Speeco from TSC and Rhino S300 PHD

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jcummins

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Been researching phd....need to buy one. Trying to find a used one, but giving up on that. Either junk, or they want new price.

The two mentioned in the subject line.....these look like they are the same, but price isn't. Does anyone know if in fact they are the same? Haven't seen the Rhinso S300 first hand, just pictures.
 

dun

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Didn;t know you could get a PHD at TSC, thought you had to go to college
 
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jcummins

jcummins

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dun":2jks91q3 said:
Didn;t know you could get a PHD at TSC, thought you had to go to college

Nah…you don’t need college for that! They got different models to….you just buy it. No sitting in boring classes listening to air heads talk. Pretty good deal you ask me.
 

marksmu

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My phd is a rhino one - its had no issues and I have used it on about 600 posts. Honestly though - breaking a phd is pretty tough to do unless your trying to do it. Trinity is not that far from where I am - and after IKE we had to replaces over 7 miles of fence around our place - and I will make a suggestion which is highly dependent on the size of your tractor and your soil - but if possible and your tractor is large enough, use your Front end loader to push the posts in. You may need to fill your bucket with a load of dirt and hammer a few times on the posts to get it started, but usually once its broken the first few inches of hard crust it will just push right in.

I use a Kubota M9000 with a heavy duty ANBO root rake/grapple (1600lbs) to do my hammering and pushing, and it will make putting a 5-7 inch round wood post in the ground a 40 second ordeal as opposed to a 5 minute ordeal. When the post is in its packed, and you dont need to use a shovel to back fill either. When you are installing thousands of posts though - going from 5-10 minutes down to 30-40 seconds is an amazing difference. The ground for us is still soft so driving them in isnt a problem, but if you are already dryed out, you can just wait till you get some rain, and then do it. We are just driving our wood posts now while the soil is still soft enough - and stretching only the bottom wire - we come back later once the fields are good and dry, and put the Tposts, and the other 3 strands in.

Its so much faster and better for me, that I to this day cannot even imagine going back and drilling all my holes. I work with just me and a friend, we went from drilling the holes, and being able to complete about 400-500 feet in a day, to completing right at about 1500 feet. Thats if we stretch all 4 wires, and put in the tposts and the clips.

If we just do the wood posts and the bottom strand like we are doing now, we go about 4000 feet in a day, thats with a wood 5-7 round every 50 feet, and an H brace every 300 feet, or more frequently if were turning alot.

Just a thought - we fenced for a year with a PHD before someone told me to just drive them when the soil is wet. I think I owe that guy a nice dinner.
 
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jcummins

jcummins

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Believe me, I’d much prefer to pound the post in. I had use of a King Hitter series III post pounder for awhile. It needed some repair, and fabrication of some parts before it was useable. In exchange for that, and due to the person situation who owned it, I had use of it for awhile. So…..I’m well aware of the advantages of pounding the post in versus digging a hole. I hated it, when I finally had to give it up.

One of the ‘parts’ we did not fab up was a cap that slide on the mast to hold the post next to the mast. We made one for pipe, but not for wood post. Due to the lack of that, I found, it was really easy to get the post going in crooked. I learned you used small ‘taps’ and checked the post with a level, and repeated until it got a good start in the ground, then I could pound hard. If you didn’t correct it in the very initial stage of pounding….on each stroke…you would not have a straight post. How do you go about keeping that post straight?

Pounding in pipe, not an issue at all, regardless of soil condition. Now I was pounding in 7-9 inch post, small telephone pole types…and even a couple of railroad ties. And the ground literally shook when I pounded those in. Wet soil or not, based upon this pounder use, I would of thought that would be tough to do the way you describe. But your experience is telling me …it works, so I need to give that a try. Guess I’m missing how much the wet soil changes it. I got black gumbo in some areas, so dunno...but I'll try none the less. I know with tpost right after a rain, once I literally pushed some in by hand. Let me know how you kept the post straight, or if you found it an issue. . BTW have a M7040, think it would be up to the task? Also I’m very envious of your ANBO. I could really put that to use.
 

marksmu

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I have the same soil you mention - once you break the crust there is no bottom to how far you can go in the goo - To keep our post straight - my friend holds it for the first few hits. He crouches low, and I line up on a large square tubing in the rake.... once I get it in about 8" he stands up with a level straightens it up, and then holds for a couple more taps, once Im about 18" in he moves away and I sit on it, and just push in the remaining dist. I leave 5'6" up of the 8' post which I premark on all of em with spray paint.

If you are having a hard time getting them in initially, you can sharpen the point with your chainsaw, and push through just about anything. If I sharpen the posts I can sit on em with a 30hp tractor with sand in the bucket.

I was looking at buying a shaver post driver when my neighbor told me about this method.
 

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