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Bloat

dun

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To prevent it you can feed a block that is a bloat preventer. If it's already there, you can stick them in the rumen, pass a hose into the rumen and vent the gas, or if frothy bloat, a little dish washing detergent ot mineral out will help

dun

herefordobsessed":2pwt33ug said:
What can I do to get rid of bloat.
 

MrBilly

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We are treating bloat all the time it seems. :roll:

We have a very high percentage of Durana clover in our fescue fields. After reading about what goes into those bloat blocks (derivatives from making polyehtylene, etc), I decided not to feed that to my cattle. We check them two or three times per day, bring up the one who is begining to bloat, put in the chute. Pass a Frick speculum into back of the throat (this is very important, or they will chew holes into your tubing- or worse :oops: ) and through it pass a stomach tube, release the gas by pressing on the rumen, then pump in 1 gallon of water contiaing 1 cup of Tide(for cows) OR I have used a couple ounces of Dawn soap, followed by a pint or more of mineral oil. Run them around a bit, take off the pasture and feed hay for a couple days and then return them to pasture and hope for the best. I have one calf that has now bloated one time after another , so he needs to take a ride next week. :cboy:
 

dun

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One place we had was just south of a dry lake. Whenever the wind would blow from the north we would have a white out from the various dusts, one of which was arsenic. We would get a cow that would bloat so I made a maple block about 8 inches long 2 inches square and drilled a hole through it large enough to pass a garden hose. Same deal as using the speculum, but I had thw maple-didn't have a seculum. If they were already down we stuck them with a trocar and cannula and pumped soap in through the cannula. We found that those that bloated from the dust once would bloat everytime we got dusted. When we wacked them, or if one died before I could get to it, we found that the joints where calcified like an old animal, even though it may only be a calf, and the liver was covered with lesions. UC Davis studied it for a couple of years and pretty much left just scratching their heads.

dun


MrBilly":2xvclym9 said:
We are treating bloat all the time it seems. :roll:

We have a very high percentage of Durana clover in our fescue fields. After reading about what goes into those bloat blocks (derivatives from making polyehtylene, etc), I decided not to feed that to my cattle. We check them two or three times per day, bring up the one who is begining to bloat, put in the chute. Pass a Frick speculum into back of the throat (this is very important, or they will chew holes into your tubing- or worse :oops: ) and through it pass a stomach tube, release the gas by pressing on the rumen, then pump in 1 gallon of water contiaing 1 cup of Tide(for cows) OR I have used a couple ounces of Dawn soap, followed by a pint or more of mineral oil. Run them around a bit, take off the pasture and feed hay for a couple days and then return them to pasture and hope for the best. I have one calf that has now bloated one time after another , so he needs to take a ride next week. :cboy:
 

taranr2002

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First I would try pouring some baking soda in the mouth it will reduce the gasses, and try to get it walking, this is inexpensive and has worked very good for us.
 

Stocker Steve

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taranr2002":2nwl6nof said:
First I would try pouring some baking soda in the mouth it will reduce the gasses, and try to get it walking, this is inexpensive and has worked very good for us.

Are there cattle down in the field or in a chute when you treat them?
How much baking soda into the mouth seems to be needed?
 

kyblockhead

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To the best of my knowledge, there are only 2 bloat blocks available on the market. Sweetlix makes both of them. They are effective when they are made available prior to the cattle being put into a bloat condition so they are well adjusted and then keep them on the blocks while bloat is a threat. Certainly, this is a better option than finding them dead or treating animals over and over. Both substances are approved by FDA.
 

Texas PaPaw

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Stocker Steve":37u744y8 said:
taranr2002":37u744y8 said:
First I would try pouring some baking soda in the mouth it will reduce the gasses, and try to get it walking, this is inexpensive and has worked very good for us.

Are there cattle down in the field or in a chute when you treat them?
How much baking soda into the mouth seems to be needed?

120 cc of liquid detergent squirted in the back of mouth by a syringe with no needle will relieve the bloat in 15-20 minutes. Cheap & easy to do with chute or headgate.

Good luck & happy trails.

Brock
 

Stocker Steve

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I have heard of people mixing Tide with their loose mineral, but the liquid detergent treatment is new to me. Good tip!

I used block blocks for a while last year, but did not replace them and saw no difference in the cattle. The good doers still had a double bloat following a paddock shift but we able to walk it off. Lots of fine print in using blocks - - no. of days of block usage before legume consumption, no. of head per block, no other mineral, spacing blocks in the pasture... I do not think bloat blocks are the universal solution that some make them out to be.

I tried to get my feed guy to try putting "Bloatguard" into my suppplement but he is resisting.

Steve
 

cypressfarms

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Stupid question......Are certain breeds more prone to bloat? I ask this because of some personal observations through the years.
 

Stocker Steve

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cypressfarms":1ij0rgxk said:
Stupid question......Are certain breeds more prone to bloat? I ask this because of some personal observations through the years.

My growthy cattle are more prone to bloat since they eat just plan eat more. My growthy cattle are usually are usually continental crosses.

I have heard of "chronic bloaters" but have not owned one yet.
 

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