Neighbor Problems

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Anonymous

What, if anything, can you do when it appears your neighbor is trying to poison your cattle?

We don't get along with a neighbor on the other side of our fence. They have been piling up green rhubarb leaves along our fence so that the cattle can poke their heads thru the barbed wire and eat them. We didn't know what they were doing at first. Why weren't they feeding them to their own cattle or horses if it was good for animals? Then, after we had a calf die, we started searching online and found out how poisonous green rhubarb is - for both animals and humans!

We can't prove the calf died of poisoning because we hauled the carcass away before realizing what he had been eating. But, the neighbor continues to pile the green leaves up to our fence. Since they have continued the practice, is there anything we can do to prove they are purposely attempting to poison our cattle?
 

I luv herfrds

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I would contact your local enforcement and ask what your options are concerning this. I would also try asking them face to face to not put the rhubarb leaves so near to where your cattle can reach them. Explain that the leaves are toxic and if you have an animal die due to eating the leaves that they could be liable.
If you can't stand talking to them then send it in a certified letter to them.
Document document document, Take pictures and mark dates when they are doing this and if you lose another animal have it posted immediately.

Good luck and welcome to the board. :tiphat:
 

Bez+

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There are two possible issues - you are not a responsible owner and they resent this "head through the fence" - or they are dick heads and you have schittie fences.

What they are doing is not illegal - so fence your property so the animals cannot stick their head through the fence. If they go through the fence they are feeding off the neighbours land - even if standing on your property - some people resent this.

Then patrol the fence on a regular basis - use 24D to solve issues - it leaves the grass behind and the neighbours will never know if you are careful and smart.

There is of course the option to make nice with the neighbours - despite past troubles there are some folks who actually have had success in this - remember - it ALWAYS takes two to tango - perhaps they are saying the same thing about you.

Or (sarcaasm) you can wait for them to go to town and burn them out.

Remember - it is their land - you or your cows are the interlopers.

Regards

Bez+
 
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Anonymous

Thank you for your replies....I think. :)

Our animals are well fed and don't eat the grasses through the fence. The fence in question is actually his. We have almost all new fencing on the perimeter of our property....having new posts, "hog wire", and 2 strands of barb wire to keep the cattle's faces in....except for his fence line....which is 3 strands of barb wire. We don't pet or feed our animals through the fences to avoid problems of them pushing through.

We mend his fence to make sure it stays up but he doesn't really like us touching it. His horses and cattle are pushing through his fence to eat the grasses growing on our property.

I find it a bit extreme to poison a neighbor's animal. We have put a panel up along the fence to keep the newest calves from being curious and getting poisoned.

I just thought that, since it is illegal to poison a stray dog, there might be something we could do to protect our animals other than replace his entire fence for him.
 

Jogeephus

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mtblujeans":1nosffoq said:
I just thought that, since it is illegal to poison a stray dog, there might be something we could do to protect our animals other than replace his entire fence for him.

I think you would have to prove malicious intent. I'm in agreement that you should ask them not to put the tops near the fence and explain why. If they continue to do this I'd send them a certified letter repeating this. If they continue to do this, then you might have enough evidence to prove malicious intent to poison. More simply, I think running a hot wire about three foot off the fence would solve lots of problems.
 

grannysoo

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Jogeephus":u7a9za63 said:
More simply, I think running a hot wire about three foot off the fence would solve lots of problems.

Right on track. Build your own fence to keep them off your neighbors fence. You already said that he didn't want you touching his fence, so leave it be, and take care of yours.
 

Angus Cowman

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The fence in question is actually his. We have almost all new fencing on the perimeter of our property...

If the fence is on the property line it is a joint fence owned and maintained by both owners (at least in our state) if it is on his property only he can claim it and your animals are trespassing
I would check thefence laws in your state and talk to the authorities
 

1982vett

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A single strand of electric wire at 30 inches on step-in post a foot inside the existing fence will solve the problem and your cattle will be able to graze to the existing fence. Problem solved
 

talldog

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1982vett":b18kvz51 said:
A single strand of electric wire at 30 inches on step-in post a foot inside the existing fence will solve the problem and your cattle will be able to graze to the existing fence. Problem solved
Case Closed !!! :)
 

cfpinz

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alacattleman":38ex03v1 said:
if all else fails, catch him out somewhere and stomp the pi$$ out of him... we always had good luck with that :p

I think we'd get along pretty good...
 
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Anonymous

Thank you for the replies. I should clarify: The area in question is gravel....nothing growing there to eat. By putting the leaves just on the other side of the fence, they were enticing the cattle to come to the fence and stick their heads through. We rotate cow/calf pairs into and out of that pasture.

You have given some good suggestions. Thank you again.
 

farmwriter

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We have ongoing problems with the out of state deer hunters who plant their greenfields right at our property lines and have their shooting houses facing our property where we sometimes run cattle. My mother swears this year she's pouring corn on our side of the fence and calling the game warden. I understand the fine in Alabama for hunting over bait is pretty steep.
 

I luv herfrds

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From what I know on the fence laws here in Montana, if you build and maintain that fence, you own it. If someone damages your fence then they have to either repair it or replace it.
Go a head and run a hot wire to keep your cattle back if that is possible and if those rhubarb leaves magically appear closer contact law enforcement.

I think your neighbor is doing it to be an azz, personally speaking.
Like I said tell him, certify mail and document like crazy. Shoot a little video too, it looks good in front of a judge. ;-)


I like your Mom farmwriter. :D Smart woman.
 

showing71

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I luv herfrds":2lrtj29n said:
From what I know on the fence laws here in Montana, if you build and maintain that fence, you own it. If someone damages your fence then they have to either repair it or replace it.
Go a head and run a hot wire to keep your cattle back if that is possible and if those rhubarb leaves magically appear closer contact law enforcement.

I think your neighbor is doing it to be an azz, personally speaking.
Like I said tell him, certify mail and document like crazy. Shoot a little video too, it looks good in front of a judge. ;-)


I like your Mom farmwriter. :D Smart woman.
I agree herfrds, take a picture of the fence before putting the hotwire up, take a picture after putting the hotwire up, take a picture of the rhubarb on their side of the fence, and if it gets closer, take another picture. We've had years of problems with neighbors, which ended up with a lawsuit. The pictures saved us a lot of hassel and from the potential of losing land.
 

backhoeboogie

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Three strands of barbed wire is not much of a fence.

A game cam in a tree overlooking that proximity would provide plenty of proof.

We almost had a Sutton/Taylor fued here a couple of years back. It seemed I would either wind up 6 feet under, or in prison.

I have 9 awesome neighbors, two marginal and 1 that will eventually die of old age hopefully.
 

kerley

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I have had similar problems at my place. I dont like trouble with anyone, I have changed since Ive grown older. Just build another new fence on your side of the property line and tell your neighbor to kiss your .....
Tom.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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A joint fence is a problem, conflict, or ??? waiting to happen! [Same holds for most "business partnerships"...lol.

OUR solution and would be a "good" solution for you...

All of our fences adjoining another ranchers are DOUBLE FENCES. We have installed a second fence (2 to 3 feet inside) on our own property for a "nose, sniffing, butting" barrier. A "3 wire" fence to keep cattle (and calves) in is ludicrous! Go 5 barb wire or more. Another "safety" factor is put your second fence far enough inside your property to create an alleyway (moving cattle, vehicles, etc.).

Electric fences (for divider fences inside your property) are OK).

As a rancher, your legal and moral obligation is to keep YOUR cattle on your property, and THEIR cattle OFF your property.

"Good Fences Make Good Neighbors"...even if your have to pay for a separate fence yourself...
 
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