Breeding hefiers

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Cindy

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Do you breed your heifers by weight or age? and if by weight how much should a new heifer weigh? Thank You
 

Stickney94

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I do what my father taught me -- breed at roughly 13-14 months of age. If they are light weight they probably wouldn't have been selected as a replacement.
 

TCRanch

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I select my retained heifers based on lineage, the first ones to calve, structure and docility. They make the final cut when I have them pelvic measured at 11 months when they get their BANGS (instead of "standard" measuring at 12 months). Minimum score is 150. Turned out with a calving ease bull at 15 months, should calve when they're 2 years old.

Big girls with big butts don't always have a big pelvis.
 

SBMF 2015

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TCRanch said:
I select my retained heifers based on lineage, the first ones to calve, structure and docility. They make the final cut when I have them pelvic measured at 11 months when they get their BANGS (instead of "standard" measuring at 12 months). Minimum score is 150. Turned out with a calving ease bull at 15 months, should calve when they're 2 years old.

Big girls with big butts don't always have a big pelvis.

What kind of measurements are you getting? I was always taught 140sqcm @ 13mos old.
I pelvic measure mine at 9-10mos. A little young, but that's when I freeze brand. Anything under 132sqcm I rechecked 3mos later. If they don't pass then they go to the feedlot.
The only breed that I have seen consistently measure huge is beef Shorthorns
 
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Cindy

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Ok so just by age then Correct? 13-14 mos. we can do. I will have the vet measure her as I don't want calving problems. I know that random things can happen just by chance. But I don't want to breed a big bull with a 1st time heifer. Then cause problems by my own making. Thank you for your responses!
 

TCRanch

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SBMF 2015 said:
TCRanch said:
I select my retained heifers based on lineage, the first ones to calve, structure and docility. They make the final cut when I have them pelvic measured at 11 months when they get their BANGS (instead of "standard" measuring at 12 months). Minimum score is 150. Turned out with a calving ease bull at 15 months, should calve when they're 2 years old.

Big girls with big butts don't always have a big pelvis.

What kind of measurements are you getting? I was always taught 140sqcm @ 13mos old.
I pelvic measure mine at 9-10mos. A little young, but that's when I freeze brand. Anything under 132sqcm I rechecked 3mos later. If they don't pass then they go to the feedlot.
The only breed that I have seen consistently measure huge is beef Shorthorns

With a score of 150 a heifer should theoretically have a 72 lb calf unassisted. I use a high calving ease bull on my heifers and calves generally range from 65 - 80 lbs, depending on the heifer. This year my heifers averaged 181; one of them scored a whopping 232 (baby's got back!!).

This is a good explanation of pelvic measurements from the University of Arkansas:
https://www.uaex.edu/publications/PDF/FSA-3010.pdf
 

TCRanch

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Stocker Steve said:
TCRanch Minimum score is 150. Turned out with a calving ease bull at 15 months said:
What percent do you fail for less than 150 ?

I've only had 4 that I culled because I made two exceptions with heifers that scored 144, knowing I may need to watch them more closely. Actually did have to pull one but only because of malpresentation; one leg was completely back and the calf was kind of twisted (named it Twister).

Couple years ago I was shocked when one of my faves didn't make the cut. Her sister scored 162.5, the lineage has always been prolific and she was maybe 130 - don't remember exactly but equated to a 57 lb calf unassisted. Could she have successfully calved without assistance? Maybe. But I don't want to take the risk.
 

SBMF 2015

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TCRanch said:
SBMF 2015 said:
TCRanch said:
I select my retained heifers based on lineage, the first ones to calve, structure and docility. They make the final cut when I have them pelvic measured at 11 months when they get their BANGS (instead of "standard" measuring at 12 months). Minimum score is 150. Turned out with a calving ease bull at 15 months, should calve when they're 2 years old.

Big girls with big butts don't always have a big pelvis.

What kind of measurements are you getting? I was always taught 140sqcm @ 13mos old.
I pelvic measure mine at 9-10mos. A little young, but that's when I freeze brand. Anything under 132sqcm I rechecked 3mos later. If they don't pass then they go to the feedlot.
The only breed that I have seen consistently measure huge is beef Shorthorns

With a score of 150 a heifer should theoretically have a 72 lb calf unassisted. I use a high calving ease bull on my heifers and calves generally range from 65 - 80 lbs, depending on the heifer. This year my heifers averaged 181; one of them scored a whopping 232 (baby's got back!!).

This is a good explanation of pelvic measurements from the University of Arkansas:
https://www.uaex.edu/publications/PDF/FSA-3010.pdf

Thank you for all the great info. I have always gone off of the instruction book that came with my Rice Pelvomiter.
If memory serves me right, when we used to measure @ 13 mos, and had hfrs measuring 180 and above we ended up with some mighty big 1,800lb + mature cows. I've culled my average mature cow weight down to 1,400lbs. They just cost so much less to feed, and our avg finished steer weights haven't decreased.

What is your average mature cow weight?
 

TCRanch

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SBMF 2015 said:
TCRanch said:
SBMF 2015 said:
What kind of measurements are you getting? I was always taught 140sqcm @ 13mos old.
I pelvic measure mine at 9-10mos. A little young, but that's when I freeze brand. Anything under 132sqcm I rechecked 3mos later. If they don't pass then they go to the feedlot.
The only breed that I have seen consistently measure huge is beef Shorthorns

With a score of 150 a heifer should theoretically have a 72 lb calf unassisted. I use a high calving ease bull on my heifers and calves generally range from 65 - 80 lbs, depending on the heifer. This year my heifers averaged 181; one of them scored a whopping 232 (baby's got back!!).

This is a good explanation of pelvic measurements from the University of Arkansas:
https://www.uaex.edu/publications/PDF/FSA-3010.pdf

Thank you for all the great info. I have always gone off of the instruction book that came with my Rice Pelvomiter.
If memory serves me right, when we used to measure @ 13 mos, and had hfrs measuring 180 and above we ended up with some mighty big 1,800lb + mature cows. I've culled my average mature cow weight down to 1,400lbs. They just cost so much less to feed, and our avg finished steer weights haven't decreased.

What is your average mature cow weight?

Too much! Or at least they used to be. Was not uncommon to have 1800+ with Steamroller topping the chart at 2300, 8 months bred (per our vet - couldn't even work her in the chute). I've culled most of our oldest cows but still have probably 10 in the 1600-1800 range and they're primarily the Angus/Hereford. Played around with the CED's of my bulls and finally decided +11 on my heifers is a good balance of ease, weight & growth and +7 on the cows results in avg. 80 lb calves, great growth and is reflected in the heifers I retain but doesn't result in the aforementioned scale busters.
 
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