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Rapid weight loss and lethargy

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lometalass

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:?: I've got a 18-24 month old heifer (approx. 500lbs) that looked healthy 2 weeks ago, now she's drawn down (extremely fast), NO energy, sunken eyes, and some drooling/salivating. I haven't notice any other "outward" syptoms, and she she appeared to be in perfect health at the last pen up. I've got her seperated from the herd, and gave her 22Ml of Duramycin 72-200 - didn't know what else to do. Any suggestions, ideas, or thoughts would be appreciated. I'm on my own in the family cattle business now, for the first time, and would sure appreciate some advise from you "old-timers" or ranchers in-the-know!!!
 

Texan

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lometalass":8ndmizmr said:
:?: I've got a 18-24 month old heifer (approx. 500lbs).......
Sounds to me like she's probably starving to death.....
 

Running Arrow Bill

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Not enough detail for wild guess answer...lol. On the other hand,

a standard sized breed cow/bull should gain about 2 lbs per day from birth up until about 12-18 months of age, then gain tapers off. An "adult" bovine should probably weigh close to 1,000 lbs by 18 months of age. Healthy, standard size breed calves should weigh about 400 to 500 lbs at about 8 or 9 months of age.

Sounds like you either have a "minature" bred (such as Dexter); or, your animal is seriously underweight for the age. Is she de-wormed regularly (twice a year or so)? Etc., etc.?

Example: Standard weaning age is 205 days. If a calf weighed 75 lbs at birth, then at 2# daily gain average, at 205 days it should weigh about 485 lbs. At 12 months old (365 day), it should weigh about 805# based on 2# daily gain from 75# birthweight.

Hope this helps some! :)
 

Kelly

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She could be dehydrated. Is she drinking plenty of water? Have you watched how much she is actually eating?
 

OldTex

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lometalass":10qgaj24 said:
:?: I've got a 18-24 month old heifer (approx. 500lbs) that looked healthy 2 weeks ago, now she's drawn down (extremely fast), NO energy, sunken eyes, and some drooling/salivating. I haven't notice any other "outward" syptoms, and she she appeared to be in perfect health at the last pen up. I've got her seperated from the herd, and gave her 22Ml of Duramycin 72-200 - didn't know what else to do. Any suggestions, ideas, or thoughts would be appreciated. I'm on my own in the family cattle business now, for the first time, and would sure appreciate some advise from you "old-timers" or ranchers in-the-know!!!

Possible, Anaplasmosis. Same symptoms.
 

cattle_gal

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What breed is she? Was she a roping heifer? How long have you had her? What feed does she get and water source? If you bought her what condition was she in when you bought her?

Another suggestion is she could have an infection inside her. You may not be able to tell just looking at her. When you look at her back end can you see white coming out of her vagina? any discoloring? Like Kelly said she could be dehydrated. She probably can't eat. I've had a couple of cows that had infections that didn't drink or eat and I had to be the nurse maid. You can bring a tub of water or you may have to tube her. Mixing in lots of electrolytes(powder formulated). Some infections work best if you give penicillin and some with the "mycin" family.

Best is to call your vet to get to the bottom of her problem. Internet help can only go so far, but in person help is much more through.
 

txshowmom

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I've got a 18-24 month old heifer (approx. 500lbs) that looked healthy 2 weeks ago, now she's drawn down (extremely fast), NO energy, sunken eyes, and some drooling/salivating. I haven't notice any other "outward" syptoms, and she she appeared to be in perfect health at the last pen up.

I wouldn't be worries about whats wrong with her I would be more worried about why I kept a calf that only weighed 500 lbs at 18-24 months. She needs to hit the road and I would NOT recommend eating her.
 

Scotty

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I think if you are dead set on keeping this animal around for some reson I would get her in a chute and put fluids in her. If she is able to walk I have to agree with momma and she needs to go. I hope you don't takte this badly.
 

Texan

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lometalass":291f7ii0 said:
I'm on my own in the family cattle business now, for the first time, and would sure appreciate some advise from you "old-timers" or ranchers in-the-know!!!
Hey, lometalass.......I was so quick to jump on your first post with the smartass comment about the size/age of your heifer, that I forgot something a lot more important:

Welcome to the Boards!!!

You came to the right place for help and advice, in spite of the first impression that I'm sure I gave you. My sincere apologies. Most of the people here are really great cowfolks and will go out of there way to make you feel comfortable and help you. And then, there's the rest of us...... ;-)

Good luck!
 

ollie

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Sounds familiar. Don't stick your hand in her mouth. See the thread titled pack stomach in this health and nutrition board. She could have rabies. Probably not though.
 

calpat

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Sounds like her rumen isn't functioning to me. Nursed a good longhorn heifer through pneumonia once & that happened afterward..I saved her & she turned into a good cow. Probios & dry hay & good water..a little alfalfa maybe.
 

Oblak

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Sounds like what i am suffering with now, the vets have tested both cows with pestivirus, I am from Australia, my first cow had to be destroyed, the symtoms are so much like yours, drooling badly, loosing weight dramaticlly even thought getting grain etc. It appears my cow is persistantly resistant to pestivirus which means she has mucosol disease a disease they get during Utro (sp?)
 

Beefy

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what is your heifer eating and when was the last time she was dewormed?
 

