Brahman Cattle

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Anonymous

I have been breeding Brahman cattle for 30 years and would not change to another Tropical breed as these cattle perform superbly in hot or cold climates. Brahmans from the USA over the last few years have in many cases ruined the temperament of the good Australian Brahman. They have helped somewhat to increase the gene pool of Brahmans in our country. I had a dabble with a high Indu content American blood bull he ruined the good temperament of my cattle. I now have the good temperament back in my herd by using one infusion of a predominately Australian blood bull. What a relief to have that quietness back. Our Australian cattle are much more hardier than USA cattle .They are less pampered throughout the tough seasons that we endure here. Any other Australians with a similar experience? Some of the cattle imported to Australia from the USA were an absolute disgrace. Some Australians were very gullible when they went to buy them. The Yanks seen them coming!

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A

Anonymous

> I have been breeding Brahman
> cattle for 30 years and would not
> change to another Tropical breed
> as these cattle perform superbly
> in hot or cold climates. Brahmans
> from the USA over the last few
> years have in many cases ruined
> the temperament of the good
> Australian Brahman. They have
> helped somewhat to increase the
> gene pool of Brahmans in our
> country. I had a dabble with a
> high Indu content American blood
> bull he ruined the good
> temperament of my cattle. I now
> have the good temperament back in
> my herd by using one infusion of a
> predominately Australian blood
> bull. What a relief to have that
> quietness back. Our Australian
> cattle are much more hardier than
> USA cattle .They are less pampered
> throughout the tough seasons that
> we endure here. Any other
> Australians with a similar
> experience? Some of the cattle
> imported to Australia from the USA
> were an absolute disgrace. Some
> Australians were very gullible
> when they went to buy them. The
> Yanks seen them coming! I am not a Australian but i love my USA Brahmans.
 
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A

Anonymous

And too many of them think Brahmas are supposed to be wild and crazy. The idiots!

dun

> i thank you are right i am from
> eastern okla and have alot the
> same problam. they are to meny
> rich hobby ranchers that produce
> or breeding stock .
 
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A

Anonymous

> And too many of them think Brahmas
> are supposed to be wild and crazy.
> The idiots!

> dun

those idiots are probly the same ones that think TX Longhorns are "wild and crazy."



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Anonymous

> those idiots are probly the same
> ones that think TX Longhorns are
> "wild and crazy." I see ads for kids wanting show steers, calves. why not the GIR, they are the gentlest, and for beef or dairy. and they are very inexpensive for what they are. Don't let these wonderful kind creatures be a repeat of times gone past of the buffalo, and the longhorn. Remember where the wonderful brahma came from. thanks bev

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A

Anonymous

Here Here, I totally agree Brahman cattle especially Gyr type are the gentlest and most intelligent cattle. My Brahman cattle which mostly are Gyr type are so quiet. In Australia I often still hear Brahmans referred to as Yaks. That is an insult. The Brahman breed in Australia has done more for the advancement of the beef industry in our country than any other breed.It has been good to see all the other breeds that have come to our country. Their introduction has not harmed our industry. Bets Wishes Colin

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Anonymous

Colin, I believe that the brahma is to the world as the buffalo was to the indian. Food for the family, hides for clothes and robes, bones for tools. The brahma offers milk, beef, and an animal to be used as oxen in some countries. The introduction of the Gyr into the american cattle has only improved our breeds. Of course that is only my opinion. I do not raise big herds of cattle. I have some show cattle, and some riding cattle, and a buffalo baby on a bottle that God willin I will ride him in the future. But I do try to study and familiarize myself with all breeds. I do think angus have one great quality, they all have "Betty Davis Eyes" and that does give them a wonderful kindness to their expression

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A

Anonymous

hello ranchers, i am looking for a brahman breeders to buy some bred cows some where within 250miles of southern minnesota. e-mail with response thank you



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Anonymous

Colin,

The big problem with many of the bulls from all exported to Australia is that they are showring cattle and have no business in range or other tough conditions. I do not have much experience with Brahman cattle but the charolais bulls that work well in Australia from the U.S. tend to be rancher type cattle rather than the ones that win Denver. A bull called Mr. Perfect is an excellent example. he is not the best looking animal but he does put out cattle that do well in harsh conditions. Other bulls are out their in every breed that are in the same boat. If you are looking for a breed that can compliment your brahmans consider the Tarentaise. These animals breed even easier than your South Devons, milk well, grow like a good angus, and show good adoptation to hot conditions in India and North Africa. They improve maternal traits with out increasing mature size (MARC data)check out the Ankeman Ranch for more details at: <A HREF="http://www.ankenmanranch.com/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.ankenmanranch.com/</A> Let me know what you think.

