Help with registering Angus

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ksmit454

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I purchased 2 heifers from a local that has registered stock, but does not take the time to register the calves. He knows the bulls information (as he owns the bull), but is not sure who the sires are to the 2 heifers I bought. He said I can take a blood sample and send it into Angus Association. Anyone have any information that would help me with this? I will most likely end up calling Angus Assoc to ask for their help too, so I can get these heifers registered.
 

gizmom

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I purchased 2 heifers from a local that has registered stock, but does not take the time to register the calves. He knows the bulls information (as he owns the bull), but is not sure who the sires are to the 2 heifers I bought. He said I can take a blood sample and send it into Angus Association. Anyone have any information that would help me with this? I will most likely end up calling Angus Assoc to ask for their help too, so I can get these heifers registered.
They will also need blood samples on the sires in order to match the heifer to the sire.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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They will also need blood samples on the sires in order to match the heifer to the sire.
Well shoot... I was under the impression that I could send in a sample from the heifers and they could match it to the registered sire that is registered with the Angus Assoc.
 

Katpau

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Are both the sire and dam of the calves registered with American Angus? If not, this is probably going to get more complicated than it is worth. If both are registered animals, and the bulls in question were purchased from a reputable seedstock breeder, then there is a good chance they already have DNA on file with AAA. Get their registration numbers and look them up. I can help you do that, if you have trouble. If that is the case, it will not be difficult to identify the sire once you have a blood or tissue sample from your heifers. You will still need their breeder to transfer them into your name.

If the bulls are registered and don't have DNA on file you will need to get a blood or tissue sample from any bulls in question, and pay for the DNA analysis on them and on your heifers. Parentage tests are $18 and registration is $12 for members for calves under 4 months and that price increases as they get older, topping out at $32 for a calf over 12 months.. Membership is $80 per year. The breeder of the calves will also need to complete a transfer to you and there will be a fee for that. There is quite a bit of information on the home page of American Angus under member services. I believe you can register without being a member at a higher fee, but I don't know what that is.

Normally the animals breeder will do all of this for you and will pay all fees. I'm assuming you purchased them as commercial calves and the breeder made no guarantees of registration. I have a hunch you could buy a registered heifer calf from me with all data out of parents with DNA enhanced EPDs for less or about the same money. I kind of wonder if all the effort and money it will take to get them registered is worth it for calves from a breeder who probably isn't even turning in data to the registry.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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Are both the sire and dam of the calves registered with American Angus? If not, this is probably going to get more complicated than it is worth. If both are registered animals, and the bulls in question were purchased from a reputable seedstock breeder, then there is a good chance they already have DNA on file with AAA. Get their registration numbers and look them up. I can help you do that, if you have trouble. If that is the case, it will not be difficult to identify the sire once you have a blood or tissue sample from your heifers. You will still need their breeder to transfer them into your name.

If the bulls are registered and don't have DNA on file you will need to get a blood or tissue sample from any bulls in question, and pay for the DNA analysis on them and on your heifers. Parentage tests are $18 and registration is $12 for members for calves under 4 months and that price increases as they get older, topping out at $32 for a calf over 12 months.. Membership is $80 per year. The breeder of the calves will also need to complete a transfer to you and there will be a fee for that. There is quite a bit of information on the home page of American Angus under member services. I believe you can register without being a member at a higher fee, but I don't know what that is.

Normally the animals breeder will do all of this for you and will pay all fees. I'm assuming you purchased them as commercial calves and the breeder made no guarantees of registration. I have a hunch you could buy a registered heifer calf from me with all data out of parents with DNA enhanced EPDs for less or about the same money. I kind of wonder if all the effort and money it will take to get them registered is worth it for calves from a breeder who probably isn't even turning in data to the registry.
Thank you for all that great info! I did call Angus Assoc and I gave her the information on the 3 possible cows (that are registered). She said that 2 of the 3 have DNA on file so it would be process of elimination on what heifer belongs to what cow. The gentleman I got them from has registered stock (cows and bulls) but takes no bother in registering any of the offspring. Now I’m second guessing as to if I should even register these heifers. I honestly just wanted to fulfill my goal of having a few good registered heifers.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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Which begs the question...knowing the breeder doesn't register the calves why would you pursue attempting to register the heifers?
Honestly, I’ve had cattle for almost 2 years now and so far, I’ve only raised and finished out feeder steers, and have a few Herefords and now these angus. I’ve always wanted some really good registered Angus stock. It’s just always been a dream of mine. But I understand your point, much more logical than mine, lol.
 

