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USAxBrad

USAxBrad

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Yeah read that on the label.....I turned him out a week earlier son he should still get 56 days with them once it kicks in. He will be out there for 77 days.
 

Big creek 24

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My vet assistant tells me that using multimin will decrease the amount of free choice mineral usage by at least a third. Does anyone know if that is right? If it does the cost of a shot would be cheap with the price of wind and rain.
 

Dave

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I know that my neighbor B gives a multi min to every new born calf. He calves out a lot of cows and I doubt that he would be doing it if it didn't have a positive result. The calf dose only cost about $0.50.
Last year I gave it to purchased heifers. Probably cheap insurance to unknown cattle. But cow that have had minerals available to them it is probably a waste of time and money.
 

Son of Butch

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My vet assistant tells me that using multimin will decrease the amount of free choice mineral usage by at least a third. Does anyone know if that is right? If it does the cost of a shot would be cheap with the price of wind and rain.
Multimin has been around a long time and I have never heard that claim.
IF it were true, the savings would be so big, everyone would be using it
no questions asked.

My guess is your Vet Assistant has a future in sales or marketing, but not
as a veterinarian.
 

TexasBred

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My vet assistant tells me that using multimin will decrease the amount of free choice mineral usage by at least a third. Does anyone know if that is right? If it does the cost of a shot would be cheap with the price of wind and rain.
think he sort of pulled that out of thin air and he probably sells Miltimin, not mineral.
 

Brute 23

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I've been using it here and there if a cow is poor or on bulls. Gave it to some replacement heifers when I weaned them this year.

I'm not planning on giving it to every cow that goes thru the chute. Our vet said it was not necessary after seeing blood tests on the cows.

If I'm already investing in a bull, replacement heifer, sick cow, dont think the multimin is going to make or break the deal. It was highly recommended in the AI class and I would definitely being doing it in that scenario.
 

cjmc

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Quality free choice mineral has a place on pretty much anyone's place. Multmin has a place- but just on pretty much no one's place.

That's a big over simplicition. But on the majority of ranches I've see use it with success weren't using a high quality mineral at the time & would likely have gotten the same response if they upgraded their mineral program. Some places definitely could use it though. Colorado comes to mind where they graze the mountain ranges in the summer & can't get mineral to cattle for months at a time. A shot prior to turn out would load up liver storage of TM's.

If you can feed cattle mineral all year & don't live in a place with high levels of mineral antagonists it probably won't improve prefomance. If it does you should re-evaluate your free choice mineral program.
 

JKCattle

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Quality free choice mineral has a place on pretty much anyone's place. Multmin has a place- but just on pretty much no one's place.

That's a big over simplicition. But on the majority of ranches I've see use it with success weren't using a high quality mineral at the time & would likely have gotten the same response if they upgraded their mineral program. Some places definitely could use it though. Colorado comes to mind where they graze the mountain ranges in the summer & can't get mineral to cattle for months at a time. A shot prior to turn out would load up liver storage of TM's.

If you can feed cattle mineral all year & don't live in a place with high levels of mineral antagonists it probably won't improve prefomance. If it does you should re-evaluate your free choice mineral program.
I agree. I do use Vitamin E / Selenium injections for newborn calves. I also am not a fan of wind & rain mineral. Done too many mineral analysis of liver biopsies where Se, Zn and Cu were deficient. Many of the red mineral mixes are made from cheaper ingredients that poorly absorbed- you get what you pay for
 

Big creek 24

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I agree. I do use Vitamin E / Selenium injections for newborn calves. I also am not a fan of wind & rain mineral. Done too many mineral analysis of liver biopsies where Se, Zn and Cu were deficient. Many of the red mineral mixes are made from cheaper ingredients that poorly absorbed- you get what you pay for
I’m curious as to what the issues are with the wind and rain minerals and what you would recommend in its place?
 

JKCattle

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I’m curious as to what the issues are with the wind and rain minerals and what you would recommend in its place?
Really don’t know. I’ve heard the theory that the material it is encapsulated in to make it rain resistant also decreases absorption as well as it being a red mineral which in general has lower absorption. Just my dumb Aggie thoughts
 

Nkline

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I agree. I do use Vitamin E / Selenium injections for newborn calves. I also am not a fan of wind & rain mineral. Done too many mineral analysis of liver biopsies where Se, Zn and Cu were deficient. Many of the red mineral mixes are made from cheaper ingredients that poorly absorbed- you get what you pay for
The reason the red minerals are red is because they’re adding iron oxide (rust) for coloring. A lot of mineral deficiencies will very by location. Selinium will also very by breed as continental breeds typically need more. Honestly, you really don’t get what you pay for. All of it has a crazy mark up if you start doing the math.
 

Brute 23

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I stand corrected. And now that I think about it I've heard of cattle chewing on bones for the phos.
Horns. I've have gotten really in to shed hunting and you have to be quick to find them before the animals. Cows love to chew on the deer horns. I have quite a few that you can tell are definitely chewed up.
 

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