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skyhightree1

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How many cattle should I have per acre? I am discing up my fields tomorrow to plant rye grass and white clover I will be planting it pretty heavy and putting about 5 tons of fertilizer on 4 acres. so I am trying to figure out about how many I can put per acre. My grandfather would only put one per acre is this accurate?
 

FarmGirl10

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Stocking rate varies depending on where your at. The best way to find out what your stocking rate is by contacting your county extension agent.
 

Alberta farmer

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I have never heard of anyone putting 1.25 tons of fertilizer on an acre of anything. Would anything even grow?
 

Caustic Burno

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skyhightree1":2yiydxio said:
How many cattle should I have per acre? I am discing up my fields tomorrow to plant rye grass and white clover I will be planting it pretty heavy and putting about 5 tons of fertilizer on 4 acres. so I am trying to figure out about how many I can put per acre. My grandfather would only put one per acre is this accurate?


Sounds to me like you are fixing to nitrate poison some cattle at 5 tons of fertilizer on 4 acres. Secondly at that rate I don't see how you could ever make a profit, here thats 2500 dollars of fertilizer. If you were able to run two cows per acre with out poisoning the fetus thats only a return of 800 dollars.
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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It is actually a mixture of lime and fertilizer. The land was used to grow corn and soybeans the last 10 years with no fertilizer added so I am basically discing up the fertilizer after its spread. I just want the soil to product nice thick pasture for them to feed. I am open for suggestions.
 

options

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Only at cattle today would you get replies about applying to much fertilizer without anyone ever considering the analysis of the fertilizer. It is common practice to apply anywhere from 56000 to 80000 pounds of fertilizer per acre here.
 

dun

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skyhightree1":2u0ofq2e said:
It is actually a mixture of lime and fertilizer. The land was used to grow corn and soybeans the last 10 years with no fertilizer added so I am basically discing up the fertilizer after its spread. I just want the soil to product nice thick pasture for them to feed. I am open for suggestions.
First "suggestion" is to do a soil test and see what is actaully needed.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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skyhightree1":2qoa6ctb said:
It is actually a mixture of lime and fertilizer. The land was used to grow corn and soybeans the last 10 years with no fertilizer added so I am basically discing up the fertilizer after its spread. I just want the soil to product nice thick pasture for them to feed. I am open for suggestions.


Take soil sample to determine proper fertilizer rates. Not only will this save you money but it will also give you the proper growth you are looking for. Around here it cost 10 dollars for a soil sample.

Disc the ground up. Take a fertilizer spreader and put the ryegrass seed and the fertilizer in there. Broadcast it on the ground. Wait, after first ran the rye grass will come on like no other.


Lastly, check with your county agent as to stocking rates in your area as it varies.
 

backhoeboogie

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options":2ya8f0hz said:
Only at cattle today would you get replies about applying to much fertilizer without anyone ever considering the analysis of the fertilizer. It is common practice to apply anywhere from 56000 to 80000 pounds of fertilizer per acre here.

If I were you, I'd move or else get out of the cattle business.
 

chippie

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options":3039xbw2 said:
Only at cattle today would you get replies about applying to much fertilizer without anyone ever considering the analysis of the fertilizer. It is common practice to apply anywhere from 56000 to 80000 pounds of fertilizer per acre here.

28 to 40 tons per acre???
skep.gif
You've got to be kidding!
 

marksmu

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Im down in South East Texas, hurricane IKE deposited a nice 6ft of salt water across one of my fields that stayed put for about 3 weeks....2 months later I did my soil sample to determine if it was even feasible to plant a rye crop that year. The return from the place told me that I needed 300lbs Nitrogen and 2.6 tons Lime/Acre...I thought about it for about 2 seconds, and said naa....not worth it. I stuck out 2 bags of rye in November to just see what happened....never rained anyways.

Bout the end of February we got our first winter rain, and wouldn't you know it, that Rye popped up anyways. I never grazed it, just mowed it under after it went to seed. But 4-5 tons seems excessive...I cant imagine a field being in much worse shape than mine, and I was nowhere near what your planning on doing. And my N was almost off the charts on the low side.
 

dun

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chippie":2ry0r60j said:
options":2ry0r60j said:
Only at cattle today would you get replies about applying to much fertilizer without anyone ever considering the analysis of the fertilizer. It is common practice to apply anywhere from 56000 to 80000 pounds of fertilizer per acre here.

28 to 40 tons per acre???
skep.gif
You've got to be kidding!
There is fertilizer then ther is FERTILIZER. Chicken litter around here goes on at about a ton and ahalf an acre. FERTILIZER more then 100 lbs per acre
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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Yes, I am planning on purchasing some cattle around 4 calves. I will see how that goes and grow my heard from there. I am probably going to purchase black angus or charolais or hereford. I grew up on a farm with these breeds.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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skyhightree1":1cbauxwi said:
Yes, I am planning on purchasing some cattle around 4 calves. I will see how that goes and grow my heard from there. I am probably going to purchase black angus or charolais or hereford. I grew up on a farm with these breeds.


You cant grow your herd. If you only got 4 acres 4 head will be pushing it.
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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I am starting off with the 4 acres I am in process of purchasing 25 acres right beside my property but the land will require clearing and take some time. I will expand then when I have the 25 acres taken care of and fenced in for now just want something to start off with.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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skyhightree1":1622kcy8 said:
I am starting off with the 4 acres I am in process of purchasing 25 acres right beside my property but the land will require clearing and take some time. I will expand then when I have the 25 acres taken care of and fenced in for now just want something to start off with.


Now I get the picture. That sounds perfectly logical now. Thanks for the clarification.
 

Douglas

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I would encourage you to incorporate the lime and some fertilizer with the disc. Lime on top of the soil moves down very slowly and the sooner you get it working the better for your clover particularly. Either leave the seed on top of the clean seedbed or cover slightly with a cultipacker or drag no more than 1/4 inch. If the soil is too soft the cows will sink down in wet weather. Biggest mistake people make is getting seed too deep.

You can add some fertilizer later when you know you have good germination and moisture. Grass can only use so much nitrogen at a time and it can leach out before it gets used. When you need a lot, it is usually better split apply. Also it seems fertilizer prices are falling so you may be better off to wait for some of it, but get the needed lime out asap since it takes about 6 months to start working.

Not sure your location but ryegrass produces the best in the spring so that is when the fertilizer will be needed most. If you need grazing this fall think about adding cereal rye or wheat.
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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Thanks to everyone for there helpful tips and ensight. I appreciate everything. I love this site should have been on here sooner..
 

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