Grassfed cattle supplements

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brandonm_13

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I know grain isn't allowed in grassfed cattle, but what are some supplements that are allowed in grassfed/grass finished cattle? Alfalfa pellets/cubes/meal are, but what about beet pulp, dried molasses, different kinds of minerals etc? I looked for some kind of regulations, but couldn't really find any.
 

TexasBred

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brandonm_13":h96gparc said:
I know grain isn't allowed in grassfed cattle, but what are some supplements that are allowed in grassfed/grass finished cattle? Alfalfa pellets/cubes/meal are, but what about beet pulp, dried molasses, different kinds of minerals etc? I looked for some kind of regulations, but couldn't really find any.
Not cubes...they usually contain grain and grain by-products......nor dried molasses....it usually is little more than molasses sprayed on a carrier which is often grain or grain by-products. I'd just look at good grazing and good hay including alfalfa. Some of the other "allowables" are too costly to feed.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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Go to the USDA website and search for their program requirements. Basically, anything that has seed heads in it and/or urea is pretty much outlawed. Includes any bagged supplements that contain those things. Have to be raised from birth, if i'm not mistaken, as grass fed. There are couple other programs you can do that are not quite as restrictive as "Natural, Grass Fed".
 

1982vett

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TexasBred

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1982vett":1mwc5eud said:
So mature bermuda grass would be out becuase it has seedheads? Same with every other type of forage? They all produce seed. No alfalfa because it may have bloomed for fear it may have a seed? No clover after it starts flowering? I would challenge one to find a pasture free of any type of seed at anytime of the year. Thistle seed is everywhere.

If USDA deems that "grass fed" means eliminating every seed from a cows diet, they are truly as nuts as the most other government funded programs.

Vett..you should get the drift...basically they mean "cereal grains".
 
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brandonm_13

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Does anyone else think it's strange that you can't feed wheat grain to a cow, but you can feed wheat hay, which has all the grain still attached and it's okay?
 

TexasBred

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brandonm_13":3522c4wj said:
Does anyone else think it's strange that you can't feed wheat grain to a cow, but you can feed wheat hay, which has all the grain still attached and it's okay?

Yeah it really is...but most wheat hay cut "on time" will have immature seed heads I suppose. Look at this advertisement I found about "natural grass fed" beef.


Eaton Natural Beef is a family owned and operated ranch in Eastern Washington. The USDA inspected beef is dry aged for 2 weeks for tenderness and flavor. The Eatons believe in raising their cows as close to their natural way of being as possible.
These grass-fed cattle have two feeding seasons, resulting in slightly different flavor attributes depending on the time of year. From April through December, their diet consists of 100% foraged grasses on our pasture. In the winter feeding period, from January to April, the cattle eat 2 lbs. of grain (wheat and pea screenings) to supplement their diet of alfalfa, oat hay and grass hay. This is important because the animal’s diet has an impact on the marbling of the meat. During the winter months, the beef will have more marbling. In the summer months, the meat will be leaner.

Fill your chest freezer with grass-fed beef from Eaton Ranch. You can order a quarter or a side of beef. The quarter beef is a “mixed” quarter and weighs approximately 100lbs. This means that you would be receiving cuts from both the front and the back of the cow. The half beef is about 200lbs. And a whole is 400lbs.
 
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brandonm_13

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I don't really see how their winter beef can be "natural" by feeding grain. Granted, it's not a feedlot diet, and I really don't have a problem with it, but still I don't see how it qualifies.

Of course I keep coming back to the notion that ruminants in the wild eat grain, again not feedlot diets of grain, but have you ever seen a deer in a cornfield?
 

TexasBred

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brandonm_13":oi4r7gnu said:
I don't really see how their winter beef can be "natural" by feeding grain. Granted, it's not a feedlot diet, and I really don't have a problem with it, but still I don't see how it qualifies.

Of course I keep coming back to the notion that ruminants in the wild eat grain, again not feedlot diets of grain, but have you ever seen a deer in a cornfield?

True...don't see how these people have the nerve to advertise grass fed beef when they acknowledge that they do "purposely" feed grain....and if the admit 2 lbs. they're probably feeding a lot more. ;-) And true even wild ruminants will eat grain given the right situation and exposure to grain but in general they tend to stay with grasses and brouse.
 

edrsimms

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brandonm_13":12dd678b said:
I know grain isn't allowed in grassfed cattle, but what are some supplements that are allowed in grassfed/grass finished cattle? Alfalfa pellets/cubes/meal are, but what about beet pulp, dried molasses, different kinds of minerals etc? I looked for some kind of regulations, but couldn't really find any.


It is a slippery slope between what some refer to as "Natural" and 100% Grass-fed. They can Label it as "Natural" and feed some grain, but when they combine the "Grass fed" they are pushing their labeling restrictions....
A few emails from valued customers should straighten that out
 

novaman

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TexasBred":3d0a4uom said:
Couldn't "natural" include tons of grain as long as you don't use antibiotics and growth harmones??
Yup. No implants, ionophores or other antibiotitcs are the only rules to qualify as natural. They can get all the grain they want.
 

TexasBred

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novaman":2wjnha7k said:
TexasBred":2wjnha7k said:
Couldn't "natural" include tons of grain as long as you don't use antibiotics and growth harmones??
Yup. No implants, ionophores or other antibiotitcs are the only rules to qualify as natural. They can get all the grain they want.


Guess I got an "all natural" herd then. And no more than they've been getting to eat in this dry weather they might even qualify for "organic". :lol2: :lol2:
 

Running Arrow Bill

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For further information:

Federal Register
Vol. 72, No.199
October 16, 2007.

Three options:

100% Natural grass Fed
Free Roaming Grain Fed
Grain Fed

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"Grain type grasses" can be used as long as seed heads have not formed in wheat, oats, barley, etc., etc. when used as hay. When there are seed heads in the hay (or grain type grasses) then one has "Free Roaming Grain Fed". When feeds, supplements, ureas based products fed...then "Grain Fed" (aka "Feedlots").
 

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