Spurs...

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Spurs or not

  • I use spurs.

    Votes: 8 47.1%
  • I don't use them.

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • Sometimes.

    Votes: 5 29.4%

  • Total voters
    17
  • Poll closed .

Angus Cowman

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I use them all the time
If a person knows how to use spurs they are a great training aid for an individual that doesn't they are a cruel form of punishment for the horse
Back when I was riding alot of colts I started all of them with spurs
the horse will be alot more attentive and work off of cues alot more with just a slight touch from a set of spurs if used correctly
I taught my kids how to use spurs and how not to use them I wish everyone that wore them had been taught this lesson
 
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warpaint

warpaint

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Angus Cowman":3vfnih7j said:
I use them all the time
If a person knows how to use spurs they are a great training aid for an individual that doesn't they are a cruel form of punishment for the horse
Back when I was riding alot of colts I started all of them with spurs
the horse will be alot more attentive and work off of cues alot more with just a slight touch from a set of spurs if used correctly
I taught my kids how to use spurs and how not to use them I wish everyone that wore them had been taught this lesson

I agree.

I've got one gelding that I don't use spurs on. If I tried to, he would come out from under me. The rest get the spurs.
 

3waycross

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I use my best common sense and avoid horses altogether. Virtually everything I have that hurts ofr doesn't work right today is the result of getting wrong with some jugheaded scrap of horseflesh.

If I need some horseback work done I know plenty of kids who like that stuff that I can call.

My Dad asked me the other day which ones of his horses I wanted if something happened to him. I told him not to worry I would just dig a big hole and bury them with him.
 

hayray

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Spurs are an important component of horse training. The blunt heel of a boot requires too much force to be applied from the leg, this does a couple of things - often causes the rider to artificially move the leg out of the proper position by exaggerating use of the leg, and then also slows the timing of application of the leg down and usually puts the riders timing behind that of the horse. Just more efficient to use them. Alot people obviously get by with out them but it is a compromise of time, efficiency and responsiveness.
 

Angus Cowman

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hayray":1ag2uln5 said:
Spurs are an important component of horse training. The blunt heel of a boot requires too much force to be applied from the leg, this does a couple of things - often causes the rider to artificially move the leg out of the proper position by exaggerating use of the leg, and then also slows the timing of application of the leg down and usually puts the riders timing behind that of the horse. Just more efficient to use them. Alot people obviously get by with out them but it is a compromise of time, efficiency and responsiveness.
Very well said
 

peg4x4

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Like any piece of equiptment used on an animal there is the right way to use them and then there is the wrong way.
 

spinandslide

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as with any training tool, it can be abused when used incorrectly. Spurs are merely extensions of your leg..used properly, they are great.

Interestingly..you can wear spurs and not ever have to use them. ;-)
 

angie1

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talldog":2fyze4r8 said:
msscamp":2fyze4r8 said:
warpaint":2fyze4r8 said:
Just wondering how many still use spurs when riding.

Spurs were never used on our place - there was no need for them.
That's MY vote !! NEVER needed them----- :tiphat:
I am wondering if you trained horses? They can be a very useful tool when teaching leg cuing and maintaining a gait ~ they do not need to be used as a punishment, and should not be used as a punishment. Just like a lot of things, can be very functional if used properly.
 

msscamp

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angie":2rq6hesa said:
talldog":2rq6hesa said:
msscamp":2rq6hesa said:
Spurs were never used on our place - there was no need for them.
That's MY vote !! NEVER needed them----- :tiphat:
I am wondering if you trained horses? They can be a very useful tool when teaching leg cuing and maintaining a gait ~ they do not need to be used as a punishment, and should not be used as a punishment. Just like a lot of things, can be very functional if used properly.

I guess that depends on what you mean by 'training'. Yes, I've saddle-broken a foal or two in my lifetime. I've also had the task of taking a greenbroke horse or on to well-broke following purchase. I've never used spurs on any of them, nor did my father or any other member of my family ride with spurs. Somehow or another, we always seemed to end up with responsive, well-mannered horses. Now, do I consider myself to be an 'expert' on horses, or believe for one moment that I am a qualified 'horse-trainer'? Hell no!!!!! I do know one thing, though - all of the training aids in the world will never, ever take the place of wet saddle blankets.
 

LazyARanch

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Reading this topic brought back a very distinct memory of when I was younger and would throw a leg across anything with hair! (not that I was a very good rider, mind you, just that I was young and DUMB!)

I never learned to ride with spurs, never learned how to use them so I didn't use them at all. BUT... I had a good buckskin gelding that I would ride and show in a lot of different things in our local club shows. I was starting him in barrels and he was getting a fairly good handle on the pattern, just needed a bit more speed. An old rough horseman told me "Girly, just get urself a pair of spurs and give him a good pop on that turn home and he'll run fer ya!"