Mark

> I have been breeding Brahman
> cattle for 30 years and would not
> change to another Tropical breed
> as these cattle perform superbly
> in hot or cold climates. Brahmans
> from the USA over the last few
> years have in many cases ruined
> the temperament of the good
> Australian Brahman. They have
> helped somewhat to increase the
> gene pool of Brahmans in our
> country. I had a dabble with a
> high Indu content American blood
> bull he ruined the good
> temperament of my cattle. I now
> have the good temperament back in
> my herd by using one infusion of a
> predominately Australian blood
> bull. What a relief to have that
> quietness back. Our Australian
> cattle are much more hardier than
> USA cattle .They are less pampered
> throughout the tough seasons that
> we endure here. Any other
> Australians with a similar
> experience? Some of the cattle
> imported to Australia from the USA
> were an absolute disgrace. Some
> Australians were very gullible
> when they went to buy them. The
> Yanks seen them coming!



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A

Anonymous

> Colin,

> The big problem with many of the
> bulls from all exported to
> Australia is that they are
> showring cattle and have no
> business in range or other tough
> conditions. I do not have much
> experience with Brahman cattle but
> the charolais bulls that work well
> in Australia from the U.S. tend to
> be rancher type cattle rather than
> the ones that win Denver. A bull
> called Mr. Perfect is an excellent
> example. he is not the best
> looking animal but he does put out
> cattle that do well in harsh
> conditions. Other bulls are out
> their in every breed that are in
> the same boat. If you are looking
> for a breed that can compliment
> your brahmans consider the
> Tarentaise. These animals breed
> even easier than your South
> Devons, milk well, grow like a
> good angus, and show good
> adoptation to hot conditions in
> India and North Africa. They
> improve maternal traits with out
> increasing mature size (MARC
> data)check out the Ankeman Ranch
> for more details at:
> <A HREF="http://www.ankenmanranch.com/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.ankenmanranch.com/</A> Let
> me know what you think.

> Mark Mark thanks for the suggestion. Had a look very impressed with the cattle I saw. They would cross well with Brahman and probably South Devon. Colin

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A. delaGarza

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Colin,
Please excuse my ignorance but I don't know how a Brahman Gyr(Gir) type looks like. I know Gyr, Guzerat , Nelore, Indubrazil, Sardo Negro and Brahman because my family has been breeding them since almost 60 years ago in the Gulf of Mexico coast shoreline just South of the Tropic of Cancer, but I have never herd of a Brahman Gyr type. If you ment that your Brahmans are Domeheaded and Longeared your Brahman does not look like the true American Brahmans. Maybe you mean a Gir cattle that is part of the Cebu (Zebu, Bos Indicus family), because Brahman is a breed that was developed in USA that is part of this family too.


Colin Chevalley":2flaoatu said:
Here Here, I totally agree Brahman cattle especially Gyr type are the gentlest and most intelligent cattle. My Brahman cattle which mostly are Gyr type are so quiet. In Australia I often still hear Brahmans referred to as Yaks. That is an insult. The Brahman breed in Australia has done more for the advancement of the beef industry in our country than any other breed.It has been good to see all the other breeds that have come to our country. Their introduction has not harmed our industry. Bets Wishes Colin

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fugley

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I have some grey brahman cows and some red brahman heifers and one adult red bull. Some of my red heifers are kind of dome headed and very long eared, but they are also very stout and beefy. I have one pure foundation gyr heifer that I am breeding to my bull (sophistaced millionaire breeding) he is very stout and also shows alot of the indu influence in his head and ears. I am hoping to get some refinement, but also some good conformation. I also have one foundation gyr bull calf, and one gyr-grey brahman cross, they are almost identical except the gyr has of course more dome to his head. I love them though, they are the greatest and the sweetest. I agree that all are not lap cattle, but they are kind.
 

A. delaGarza

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In my personal opinion first Gyr and second Indubrazil breeds are the niciest of the Bos Indicus cattle and one of the nicier of all the world breeds. First the Hump and second the Gir because it's domehead and ears and Indubrazil because of the long pendulous ears.


fugley":2ot4tzfj said:
I have some grey brahman cows and some red brahman heifers and one adult red bull. Some of my red heifers are kind of dome headed and very long eared, but they are also very stout and beefy. I have one pure foundation gyr heifer that I am breeding to my bull (sophistaced millionaire breeding) he is very stout and also shows alot of the indu influence in his head and ears. I am hoping to get some refinement, but also some good conformation. I also have one foundation gyr bull calf, and one gyr-grey brahman cross, they are almost identical except the gyr has of course more dome to his head. I love them though, they are the greatest and the sweetest. I agree that all are not lap cattle, but they are kind.
 
