• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Banding bull calves at older age

Help Support CattleToday:

Devin

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
120
Reaction score
0
All of my cows calve during September and October with the bull going back in on November 20th. I was working alot of overtime at my off farm job during calving and did not get the bulls banded as I normally do. The calves are about 400lbs now. I was thinking of buying a larger bander and banding them after weaning as I background them through the early summer when the grass greens up. I have never used one of these banders and was wondering which one some of you might think is best as in easiest to use, most durable etc. Also, once they are banded approximately how long does it take for the band to do it's job? Any advice is appreciated.
 

larryshoat

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
3,475
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
In my opinion the only bander to buy is the Callicrate . I assume you mean by "do it's job" fall off, about a month .

Larry
 
OP
D

Devin

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
120
Reaction score
0
Yep, thats what I meant. Thanks for the quick reply Larry.
 

Stocker Steve

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
10,475
Reaction score
134
Location
Central Minnesota
Texas PaPaw":263hxv24 said:
Devin

I use the california bander. It works well and is a lot cheaper than the calicrate. Also, after applying the band, I make an incision in the bottom of the scrotum. This make them dry up and fall off in half the time. Usually 10-14 days.

Just a small incision for drainage?
 

larryshoat

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
3,475
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
Texas PaPaw":llph7ytt said:
Devin

I use the california bander. It works well and is a lot cheaper than the calicrate. Also, after applying the band, I make an incision in the bottom of the scrotum. This make them dry up and fall off in half the time. Usually 10-14 days.

Here's a link for this bander.

http://www.livestockconcepts.com/CaliforniaBander.html

If that works for you that's fine, obviously you have the skill to use it . The times that I have seen people in trouble is where they didn't have the band tight enough, I've seen cattle needlessly lost this way . The callicrate has a built in indicator that shows when the band is tight enough . If you're getting along with something else, that's great, but I think more people will get along with the more expensive tool JMHO .

Larry
 
OP
D

Devin

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
120
Reaction score
0
Thanks for the replies. Both of the units look good to me. I do like the feature that tells you when the band is tight enough. I just don't trust myself not to screw up and kill one or two. The extra money spent would probably be worth it in my case. Thanks for the tip on the incision as well. Do you guys give a tentanus shot when doing this? Thanks in advance.
Devin
 

I luv herfrds

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2007
Messages
5,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Montana
Helped a guy do his and we gave them a tetnus shot. Cut the sacs off 2 weeks later and gave them another set of shots.
 

larryshoat

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
3,475
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
I do a little different than most people, I use the tetanus antitoxin instead of the tetanus toxoid . I think for the toxoid you would need to get 2 rounds of that in them prior to castrating to have immunity, the antitoxin is for treatment of tetanus . I also give a shot of penicillin with the antitoxin, cut the sac off after 48 hours, in other words we treat as if they already have tetanus .In the end it's up to you and your vet to decide what is right . What I have described is what works best for me, I hope it helps .

Larry
 

Texas PaPaw

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2005
Messages
1,249
Reaction score
1
Location
Central Texas
Stocker Steve":apj85kep said:
Texas PaPaw":apj85kep said:
Devin

I use the california bander. It works well and is a lot cheaper than the calicrate. Also, after applying the band, I make an incision in the bottom of the scrotum. This make them dry up and fall off in half the time. Usually 10-14 days.

Just a small incision for drainage?

Actually the incision is to let the nuts dry out faster. The intact scrotum slows the drying of the nuts. I do give tetnus toxoid at the same time. Toxoid is what the bander mfg. recommends.

A simple test for tightness is attempting to get your index finger between the band and scrotum after application. If you can easily get your finger in there it is not tight enough. Getting them this tight has never been a problem for me. If one were banding many head at a time your arms might get a little tired and I suppose the tightness might decline. For those banding large numbers the callicrate would probably give a more uniform tightness and be less tireing. I don't have anything against the callicrate bander but the california bander has worked well for me along with the cost saving. Have done 500+ head over the past few years without a problem.
 

preston39

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Messages
1,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Kentucky, Smithland
Our 500-550# commercial calve buyers REQUIRES knife castration 30-45 days before purchase...or the animal is discounted. The exlanation is that the feeder lot uses the scrotum as a gauge of carcass fat content and then they are able to adjust the intake values. The only time we adjust the time frame is if/when an individual animal begins developing the traditional bull type facial features..then we castrate him early.

I might point out that castration is... a one trip....process.