Caustic Burno

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lometalass":2vk64nq6 said:
:?: I've got a 18-24 month old heifer (approx. 500lbs) that looked healthy 2 weeks ago, now she's drawn down (extremely fast), NO energy, sunken eyes, and some drooling/salivating. I haven't notice any other "outward" syptoms, and she she appeared to be in perfect health at the last pen up. I've got her seperated from the herd, and gave her 22Ml of Duramycin 72-200 - didn't know what else to do. Any suggestions, ideas, or thoughts would be appreciated. I'm on my own in the family cattle business now, for the first time, and would sure appreciate some advise from you "old-timers" or ranchers in-the-know!!!

The drooling is what bothers me.

Rabies in Texas
< Back to Rabies Laboratory |

Rabies continues to be epizootic in Texas. In Texas, as well as the rest of the US, rabies is primarily a disease of wild animals including skunks, foxes, bats, and raccoons. There are three strains of rabies prevalent in terrestrial animals in Texas, the Texas fox strain (TF), the domestic dog/coyote strain (DDC), and the south central skunk strain (SCS). These strains are maintained by intraspecies transmission within the host species with occasional spillover to both domestic and other wild animals. The raccoon rabies strain that is prevalent on the east coast of the United States is not currently found in Texas, but raccoons do get infected as a result of spillover from the skunk, fox, and coyote epizootics. Distinct rabies virus variants are found in insectivorous bats in multiple independent reservoirs of bat species.


The DDC strain of rabies appeared along the Texas-Mexico border in 1989, and quickly became established in both coyotes and dogs in the area. This canine epizootic spread throughout south Texas by the end of 1994. Fox rabies (TF) was nonexistent prior to 1945 in Texas. It first appeared in the eastern part of Texas in 1946 and moved toward west Texas. The epizootic died out in the eastern part of the state and became enzootic in southwest Texas during 1970-80 period. In 1987-88, the epizootic reoccurred and began expanding north and east. By the end of 1994, fox rabies had spread throughout west central Texas. In 1994-95, the Oral Rabies Vaccination Program (ORVP), which had shown success in Canada and Europe against fox rabies, was initiated to combat the canine rabies epizootic in south Texas and fox rabies epizootic in west central Texas.

Facts:

Animal rabies is endemic in Texas.
The majority of the animals tested for rabies in Texas are dogs and cats which are submitted for rabies testing because of their aggressive behavior and / or exposure to humans or pets.
Wild animals such as bats, skunks, foxes, and coyotes are still the primary reservoirs of rabies.
The ORVP has resulted in a decrease in rabies positive coyotes in south Texas and rabies positive foxes in west central Texas.
Educating the public to avoid contact with wild animals, especially dead and downed bats, will prevent human or pet exposure.





Last Updated December 1, 2004
 

SPRINGER FARMS MURRAY GRE

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lometalass":3gxw77wr said:
:?: I've got a 18-24 month old heifer (approx. 500lbs) that looked healthy 2 weeks ago, now she's drawn down (extremely fast), NO energy, sunken eyes, and some drooling/salivating. I haven't notice any other "outward" syptoms, and she she appeared to be in perfect health at the last pen up. I've got her seperated from the herd, and gave her 22Ml of Duramycin 72-200 - didn't know what else to do. Any suggestions, ideas, or thoughts would be appreciated. I'm on my own in the family cattle business now, for the first time, and would sure appreciate some advise from you "old-timers" or ranchers in-the-know!!!

I am thinking hardware disease....or possibly organophosphate poisoning.Any spray contaminated feed or hay? Definitely sounds liek dehydration from whatever the cause...need to chute her,and maybe iv fliuds or tube. If you tube,be careful! ;-) :(
 

Chuckie

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Speaking of rabies.....My brother had a skunk family move under his house. When dog killed the mother, the babies started coming out from under the house. They said they looked like house shoes and picked them up. The skunks were very gentle and licked their hands. They called the Wildlife people and they came to move the skunks elsewhere. The wildlife man told them to never pick up a wild animal because of rabies. They told him that the skunks didn't bite. He told them that rabies was a virus and that it is spread just like the flu, all you have to do is come into close contact with the animal and you can catch it. I always thought you had to be bit.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Chuckie":2mrt414t said:
Speaking of rabies.....My brother had a skunk family move under his house. When dog killed the mother, the babies started coming out from under the house. They said they looked like house shoes and picked them up. The skunks were very gentle and licked their hands. They called the Wildlife people and they came to move the skunks elsewhere. The wildlife man told them to never pick up a wild animal because of rabies. They told him that the skunks didn't bite. He told them that rabies was a virus and that it is spread just like the flu, all you have to do is come into close contact with the animal and you can catch it. I always thought you had to be bit.
You do NOT have to be bitten. The disease is spread from their saliva. So it you touch the animal and it has saliva on its hair, you can pick up the rabies - but it also has to enter your body thru an open wound - or (I think) through your mouth & eyes. If you ever find a dead wild animal and have to move it - you should slip some AI goves on - or other disposable gloves - never touch it.
One day I was on my way to the barn & spotted a raccoon sitting next to a tree between the house & the barn - kind of weaving around. Luckily my dogs had not seen it. I put them away & got my 20 ga. and killed it. When I went into the barn to get gloves & a feed sack, I found 4 dead kittens. If I had not seen the coon first, I probably would have picked up the kittens to see what had happened to them. I deffinately would have had to have the series of shots - according to the animal control people. By killing the kittens, it got saliva on them so they could spread the disease.
 
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