I thought, "OHHHH OKKKKK" (yes I am blonde!!)

so I got a pair of cheap slide-on strapless spurs with some jab to them and tried them on my next ride.

1st barrel, doing pretty good, 2nd barrel even a bit better... here we GO!! Nice tight turn around the 3rd barrel and then WHOOPEE I poked him with both heels and started doing the HEEEEYAAAAA thing to run home and WHAM!!!!

ugggghhhh.... found myself laying on my back flat out gasping for air and people standing over me, along with my gelding, who had a very "injured expression" on his face!! Bystanders said I did the purtiest flight through the air along with a nice somersault....scored me an 8 in technique! hehe :mrgreen: Was the LAST DANG time I tried spurs!!

I know they most certainly have their place, but I'd say their place is on the heels of MUCH more experienced horsemen and women than I !! :clap: :lol: :D
 

L.A.

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Spurs,, If your riding bulls, they work as a extra grip. Rowels locked.
On saddle broncs or barebacks they are for raking and increasing the buck or maybe for show.
For saddle horses, especially newbies, it's simply a cue. The spur used right gives a tickle, NOT A GOUGE!!!.
Tickles are what several posters use,(makes us giggle). Gougers, usally get banned quickly.
Come on Mss, you know several you would allow to ride your horses wearing spurs.
L.A.
 
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warpaint

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I have a bay and white Spotted Saddle that I got last winter. He's 6 yr. old and hadn't been ridden in quite some time. The first time up, we had us a come apart. Bucked, snorted, sunfished and behaved in a undesirable manner all together.

Next time I got on him, he wouldn't do squat. My oldest daughter got on him and he acted great for her. Long story short, everybody in the family could ride him but me. He would stand stock still. Put on a pair of spurs, and he's a whole other animal. I don't have to use them, just let him know I'm wearing them and he does anything I want.
 

hayray

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I would guess that the reason that the horse does not respond well for you is that it is more use of the aids type of thing. Maybe the other riders sit lighter and more balanced and keep the legs off the horses and maybe you are sitting heavy with your legs already on the the horse gripping and the horse is balky against your constant active aids. When you are using the spurs it is imitating the on and off action of the aids, however using the spurs as a substitute for over active leg aid will eventually make the horse dull to the spurs also. I have no idea if this is what you are doing but I have seen the exact same thing many times. Our well trained horses cannot be rode well by novice riders and seem dull and un-responsive compared to when a well trained rider gets on them. One way to double check if you are over riding with active aids is see if you are gripping with your lower leg all the time and if you are slouching in the saddle and sitting back on your butt, you should not be. You should be sitting more like you stand with a decent amount of weight in your stirrups and sitting straight up, and also see if you are riding accidentially with your hands and arms up in the air too much. All those things can make a horse back off and not go forth or otherwise called balky.
 
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warpaint

warpaint

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hayray":2m0mos0w said:
I would guess that the reason that the horse does not respond well for you is that it is more use of the aids type of thing. Maybe the other riders sit lighter and more balanced and keep the legs off the horses and maybe you are sitting heavy with your legs already on the the horse gripping and the horse is balky against your constant active aids. When you are using the spurs it is imitating the on and off action of the aids, however using the spurs as a substitute for over active leg aid will eventually make the horse dull to the spurs also. I have no idea if this is what you are doing but I have seen the exact same thing many times. Our well trained horses cannot be rode well by novice riders and seem dull and un-responsive compared to when a well trained rider gets on them. One way to double check if you are over riding with active aids is see if you are gripping with your lower leg all the time and if you are slouching in the saddle and sitting back on your butt, you should not be. You should be sitting more like you stand with a decent amount of weight in your stirrups and sitting straight up, and also see if you are riding accidentially with your hands and arms up in the air too much. All those things can make a horse back off and not go forth or otherwise called balky.

Although your advice is appreciated, I was using this as an example of the use of spurs. This particular horse was trained with spurs and I forgot to mention that all the others that rode him were wearing them. ;-)
 

cypressfarms

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I have a really nice paint gelding that I bought when he was young (3 years old). He had only been ridden in a small corral by very small kids. The gelding did not "know" how to run. He was and still is very well behaved but would only walk. A close relative of mine who trains horses took him in for me and said that the only way he could get the gelding to trot, canter or gallop was to spur him. That was 5 years ago. Since he has "learned" to run, I haven't had a need to spur since, and don't wear them when I ride him now. I did wear them at first, but he knew they were there and that was enough to keep his attention. I tend to think that spurs, like almost anything else, should be done with moderation.
 

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