Filaree or Storksbill and Lamintis

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CircleA

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does any one have experience with this weed?

http://www.sacsplash.org/plants/erobot.htm

We have a 15 year old Qtr/ Mo Fox-trotter that is acting stiff. He has been in the pasture all winter up until Sunday when we went on a hour long ride. I think he is just fat and out of shape - but wife asked her local expert and he said it is lamintis. I wonder how a horse could get lamintis on our weak, very weak pastures. The expert said it was this weed.

BTW, four horses were out together and they were provide hay - grass & alf/grass as well as what they would graze.

Thanks for any insights!

Alex
 

CattleAnnie

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Sometimes even something like a stone bruise to the frog can sore a horse up for a while. Did you do any riding over stony ground or gravel roads?
What exactly made the guy think that the horse had laminitis?
I know a wee bit more about founder, long story (auction mart draft mare purchase for choring, etc.), so I'm curious as to how 'fat' your horse is.
Usually the horse will stand with the forelegs kind of extended. They will 'point' alternately with them to ease the discomfort, as a horse bears more weight with it's forelegs than hind.
 
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CircleA

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Howdy all -
about the local expert - you all know him - he has done everything, at one time or another- yet isn't in the business now....

When i say fat, I could be over zealous in his shape - they (all of the horses) have been out on pasture since beginning of winter - no exercise except what they themselves do running around the pasture. Jake, didn't do much except eat while turned out.

Every spring it is like this, got to get both the horses and myself to lose some of that winter fat!

Everything around is is rocky or ROCK - so I am sure that is it - little sore, out of shape - no worries. Except when some yahoo scares the wife!

Thanks all,

Alex
 

CattleAnnie

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Glad to hear everythings okay, Alex.
One easy way to check for a stone bruise is by applying pressure to the sole. When you hit the sore spot, he'll probably jerk his foot back a little.
I know about the joy of rocky ground here too... of all the luck I once had a gelding go lame on both front feet at once. Felt like a real dumbie after panicked and got the vet out to check him (somebody spoonfed me the whole 'laminitis' story too), and turned out the horse had a stone bruise on his left sole, and an abcess on the right. A few days of treatment and he was sound in a week. No problems after that.
One nifty little trick that an old hand told me to use on a tender-footed horse is to apply straight iodine to the sole. Apparantly it drives the nerves up in the sole. Never tried it myself. Anyone else?
However, if I've got a horse like that I just throw a set of front shoes on him and get to work.
Take care.
 
A

Anonymous

Glad to hear everythings okay, Alex.
One easy way to check for a stone bruise is by applying pressure to the sole. When you hit the sore spot, he'll probably jerk his foot back a little.
I know about the joy of rocky ground here too... of all the luck I once had a gelding go lame on both front feet at once. Felt like a real dumbie after panicked and got the vet out to check him (somebody spoonfed me the whole 'laminitis' story too), and turned out the horse had a stone bruise on his left sole, and an abcess on the right. A few days of treatment and he was sound in a week. No problems after that.
One nifty little trick that an old hand told me to use on a tender-footed horse is to apply straight iodine to the sole. Apparantly it drives the nerves up in the sole. Never tried it myself. Anyone else?
However, if I've got a horse like that I just throw a set of front shoes on him and get to work.
Take care.

Just a bit curious as to how "throwing a set of shoes on the front feet" affects the horse getting a stone bruise which would be to the sole of the foot?
 

CattleAnnie

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I've got one gelding in particular that has very tender soles. If you ride him on hard ground, he winces along slowly. Makes it very difficult to keep up with cattle.

However, as bizarre as it might sound, if he has a set of fronts on, he steps out perfectly.

Being neither a farrier nor a veterinarian, I can't tell you why it works, only that even if we're trailing cattle down the gravel road or crossing a rocky ford, he travels more comfortably with shoes on and never pulls up lame, unlike barefooted, in which he'll be sore for days after and therefore useless to the operation.

Take care.
 
A

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I think throwing some shoes on would help, not only for future soundness in his work, but shoes would effectively raise the sole and the frog off the gound, taking the pressure off them and taking the brunt of the weight when the horse puts his foot down. It would also help to take the pressure off of a stone bruise that has already occured. Stone bruises can be a pain and sometimes are best dealt with by a farrier. With a bruise, there is a blood pocket maybe large or small sitting under the sole and you have to dig to find it, but if you are successful, the blood will drain out immediately, relieving the pressure and the pain right away. Otherwise, it will take time for the blood and the pressure/pain to dissapate. On an unshod hoof, the brunt of the footfall weight is not on the outside wall, but if you take two fingers and place them on each side of the tip of the frog, that where the weight falls, that, and the fatter heel part of the frog. I've had a good farrier that was very knowledgeable tell me that if you paint on iodine for three days in a row, it should toughen up the sole, but you've got to quit after three days, no longer. The iodine, in effect, burns the outer sole membrane, establishes a thick layer of dead cells that are toughened, thereby providing a protective barrier to the sensitive nerve endings. Shoes can be expensive and if your horse throws one, you are left with a really sensitive foot (like going barefoot for the first time yourself) and he's out of commission until the farrier shows up again. For some of us out in the boondocks, shoes are just not a convenient option. I've heard lots of good reports on those Old Mac Boots. They look hilarious when they are on, but they work and aren't as costly as shoes are.
This farrier I had retired his practise to go work full time in a zoo, and I'm not really sorry to lose him. Although he was very knowlegdeable and informative and knew his stuff, especially when it came to hoof trauma, he had a shoer's mentality and pared my horses hooves down to shoe applying level (I don't shoe) and pared down the frog with it. They couldn't move for two weeks after he left, so I complained, that's when he told me about the iodine, but I realized that it was only a cure from his visit, that he shouldn't be leaving my horses this way. His explanation was, well people generally don't take care of their horse's feet and I like to trim them right down so that dirt can't get a foothold in there and they don't have problems like thrush the next time I come. I continued to tell him that I DO take care of my horse's feet, so leave it, I'll clean it, but he wouldn't listen. Even the frog, naturally only sheds 2x a year and he was peeling it down to nothing every 6 weeks! No wonder they didn't want to move! So I found a new farrier that is "barefoot friendly" and haven't had to use the iodine since. But it will help you, but only 3 days, no more. And if your horse already has stone bruises, I'd find them and drain them before you apply the iodine, cause it will only make it harder to find them. Good luck!
 

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