Dozing and Missouri heat

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Missourifarming

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In south central Missouri, we are in the process of dozing 36 acres of heavily wooded land (cedar oak elm). This was all supposed to be done beginning to mid April but due to weather we are pushing to look like some time in May. I have some very high erosion areas that I’m worried about because this bringing To light some nice top soil that we had originally thought was mostly rock. Is there anything I can plant that will 1. Give me fast sprout 2. Survive our heat
 

Atimm693

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Green graze (sorghum sudan) does well. We usually get it in around the end of may and get 2-3 cuttings. Good for hay/silage and grazing.
 

D2Cat

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If you're wanting something for cover and quick growth, go to a seed store and get some contractors mix seed. They use it after finishing a project to get things looking good quickly.
 

bigbluegrass

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I'll agree with the Sudan folks. I have been clearing wooded land, similar to what you are doing. I do it as I have time. I have planted pearl millet, german millet, buckwheat, sun hemp and other summer annuals I am probably forgetting to help with erosion control. Sudan grass has always been a top performer. Of course, it depends on what you want to do with it besides just erosion control. I have not had Sudan fail me yet. I had a stand I grazed hard in later summer and then planted grass into the stubble. That worked well. I had another I grazed in the fall, then planted to winter wheat and the next spring planted to grass; that work but not as well. I had an area I planted Sudan, grazed it in the fall, then fed hay on it over the winter, then seeded grass in the spring. That worked the best.

Of course this is all based on KY, not MO.
 

1982vett

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In south central Missouri, we are in the process of dozing 36 acres of heavily wooded land (cedar oak elm). This was all supposed to be done beginning to mid April but due to weather we are pushing to look like some time in May. I have some very high erosion areas that I’m worried about because this bringing To light some nice top soil that we had originally thought was mostly rock. Is there anything I can plant that will 1. Give me fast sprout 2. Survive our heat
Oh come on now.....:D Survive Missouri heat?

Anything already mentioned. Maybe add some cowpeas for a legume/nitrogen fixing component. This assuming your thinking it's to late to establish your "permanent plan". But you know your hurdles better than I.
 

Lee VanRoss

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If you plant Sudan, throw on plenty of nitrogen and pray for rain. pray in any case!
 
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Missourifarming

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I'll agree with the Sudan folks. I have been clearing wooded land, similar to what you are doing. I do it as I have time. I have planted pearl millet, german millet, buckwheat, sun hemp and other summer annuals I am probably forgetting to help with erosion control. Sudan grass has always been a top performer. Of course, it depends on what you want to do with it besides just erosion control. I have not had Sudan fail me yet. I had a stand I grazed hard in later summer and then planted grass into the stubble. That worked well. I had another I grazed in the fall, then planted to winter wheat and the next spring planted to grass; that work but not as well. I had an area I planted Sudan, grazed it in the fall, then fed hay on it over the winter, then seeded grass in the spring. That worked the best.

Of course this is all based on KY, not MO.
We plan to turn all it into grazing pasture for cows, it was suggested to us by many people to wait to plant till Labor Day, I’m in immediate worry of the erosion areas even if we do decide to wait
 
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Missourifarming

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Oh come on now.....:D Survive Missouri heat?

Anything already mentioned. Maybe add some cowpeas for a legume/nitrogen fixing component. This assuming your thinking it's to late to establish your "permanent plan". But you know your hurdles better than I.
It’s been suggested several times to wait to plan until Labor Day for our area, even if we do wait we will still need something to hold the ground in these erosion areas
 

Lucky_P

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On the fescue, if/when you put it in later, this fall...forget endophyte-free...the first time you get into a drought or overgrazing situation, it'll turn toes-up. Go with a novel-endophyte type, instead.
 

bigbluegrass

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We plan to turn all it into grazing pasture for cows, it was suggested to us by many people to wait to plant till Labor Day, I’m in immediate worry of the erosion areas even if we do decide to wait
When do you plan to seed permanent pasture? The reason I ask is that Sudan will keep growing until it freezes, which might be a bit later than you would like if you plan to seed this fall.
 

1982vett

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It’s been suggested several times to wait to plan until Labor Day for our area, even if we do wait we will still need something to hold the ground in these erosion areas
Agree...you need a plow down crop. I would have mentioned soybean too but I tried that once, mixed then with the cowpeas. Got a hard rain after I planted and they couldn’t/didn’t break through the crust. Not really suited for my soil but might be for you.

Thinking with cowpeas, you might get two crops. Let the first get ripe, shred off, plow down and let grow till you need to get ready for planting in the fall.

Still best to get advice from and around your area.
 

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