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A

Anonymous

Colin Chevalley":31lofban said:
> Colin,

> The big problem with many of the
> bulls from all exported to
> Australia is that they are
> showring cattle and have no
> business in range or other tough
> conditions. I do not have much
> experience with Brahman cattle but
> the charolais bulls that work well
> in Australia from the U.S. tend to
> be rancher type cattle rather than
> the ones that win Denver. A bull
> called Mr. Perfect is an excellent
> example. he is not the best
> looking animal but he does put out
> cattle that do well in harsh
> conditions. Other bulls are out
> their in every breed that are in
> the same boat. If you are looking
> for a breed that can compliment
> your brahmans consider the
> Tarentaise. These animals breed
> even easier than your South
> Devons, milk well, grow like a
> good angus, and show good
> adoptation to hot conditions in
> India and North Africa. They
> improve maternal traits with out
> increasing mature size (MARC
> data)check out the Ankeman Ranch
> for more details at:
> <A HREF="http://www.ankenmanranch.com/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.ankenmanranch.com/</A> Let
> me know what you think.

> Mark Mark thanks for the suggestion. Had a look very impressed with the cattle I saw. They would cross well with Brahman and probably South Devon. Colin

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Colin,
I have read some of your posts and I agree with you on almost all areas. Having said that I'm sure you realize that not every animal will work in every area, and on every mating. Since you do not like E.P.D.'S (and I agree with you) you do not think that the show ring is a valid way to appraise cattle (I dont agree) What way do you think an elite bull should be exposed to other breeders. I have raised national champion bulls in the U.S. and Canada. Some have contributed greatly some have not.Some have done very well in some areas while others wouldn't.While I think you and I would agree In the way we would visually appraise cattle,we might not agree in the areas our cows need improvement.I think you will agree that E.P.D.s are only another marketing tool and most people that are in favor of them dont trust their own visual appraisal or are in the bull promotion business at the expense if the bulls individual qualities.For me it is easier to know that the show cattle have been equally pushed as hard as they can be, you can evaluate the results. Then making your selections of an animal you like you can trust or not what the owner tells you about age, birthweight, mother,etc. Just use common sense.
awaiting your reply,
Mike
 

Colin Chevalley

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Thanks for the reply.
Showring cattle often don't truly reflect how well they do out in the paddock. They are force fed often being on feed from weaning till their sold as a two or three year old. I have had Brahman bulls that once they go out in the paddock after a show they just melt. Off to market they go.
Here in Australia we have really nothing to benchmark our cattle so basically it has to be the showring. We enter cattle (unled) in prime cattle shows as well as our stud classes.
It makes me laugh that we cannot enter stud cattle in the prime classes as they are deemed to be better than commercial cattle. Shouldn't every cattle breeder be aiming at breeding the highest quality animal. Papers do not make the beast.
Here in Australia to get an animal up into the register of renown,would cost many thousands of dollars and many many miles of travel to accredited shows.
Brahman cow of the year in 2003,was a Hudgins blood cow that has been flushed and flushed. Here daughters and sons were shown from Sydney to Cairns which is most of the way up the eastern seaboard of Australia.
Here progeny were very impressive like peas in a pod. There were as good as cattle as these shown by other breeders, but because an influential judge or two had put these cattle up it seemed like all the wanna bees in the judging world did the same.
These days here in Australia if you don't have a grey Hudgins type animal you won't win.
My experience and from observance they are great showring cattle at an early age,but often don't breed on. I've attempted to break in Hudgins blood cattle by a bull that was resold here in Australia for $105,000. They had shocking temperament.
I love showing but know it has little relevance to the commercial cattle breeder. When it boils down to it,its only the judge on the days' choice.
Colin
 

A. delaGarza

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Location
N.E. Mexico &amp; Deep South Texas
have you tried Brahmans from Mexico or Brazil, maybe you should take a look, you will be surprise.


Colin Chevalley":1167zx8x said:
Thanks for the reply.
Showring cattle often don't truly reflect how well they do out in the paddock. They are force fed often being on feed from weaning till their sold as a two or three year old. I have had Brahman bulls that once they go out in the paddock after a show they just melt. Off to market they go.
Here in Australia we have really nothing to benchmark our cattle so basically it has to be the showring. We enter cattle (unled) in prime cattle shows as well as our stud classes.
It makes me laugh that we cannot enter stud cattle in the prime classes as they are deemed to be better than commercial cattle. Shouldn't every cattle breeder be aiming at breeding the highest quality animal. Papers do not make the beast.
Here in Australia to get an animal up into the register of renown,would cost many thousands of dollars and many many miles of travel to accredited shows.
Brahman cow of the year in 2003,was a Hudgins blood cow that has been flushed and flushed. Here daughters and sons were shown from Sydney to Cairns which is most of the way up the eastern seaboard of Australia.
Here progeny were very impressive like peas in a pod. There were as good as cattle as these shown by other breeders, but because an influential judge or two had put these cattle up it seemed like all the wanna bees in the judging world did the same.
These days here in Australia if you don't have a grey Hudgins type animal you won't win.
My experience and from observance they are great showring cattle at an early age,but often don't breed on. I've attempted to break in Hudgins blood cattle by a bull that was resold here in Australia for $105,000. They had shocking temperament.
I love showing but know it has little relevance to the commercial cattle breeder. When it boils down to it,its only the judge on the days' choice.
Colin
 

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