Got a flu shot yet?

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Davemk

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greybeard said:
Davemk said:
This years flu shot was decided upon last February. The last 3 years avg efficacy is under 30%.
What was the efficacy of the control group? (those who didn't get the flu shot)

I am quoting CDC statistics. I have no idea how they come up with that number. They(CDC) are already reporting that this years flu shot will have an even lower efficacy rate.
 

Bright Raven

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Davemk said:
greybeard said:
Davemk said:
This years flu shot was decided upon last February. The last 3 years avg efficacy is under 30%.
What was the efficacy of the control group? (those who didn't get the flu shot)

I am quoting CDC statistics. I have no idea how they come up with that number. They(CDC) are already reporting that this years flu shot will have an even lower efficacy rate.

The process for producing vaccines involves the same challenges for a wide range of pathogens not just influenza viruses. Microorganisms change rapidly and there are many serovars with in the same species.

I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this. At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.
 

Davemk

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Bright Raven said:
Davemk said:
greybeard said:
What was the efficacy of the control group? (those who didn't get the flu shot)

I am quoting CDC statistics. I have no idea how they come up with that number. They(CDC) are already reporting that this years flu shot will have an even lower efficacy rate.

The process for producing vaccines involves the same challenges for a wide range of pathogens not just influenza viruses. Microorganisms change rapidly and there are many serovars with in the same species.

I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this. At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.

Ron my friend this is one of those subjects that we are just going to have to disagree. I just am not the kind of person to put things in my body that have that low of a chance of actually working.

Just as a FYI I am not anti vaccine.
 

Bright Raven

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Davemk said:
Bright Raven said:
Davemk said:
I am quoting CDC statistics. I have no idea how they come up with that number. They(CDC) are already reporting that this years flu shot will have an even lower efficacy rate.

The process for producing vaccines involves the same challenges for a wide range of pathogens not just influenza viruses. Microorganisms change rapidly and there are many serovars with in the same species.

I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this. At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.

Ron my friend this is one of those subjects that we are just going to have to disagree. I just am not the kind of person to put things in my body that have that low of a chance of actually working.

Just as a FYI I am not anti vaccine.

I fully appreciate that.
 

TexasBred

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Bright Raven said:
Davemk said:
greybeard said:
What was the efficacy of the control group? (those who didn't get the flu shot)

I am quoting CDC statistics. I have no idea how they come up with that number. They(CDC) are already reporting that this years flu shot will have an even lower efficacy rate.

The process for producing vaccines involves the same challenges for a wide range of pathogens not just influenza viruses. Microorganisms change rapidly and there are many serovars with in the same species.

I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this. At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.
Screw'em …. let'em die.
 

Son of Butch

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TexasBred said:
Bright Raven said:
I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this.
At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.
Screw'em …. let'em die.
A very cruel thing to think, let alone say. Especially when talking about children under 6 yrs of age.
As responsible adults we have the duty to protect the young who might become innocent victims.
 

Redgully

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Son of Butch said:
TexasBred said:
Bright Raven said:
I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this.
At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.
Screw'em …. let'em die.
A very cruel thing to think, let alone say. Especially when talking about children under 6 yrs of age.
As responsible adults we have the duty to protect the young who might become innocent victims.

Pretty sure it was said tongue in cheek....
 

Bright Raven

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Son of Butch said:
TexasBred said:
Bright Raven said:
I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this.
At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.
Screw'em …. let'em die.
A very cruel thing to think, let alone say. Especially when talking about children under 6 yrs of age.
As responsible adults we have the duty to protect the young who might become innocent victims.

TB was not directing that toward children. You know TB better than that. That post was made for "shock and awe" effects.

BTW: Dave, I respect individuality and personal independence. I have no problem if anyone decides not to get a flu vaccination even if the vaccine is 100 % effective. My comments were made in an effort to provide correct information. The process of producing an annual influenza vaccine follows epidemiological science.
 

