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xbred

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a local supermarket advertised "certified angus beef" saying, "only 8% of all beef is good enough to be certified angus beef". this can't be a true statement, or is it?
 

mnmtranching

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When they say "all beef" they consider a lot of commercial type beef.

I can believe it. Not many cattle over all will grade choice or better.
Any choice grade from any cattle would be in the top 10% of "all beef"
 

Frankie

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xbred":2ijxcp8d said:
a local supermarket advertised "certified angus beef" saying, "only 8% of all beef is good enough to be certified angus beef". this can't be a true statement, or is it?

While I wouldn't necessarily say "good enough", it is true that only about 8% of all US beef meets the CAB specifications. But think about it. The first requirement is being black, that disqualifies a good percentage of cattle. The animal must be "A" maturity, so cull cows are disqualified. Then they can't have dairy influence. Dairy cattle make up a good portion of the beef produced in this country. A hump also disqualifies cattle, so that knocks out many Brahman influenced animals. Then there are the grading standards. Low marbling is the reason that most animals fail to qualify, even though they may meet the other specs.
 

Bez+

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:D :D

xbred,

You are joking are you not?

There has been so much about CAB on this site.

I will step away now - leaving you with this statement for you to chew on and others to tell me to screw off:

CAB is not about Angus and Angus content - all that matters is the cow is black and does not have a hump.

Quality to be determined at a later date.

Regards

Bez+
 

novatech

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While nearly a third of straight Angus cattle achieved CAB acceptance
This was taken from taken from http://www.cattletoday.com/archive/2008 ... 1634.shtml By Mark McCully, supply development director for Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB).
This makes me wonder where the other 2/3's is coming from.
I read this as; Two thirds of pure Angus cattle will not meet CAB specifications.
 

Frankie

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novatech":1q5n90bc said:
While nearly a third of straight Angus cattle achieved CAB acceptance
This was taken from taken from http://www.cattletoday.com/archive/2008 ... 1634.shtml By Mark McCully, supply development director for Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB).
This makes me wonder where the other 2/3's is coming from.
I read this as; Two thirds of pure Angus cattle will not meet CAB specifications.

You're a jealous, dishonest person, Novatech. Here's the entire paragraph from your link:

Marbling scores trended higher in a direct correlation with percentage Angus influence. While nearly a third of straight Angus cattle achieved CAB acceptance or USDA Prime, the low-influence cattle made only 9.3 percent CAB and only 0.3 percent qualified for Prime. On the other hand, less than one percent of the straight Angus cattle were discounted as USDA Standard, compared to more than five percent of the low Angus.

Genetics is only a portion of quality beef production. You can mismanage a potential Prime steer down to Standard, but you can't manage a genetically Standard steer up to Prime.

Since you posted the link, I'll go ahead and quote some other stuff from it: :D

Straightbred Angus cattle showed better feedlot health and lower treatment costs than cattle with less Angus influence. The straightbred average treatment cost of $4.60 per head was $3 less than that for the lowest-Angus-influence cattle.

Moreover, that was less than the treatment costs for the typical crossbreds in the middle quartiles. Overall health significantly improved with increased Angus influence. Straight Angus cattle had a sickness rate of 14.8 percent, while cattle with low influence had a rate of 22.8 percent.

In that study, the 2.79 percent mortality rate in groups of straight blacks compared to 18.39 percent in black baldies of the same frame size, 12.93 percent in all black baldies and 6.34 percent in mixed-color lots.

He notes that the numbers say producers can expect both higher performance and quality grades from straight Angus cattle. “Wise cattlemen will make sure they are looking at all the facts when they make decisions on genetics,” McCully says.

As someone smarter than me posted here recently, there are more reasons than CAB for Angus to be popular.
 

Mod2

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And that will end this thread before it gets to the urinating contest stage
 
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