Got a couple pictures

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went through real quick had the boss waiting to preg check heifers so couldn't take as many photos as I wanted. This is a young cow probably the smallest cow in her contemporary group but when one raises a calf the way she is I don't care what size she is she is getting the job done

Gizmo Eriskay E76 C4 C37AAA 19145157
298C1889-F5D7-41E1-9FB8-EBEE84596682.jpegher heifer calf is out of Coleman Resolve.
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A SAV Grass Roots calf I purchased the semen from this bull from one of our CT members, I sure like the direction he is going with his herd. The dam of this calf is SAV Reign out of our foundation Duchess cow that was a direct daughter of the great Graham Duchess 55 cow.
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Just another angle of the same calf then had to get to work. I really wanted to get a photo of the bull we are using natural cover he is pretty neat but he was also working so no pic dang it.
 
We have added copper and still can't get the red out.
What is the source of the copper you are using? Copper sulfate is the best as far as being utilized by the cow, not copper chloride or copper oxide.

Chelated copper might be warranted in your case, but find out what exactly is chelated and how much of it is chelated. Chelated is a buzz word that most don't understand and I don't think some of the mineral companies do either. (and neither do I, but I'm going to attend a meeting on it so I am more knowledgeable.)

One thing though, the cows are good and black; copper deficiency usually shows up in a triangle on the cows wither (right in front of the shoulder); it's the shaggy hair on the calves that is red/brown. The calf in the first photo is very rough-haired so there is something not quite right.
The cows are shiney, why aren't the calves? What are you feeding your cows?
I'm scratching my head, I don't think I've seen it before where the cows are slick-haired, but the calves aren't...but I've never been in Florida either. Is that a common thing there?
 
She will no doubt shed that out before long..if she didn't, then Id be concerned
 
"They" say that a picture is worth a thousand words. Here are 4 calves born from Sept 22 to Oct 10th. Three bulls and one heifer. One 2 way crossbred calf. Two purebred calves. And one sired by a crossbred bull out of a purebred cow. Can you spot which is which? These pictures are not from the internet. All from one pasture in the SE US taken today. Just fescue calves. Which one is sired by a mongrel crossbred bull?
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Deja vu. I posted the above pictures of some calves last year in a thread about mongrel crossbred bulls. Had the same comments about copper and needing a better mineral. That may be correct, but the bull calves last year had an average weaning weight of 755# and heifer calves averaged 668#. No respiratory or other health issues with the calves. Most cows bred back AI on first or second service. Calves shed that red hair as they get a little age on them. I wish they were bright colored from birth, but don't see any bad issues with their color. Maybe we have different pigments in the south.

A recent picture of a couple replacements from that calf crop (one is the first calf pictured above). No more red. Same minerals and management. Calves this year have that red tinge hair again.
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Deja vu. I posted the above pictures of some calves last year in a thread about mongrel crossbred bulls. Had the same comments about copper and needing a better mineral. That may be correct, but the bull calves last year had an average weaning weight of 755# and heifer calves averaged 668#. No respiratory or other health issues with the calves. Most cows bred back AI on first or second service. Calves shed that red hair as they get a little age on them. I wish they were bright colored from birth, but don't see any bad issues with their color. Maybe we have different pigments in the south.

A recent picture of a couple replacements from that calf crop (one is the first calf pictured above). No more red. Same minerals and management. Calves this year have that red tinge hair again.
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Im not worried if you aren't, just making comments on what I see. We once had those red tinges or the same hair type in our red cattle. We don't see them any more. Sorry if sharing my experience ruffled a feather.
 
We have a few every year that have the red tinge this year we have more hair than I like seeing I am in hope that it is just Mother Nature doing what she does best. For us it has been wet and cold but also hot and humid a true roller coaster in regard to weather this winter. We were doing our AI work the Friday before Christmas and the boss started giving me the devil about the sorry syringe I had him using. I told him it was the same type we had used for the past 25 years lol finally figured out the gnrh was freezing in the dang needle. You northern folk probably are use to dealing with that kind of cold but it was totally new for us. We got it figured out but by golly I live in Florida for a reason and 9 degree temps is not suppose to be on our weather agenda.F9CF0565-F4DF-4746-9391-915C476C672A.jpegE4E6ADA4-2F1D-40C2-B443-57629C599017.jpeg
here are a couple of photos from 2020 still have the red but not near the hair. I will try to remember to pull a tag on the minerals when I'm at the farm tomorrow. The calves seem healthy we have them scheduled for a worming in two weeks our winter pastures have not kicked in yet so they are on crap pastures which can load them upon worms. It really has been a rough wet winter.
 