We castrate with the sign in the left knee...going down. Never had a bleeder,infection or any other residual side effect.

Your production may be discounted without you realizing it. Suggest you check with your purchase source.
 

msscamp

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
10,701
Reaction score
0
Location
Wyoming
larryshoat":2yxdwwv2 said:
I think for the toxoid you would need to get 2 rounds of that in them prior to castrating to have immunity, the antitoxin is for treatment of tetanus .
Larry

No, that is not true. The toxoid takes about 10 days to build immunity, but one injection will protect against tetanus. I've used the toxoid with my goats, and we've used also used it with banded bulls that vary in age from 7 months to a year old. No problems in any of them.
 

angus9259

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
2,840
Reaction score
0
Location
Michigan
This is the first year I've done it. I bought an XL bander. Probably would have bought the calicrate but it seemed more complicated AND more expensive at the time. The XL bander worked fine for me though. I used it on a bigger (650 lb) bull. Sack took a long time to fall off, but it didn't seem to bother him at all so I didn't let it bother me. I used toxoid because the manufacturer insisted and specifically said NOT to use antitoxin. That's the only basis I have.
 

jt

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 9, 2004
Messages
1,278
Reaction score
0
i have used the california bander several times and i like it. i give a tet shot 30 days prior to banding and another at banding. my understanding is that it is not until the second shot that you actually have protection.

jt
 
OP
D

Devin

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
120
Reaction score
0
Thanks for all of the info. I have never let my bull calves go and not castrated them because we like to sell in the select sales. I should have made time when they hit the ground to do it back in the fall, but whats done is done. I'm gonna give this a try. Thanks again for all of the input.
Devin
 

larryshoat

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
3,475
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
msscamp":9p1dxxs2 said:
larryshoat":9p1dxxs2 said:
I think for the toxoid you would need to get 2 rounds of that in them prior to castrating to have immunity, the antitoxin is for treatment of tetanus .
Larry

No, that is not true. The toxoid takes about 10 days to build immunity, but one injection will protect against tetanus. I've used the toxoid with my goats, and we've used also used it with banded bulls that vary in age from 7 months to a year old. No problems in any of them.



TETANUS TOXOID-CONCENTRATED

Colorado Serum

Tetanus Toxoid

U.S. Vet. Lic. No.: 188

Active Ingredient(s): Prepared by detoxifying tetanus toxin with a formaldehyde solution and moderate heat in such a manner that the antigenic properties remain intact.

The product is refined to remove most of the nonspecific components and concentrated to provide a low dose effective immunizing agent.

Each serial is tested for purity, safety, and potency in accordance with the applicable standard requirements issued by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Contains thimerosal as a preservative.

Indications: For the vaccination of cattle, horses, sheep, goats and swine against tetanus.

Dosage and Administration: The toxoid requires three (3) to four (4) weeks to establish an effective level of protection and should be used only in non-emergency instances. Booster injections should be made annually or at the time of injury regardless of interval.

Inject intramuscularly as follows:

For horses and cattle, at least two (2) doses of 1 mL each.

For sheep, goats and swine, two (2) doses of 0.5 mL each. The interval between doses should be approximately 30 days. Revaccinate all animals retained for breeding and those held beyond the normal marketing period annually. Use the full dose as recommended above.

Precaution(s): Shake well before using. Store in the dark at 2-7°C.

Sterilize syringes and needles by boiling in clean water.

Caution(s): Transitory local reaction may appear at the site of administration.

Anaphylaxis (shock) may sometimes follow the use of products of this nature. Epinephrine, or an equivalent drug, should be available for immediate use in these instances.

Use the entire contents when first opened. For veterinary use only.

Warning(s): Do not vaccinate within 21 days before slaughter.

Discussion: Tetanus is caused by a toxin (poison) produced by the growth of Clostridium tetani, an anaerobic (lives without air) micro-organism that may be carried into the wounds or sites of surgical operations.

Affected animals become stiff, have great difficulty swallowing and the pulse rate is increased. Breathing is labored. Spasmodic contractions of the muscle system occurs, extending muscles of the jaw. Thus, the term lockjaw is frequently applied. Legs are often spread, the tail is stiff with the abdominal muscles retracted. Tetanus stricken animals may be unusually sensitive to light and heat. The temperature of the animal generally remains normal, elevating only shortly before death.

Presentation: 10 x 1 dose (10 x 1 mL) and 10 dose (10 mL) vials.

Larry
 
Top