gizmom

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Honestly, I’ve had cattle for almost 2 years now and so far, I’ve only raised and finished out feeder steers, and have a few Herefords and now these angus. I’ve always wanted some really good registered Angus stock. It’s just always been a dream of mine. But I understand your point, much more logical than mine, lol.
Sometimes the paperwork just gets to be more than a breeder wants to deal with, at one time they probably turned everything in then over the years got behind. It happens, sometimes I am ready to throw my hands up and just have a really good commercial herd. The older I get the more that thought goes through my head lol. i am not there yet but can sure see how it can happen.
 

CowsRcuddly

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If your breeder gets almost the same price for his "unregistered" cattle, I can see how he stops doing all the work of registering them. I wonder though how he doesn't even know the dams of these 2 calves? He must not do any recording of information of his herd. A friend sells his heifers and bulls at one price, then adds $150 if you want them registered. He figures that is what it would cost to do all of the paper work. I find it easier to keep up with all of the paper work of identifying sire and dam, birth weight, weaning weight, ultrasound, DNA, ect. Good Luck with getting them registered. Keep us updated, as we can walk you through any pitfalls.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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If your breeder gets almost the same price for his "unregistered" cattle, I can see how he stops doing all the work of registering them. I wonder though how he doesn't even know the dams of these 2 calves? He must not do any recording of information of his herd. A friend sells his heifers and bulls at one price, then adds $150 if you want them registered. He figures that is what it would cost to do all of the paper work. I find it easier to keep up with all of the paper work of identifying sire and dam, birth weight, weaning weight, ultrasound, DNA, ect. Good Luck with getting them registered. Keep us updated, as we can walk you through any pitfalls.
That is basically what he relayed to me is that for him, the hassle of registering is not worth it. I just would like to see more potential in my small herd so that I do have the option to register other offspring. Yes that part was difficult because he doesn't know the dams, just a guess as to who. Thankfully Angus Assoc has the DNA on file so it shouldn't be too bad. Now I do have a question about since I purchased these from him, do we have to go through any sort of transfer of ownership? Or would that be a no since I own them now and I am the one registering them?
 

Hpacres440p

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That is basically what he relayed to me is that for him, the hassle of registering is not worth it. I just would like to see more potential in my small herd so that I do have the option to register other offspring. Yes that part was difficult because he doesn't know the dams, just a guess as to who. Thankfully Angus Assoc has the DNA on file so it shouldn't be too bad. Now I do have a question about since I purchased these from him, do we have to go through any sort of transfer of ownership? Or would that be a no since I own them now and I am the one registering them?
For some breeds, the owner of the dam at time of birth has to submit the registration. You may be able to do all the legwork for him, but he may still have to agree to let you use his name to register and tattoo. Hope that isn’t the case for you.
 

CowsRcuddly

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That is basically what he relayed to me is that for him, the hassle of registering is not worth it. I just would like to see more potential in my small herd so that I do have the option to register other offspring. Yes that part was difficult because he doesn't know the dams, just a guess as to who. Thankfully Angus Assoc has the DNA on file so it shouldn't be too bad. Now I do have a question about since I purchased these from him, do we have to go through any sort of transfer of ownership? Or would that be a no since I own them now and I am the one registering them?
Since the dams are registered in his name...he will have to register the heifers and transfer them to you. This brings up another problem. If he hasn't kept up registrations, ect. he may not be keeping up his membership with the association. He will have to be an active member ($80 per year) to register them and transfer.
 

CowsRcuddly

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Keep up updated, and if you need any help, I can walk you through most of it. Hope the dams and sires are all DNA tested. That will help make things easier.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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For some breeds, the owner of the dam at time of birth has to submit the registration. You may be able to do all the legwork for him, but he may still have to agree to let you use his name to register and tattoo. Hope that isn’t the case for you.
Can you please explain what “tattoo” means?
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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Since the dams are registered in his name...he will have to register the heifers and transfer them to you. This brings up another problem. If he hasn't kept up registrations, ect. he may not be keeping up his membership with the association. He will have to be an active member ($80 per year) to register them and transfer.
Yes that’s the issue I ran into when I called Angus Assoc. He doesn’t have a membership. I’m now wondering if I should just not bother with registering these heifers.... I’m learning from my mistakes!
 

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