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Im not worried if you aren't, just making comments on what I see. We once had those red tinges or the same hair type in our red cattle. We don't see them any more. Sorry if sharing my experience ruffled a feather.
No, my feathers are not ruffled at all. I appreciate all the comments and observations. Please continue to share. As I said, I would rather they not have that appearance. But it has not appeared to affect their growth, health or fertility in our herd here. We have used copasure bolus in the past, various mineral manufacturers (none cheap) and still they often have that hair when they are young. I was also sharing my experience and what I see here. No harm done.
 
Gcreekrch
Your comments are always welcome and appreciated. I honestly don't know if it's an issue the calves seem to be growing well but I don't like seeing the shaggy hair or the red. It isn't in all the calves, it could be a mineral deficiency I'm going to pull tags on minerals today.
 
Gcreekrch
Your comments are always welcome and appreciated. I honestly don't know if it's an issue the calves seem to be growing well but I don't like seeing the shaggy hair or the red. It isn't in all the calves, it could be a mineral deficiency I'm going to pull tags on minerals today.
Feed samples, water, soil, tissue, they all add up together. We were nearly ten years getting ours to where it worked. When done it was 25% cheaper than the commercial mineral that is available.
 
We have a few every year that have the red tinge this year we have more hair than I like seeing I am in hope that it is just Mother Nature doing what she does best. For us it has been wet and cold but also hot and humid a true roller coaster in regard to weather this winter. We were doing our AI work the Friday before Christmas and the boss started giving me the devil about the sorry syringe I had him using. I told him it was the same type we had used for the past 25 years lol finally figured out the gnrh was freezing in the dang needle. You northern folk probably are use to dealing with that kind of cold but it was totally new for us. We got it figured out but by golly I live in Florida for a reason and 9 degree temps is not suppose to be on our weather agenda.View attachment 25799View attachment 25800
here are a couple of photos from 2020 still have the red but not near the hair. I will try to remember to pull a tag on the minerals when I'm at the farm tomorrow. The calves seem healthy we have them scheduled for a worming in two weeks our winter pastures have not kicked in yet so they are on crap pastures which can load them upon worms. It really has been a rough wet winter.
It is my experience that what you are seeing here will go away when they shed this hair. I wouldn't say it was from copper deficiency. When we found out our health issues were caused by copper deficiency, our cows had the tell-tale reddish triangle on their withers. We didn't even notice it but the mineral area manager did. We got on a good mineral and it changed everything. He used before and after pictures of our cows to show the difference. It was dramatic. The mineral program we went on changed our operation. No more doctoring sick cattle. It's an 8-year long story and I won't bore you with it, but we were about ready to quit. I had called veterinarians, feed dealers, universities, and no one knew the cause of the sickness in our calves. We even moved across the state. That year (1993) the calves got sick there, just like before. (Now we know the copper deficiency lowered their immune system). That's when I heard about mineral. We called the area manager, he came down, told us what we had going on and... the rest is history. No more problems. Seriously.
 
We have a few every year that have the red tinge this year we have more hair than I like seeing I am in hope that it is just Mother Nature doing what she does best. For us it has been wet and cold but also hot and humid a true roller coaster in regard to weather this winter. We were doing our AI work the Friday before Christmas and the boss started giving me the devil about the sorry syringe I had him using. I told him it was the same type we had used for the past 25 years lol finally figured out the gnrh was freezing in the dang needle. You northern folk probably are use to dealing with that kind of cold but it was totally new for us. We got it figured out but by golly I live in Florida for a reason and 9 degree temps is not suppose to be on our weather agenda.View attachment 25799View attachment 25800
here are a couple of photos from 2020 still have the red but not near the hair. I will try to remember to pull a tag on the minerals when I'm at the farm tomorrow. The calves seem healthy we have them scheduled for a worming in two weeks our winter pastures have not kicked in yet so they are on crap pastures which can load them upon worms. It really has been a rough wet winter.
That 2014 is a chunk. I LIKE 'im. I'd take a pasture full of him all day long.
 

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