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Rotational Grazing

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Anonymous

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To me rotational grazing seems like a good idea, because you can put more cows on an area of land. But, my question is how does it work. I don't understand how you can have a 2 acre. paddock and let 50 cows graze on it for a day or two. If anyone who sees this message uses rotational grazing, would you please get back with me, I would be interested in talking with you.

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A

Anonymous

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The point in MIG (Management Intensive Grazing) is to put enough cows on a given area that they consume all the available forage and don't cherry pick only the good stuff. You rotate them off and allow the paddock to rest for a number of days, depending on the forage type, typically 21 to 30 days. These periods need to be increased as the forage growth slows. Grasses have a recommended height to start grazing and a minimum height to graze to. If you do a search using managment intensoive grazing you will get a bunch of hits that will explain it more thouroghly

dunmovin farms

> To me rotational grazing seems
> like a good idea, because you can
> put more cows on an area of land.
> But, my question is how does it
> work. I don't understand how you
> can have a 2 acre. paddock and let
> 50 cows graze on it for a day or
> two. If anyone who sees this
> message uses rotational grazing,
> would you please get back with me,
> I would be interested in talking
> with you.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
As normal, Dun is precise & right on. I usually try to give my herd enough area to last them 2-4 days. If it is a field with more weeds or a field I know they don't like as well, I give them a smaller area so they eat it quick & clean it up better - weeds & all. One thing about MIG - NEVER - NEVER let them eat (or walk over) pasture longer than 7 days - because they will start eating regrowth. First thing in the spring, I will start grazing early - each large paddock will only last a day (at best). But you can go back to the same fields 7 days later when they are in such tremendous growth without hurting them. Also, I used to worry about them "punching up" the fields too much early spring (my pastures can be swampy!!) so I used to start out with my poorest fields. They are now about my best fields. Did them a world of good! Go figure! Jeanne <A HREF="http://www.SimmeValley.com" TARGET="_blank">http://www.SimmeValley.com</A>

> The point in MIG (Management
> Intensive Grazing) is to put
> enough cows on a given area that
> they consume all the available
> forage and don't cherry pick only
> the good stuff. You rotate them
> off and allow the paddock to rest
> for a number of days, depending on
> the forage type, typically 21 to
> 30 days. These periods need to be
> increased as the forage growth
> slows. Grasses have a recommended
> height to start grazing and a
> minimum height to graze to. If you
> do a search using managment
> intensoive grazing you will get a
> bunch of hits that will explain it
> more thouroghly

> dunmovin farms

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OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
In order to calculate how many animal units ("AU", 1 AU = 1,000 lbs.)can graze in an MIG system, you first need to determine how many days it takes for grass to grow in your area. Where we live in SouthWest Florida, it takes 21 days on average for grass to grow. Consequently, I will need 22 paddocks to give the grass in each paddock 21 days of rest and growth. Each paddock is 2 acres x 1 acre. Thus, the total area that I am sub-dividing into paddocks is 44 acres. Lastly, if I can run 1 AU to an acre and I have 44 acres, then I will place 44 AUs into my paddock system and rotate them into a new paddock each day. I hope this helps.

MIG grazing info from Ohio State (scroll to the bottom of the web page): <A HREF="http://ohioline.osu.edu/gsg/" TARGET="_blank">http://ohioline.osu.edu/gsg/</A>

John Wilderness Ranch Myakka City, Fl.
 

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