TexasBred

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Son of Butch said:
TexasBred said:
Bright Raven said:
I looked at the specific efficacy reports you mentioned but I also found this.
At the end of the day, if you are in a high risk group, any level of efficacy is worthwhile.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

CDC conducts studies each year to determine how well the influenza (flu) vaccine protects against flu illness. While vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary, recent studies show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40% and 60% among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine. In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A(H1N1) viruses and offer lower protection against influenza A(H3N2) viruses. See “Does flu vaccine effectiveness vary by type or subtype?” and “Why is flu vaccine typically less effective against influenza A H3N2 viruses?” for more information.
Screw'em …. let'em die.
A very cruel thing to think, let alone say. Especially when talking about children under 6 yrs of age.
As responsible adults we have the duty to protect the young who might become innocent victims.
I'm not the one refusing to allow those children access to immunization Butch. That would be the parents.
 

Davemk

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TexasBred said:
Son of Butch said:
TexasBred said:
Screw'em …. let'em die.
A very cruel thing to think, let alone say. Especially when talking about children under 6 yrs of age.
As responsible adults we have the duty to protect the young who might become innocent victims.
I'm not the one refusing to allow those children access to immunization Butch. That would be the parents.

Wait are you guys talking about me? My kids have all been vaccinated.
 

haase

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I swear by them also, have never had it and probably only had the flu once in the last 25 years, not sure if working outdoors my whole life had anything to do with it, but I'd bet on it.
 

TexasBred

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haase said:
I swear by them also, have never had it and probably only had the flu once in the last 25 years, not sure if working outdoors my whole life had anything to do with it, but I'd bet on it.

Got mine Friday at the pharmacy. Got the "old folks" version with the double or triple strength. Took about 5 minutes and medicare covered the cost.
 

Son of Butch

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New York Times reported an experimental vaccine for Tuberculosis looks promising being
45% effective in testing. Worldwide Tuberculosis kills 4,000 people per day.

Get that one figured out and maybe they can develop a vaccine for Johnes in cattle.
 

Bestoutwest

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cowgal604 said:
76 Bar said:
Geeze better in the top of the shoulder than your azz. ;-) Moist heat applied to the site works wonders. Not even close to the discomfort following a Tetanus booster. Buck up! :lol:

There is nothing more painful than a tetanus booster

There's one we use here to fight infection on open fractures (someone gets a finger smashed, so there's a laceration and the bone is fractured). It goes in the butt, and is allegedly thick and awful. It's supposed to be way worse than tetanus. I hope it's nothing I never experience.
 

Bright Raven

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Bestoutwest said:
cowgal604 said:
76 Bar said:
Geeze better in the top of the shoulder than your azz. ;-) Moist heat applied to the site works wonders. Not even close to the discomfort following a Tetanus booster. Buck up! :lol:

There is nothing more painful than a tetanus booster

There's one we use here to fight infection on open fractures (someone gets a finger smashed, so there's a laceration and the bone is fractured). It goes in the butt, and is allegedly thick and awful. It's supposed to be way worse than tetanus. I hope it's nothing I never experience.

Yes. That is a gamma globulin injection. It uses tissue from other donors to boost immunity. I got one the first two times I went to Africa. It is not without risk. I got mine after they started screening donors but at one time there was a fear of getting hepatitis or even AIDS from the shot.

You drop your pants and get it in the gluteus maximus. Oh gosh, it is not fun. The last two times I went to Africa, I passed on it.
 

dieselbeef

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didn't get the shot..got the flu tho..does that count? kid had it for 10 days..i got it now..o my 4th day...never realized that much water could come out of yer butt
 

CG1

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Bright Raven said:
Bestoutwest said:
cowgal604 said:
There is nothing more painful than a tetanus booster

There's one we use here to fight infection on open fractures (someone gets a finger smashed, so there's a laceration and the bone is fractured). It goes in the butt, and is allegedly thick and awful. It's supposed to be way worse than tetanus. I hope it's nothing I never experience.

Yes. That is a gamma globulin injection. It uses tissue from other donors to boost immunity. I got one the first two times I went to Africa. It is not without risk. I got mine after they started screening donors but at one time there was a fear of getting hepatitis or even AIDS from the shot.

You drop your pants and get it in the gluteus maximus. Oh gosh, it is not fun. The last two times I went to Africa, I passed on it.

I think that's the same shot you get when you have a baby with positive blood and you're negative? I had one with my son. 2 of them. First one they put in my thigh and I refused to let them do it there again, I couldn't walk for days!!! Luckily they gave me the next one in my arm. But...I took 181 shots in the butt muscle when I was pregnant. Not an exaggeration haha. I am now tough as nails :bang:
 

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