Registered Angus or shorthorns

Help Support CattleToday:

justlearning

Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2006
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
I'm on 80 acres in central Minnesota. I've raised a few calves previously but more for my freezer than anything else. I want to start a small herd of beef cows. I'm thinking my farm can handle 15-20 cows. I have the opportunity to buy three shorthorn heifers weighing about 500 lb. each, or 2 registered black Angus bred cows out of a good herd. The shorthorns will cost a buck and a quarter a pound and the Angus cows about $1,200 ea. Question being is there enough value added in the registered animals come market time to make the larger investment worth while?
 

auctionboy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2006
Messages
774
Reaction score
0
Location
NY
This all depends on what kind of salesmen you are and how much effort you want to put into conviencing people how great your cows are with numbers and names. I wouldn't go registered, but with your 80 acres you would have a chance to max your profits with registered without getting more land.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
11
Location
MO Ozarks
You also have to look at the cost of raising those 500 lb heifers to the point of their calving vs the quicker return on you investment of buying bred cows.

dun
 

toby

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
133
Reaction score
0
Location
Central TX
If you can afford both the Shorthorns and the Angus this would be a start to those 18 head with good dervisity. Either a red angus or shorthorn bull should produce some real good caves.
 

Frankie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
6,915
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma
justlearning":ffn5nx4m said:
I'm on 80 acres in central Minnesota. I've raised a few calves previously but more for my freezer than anything else. I want to start a small herd of beef cows. I'm thinking my farm can handle 15-20 cows. I have the opportunity to buy three shorthorn heifers weighing about 500 lb. each, or 2 registered black Angus bred cows out of a good herd. The shorthorns will cost a buck and a quarter a pound and the Angus cows about $1,200 ea. Question being is there enough value added in the registered animals come market time to make the larger investment worth while?

That depends on where you will market them. Look around and see if there's a market for the registered animals; if not go with the commercial. I know we've made more money with our small registered herd than we would have made with commercial cattle, but it is more work. Good luck...
 

CowpokeJ

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 30, 2006
Messages
455
Reaction score
0
Location
North of Houston
justlearning":329nxr60 said:
I'm on 80 acres in central Minnesota. I've raised a few calves previously but more for my freezer than anything else. I want to start a small herd of beef cows. I'm thinking my farm can handle 15-20 cows. I have the opportunity to buy three shorthorn heifers weighing about 500 lb. each, or 2 registered black Angus bred cows out of a good herd. The shorthorns will cost a buck and a quarter a pound and the Angus cows about $1,200 ea. Question being is there enough value added in the registered animals come market time to make the larger investment worth while?
How old & how much bred?
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
11
Location
MO Ozarks
Just because they're registered doesn't mean you can't breed them as commercial. The last time I proced bred commercial cows around here they're were running 1200-1500, but that was 3-4 months ago.
 

ENNOT

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
324
Reaction score
0
Location
WA
I agree with Dun totally. In my mind, the two bred cows are a better investment because you have a faster rate of return. Registered or not, they still need to raise a calf. I have a few registered cows but they are held to the same standards as the commercial cows.
 

boone

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 9, 2006
Messages
233
Reaction score
0
Location
MISSOURI
You have to consider how you would get the heifers bred, and being new to the cow/calf business, odds are the two cows will give you a better chance of a trouble free first go round. Boone
 
OP
J

justlearning

Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2006
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
Thanks to all who responded to my question. I learned that I have a few more questions to ask about the cattle I'm considering. I also learned that there is no clear cut answer. I really do appreciate all the responses. I tend to over analyse things sometimes but I want to do the right thing from the start.
 

Latest posts

Top