot. we still had our moments when we would slam each other into walls or what not, but they all did great in the ring. good luck to ya
 

flaboy

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1848":3bnt9lxy said:
Caustic Burno":3bnt9lxy said:
Best way to lead is with an axe handle as your are runnin them down the chute to the salebarn to turn them into folding money.

Your suppose to be helping the girl, no scaring her! :shock:

Usually when I get my bullwhip out, I don't have a problem with them lagging behind. :lol:

I am not a trainer although I have taught a few how to get to the stock yards. Over the years I have done a little for the one's I have sold to show'rs when I have had time. For laggers I get a long flexible pole and hand it to someone to walk behind them. Usually 4 foot works. Just a little tap every now and then usaully works. I used to use the heiferette but she stole my money and left.
 

SF

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jaydill":1noy3gru said:
I've got a 7 month old Simbrah calf with probably the longest legs you've ever seen on a calf in the world. He's gotta be around 700 lbs...he will be a monster once he's finished. He broke pretty easily, minus the overwhelming fear he has of people walking behind him (which we're currently breaking him of). I've halter broken him...but the problem is that when I'm walking him, I always feel like I'm dragging him behind me. I was told to slow down, but when I try to slow down to his speed, he slows down more, and it continues that way until we've stopped. I was also told to try and bring him up so that I'm standing just behind his ear and he has lee way in his lead, but when I try to do that, 1, i have to drag him up beside me (which i'm only 115 lbs and it's not very easy to drag a 700 lb calf up beside you.. especially when he's on eye level with you) and 2, once again...he just stops. Any tips with getting him to walk? I've been told to give him a little tap on the butt with the showstick, but what bothers me about that is that he's got a terrible fear of people behind him and I'm afraid it will spook him and he'll take off with me (which has happened before). Please help!

Jay; I've got a couple of ideas for you, but it sounds like to me that you've got a couple of different problems here. First you need to get this calf where he isn't jumpy with someone behind him. Tie him up and get around him, behind him, brush him, wash him, etc... The wash rack is the quickest place to gentle one down and get them over this. Especially in this heat. They won't mind the cool water. Now we will work on the leading problem
1. Tie him with his head up high for a few hours prior to working with him. When I say high, I mean stretched out a little. Make his neck just a little sore. Got to stay around, in case he falls, that he doesn't hang himself.
2. Take him out and lead him, but stay in front of the calf, not beside him.
3. If he lags back, have someone walk behind him, or try taking a rope, about 12 feet long. Drape it behind him, under his tail. When he stops, pull on the rope, this will get him moving for you. Lots of rope to deal with here, so be careful and don't get tangled up.
4. If this calf has pulled away from you before, or gets a little tough to handle, put a nose ring him during this process. Need to make sure the calf knows who is in charge.

Good luck
 

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