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Anonymous

I have been running a small commercial herd for about 12 years. I am trying to increase my profit margin and am considering to start a registered Angus program. What is the most economical method? I am considering buying a few registered head and then using them to transplant embryos to my mother cows. Where can I get information on embryo transplants?

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Anonymous

Give the attached link a shot concerning ET. Talk to some serious seedstock producers and see what their thoughts are. We looked into this a while back, based on the amount of showing and other exposure required to be successful we pulled the plug on the idea. The real money in seedstock is selling bulls. There are a lot of seedstock producers that aren't doing any better then the commercial segment. We are goinmg to try selling at one of the Red Angus sponsered influence sales next fall to see if it pays any better. Some Red Angus breeders feel that they get a little more for their calves at these sales over their normal sales channels.

dunmovin farms

> I have been running a small
> commercial herd for about 12
> years. I am trying to increase my
> profit margin and am considering
> to start a registered Angus
> program. What is the most
> economical method? I am
> considering buying a few
> registered head and then using
> them to transplant embryos to my
> mother cows. Where can I get
> information on embryo transplants?

Trans-Ova
 
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A

Anonymous

The most economical route will be buying quality stock from an established program. Not the high priced over popular programs, but solid herds with years of experience.

You can buy bred heifers for generally a couple hundred dollars over commercial prices at many production sales. Talk to the owner and tell him what you are looking for. Some will allow you to buy a bred heifer from them then sell the offspring back through their sale the following year.

I have had many customers double, triple or even quadruple their money on a heifer purchased through our sale. We also offer a cattle on shares program where you own the animal but we manage her. That might be a safe way to get into registered stock. You only need one, and can get some experience while sharing the risk.

Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus Farms Alberta Canada

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Anonymous

A large Angus breeder who does a lot of ET work told me he has about $1000 in a weaned ET calf. That's fine for his females; I've seen his cows sell for up to $10,000 at his production sales. But he hasn't got his bull sales working yet and half those ET calves will be bulls. In my area you can buy a well-bred Angus (the original color) heifer for $1,000 to $1,800, depending on age, breeding status, etc. Considering that you'll have almost three years in an ET calf before she's in production (if you get a heifer), you might be better off to buy some good bred heifers.

> Give the attached link a shot
> concerning ET. Talk to some
> serious seedstock producers and
> see what their thoughts are. We
> looked into this a while back,
> based on the amount of showing and
> other exposure required to be
> successful we pulled the plug on
> the idea. The real money in
> seedstock is selling bulls. There
> are a lot of seedstock producers
> that aren't doing any better then
> the commercial segment. We are
> goinmg to try selling at one of
> the Red Angus sponsered influence
> sales next fall to see if it pays
> any better. Some Red Angus
> breeders feel that they get a
> little more for their calves at
> these sales over their normal
> sales channels.

> dunmovin farms

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Anonymous

Now you know the original Angus were both red and black.
> A large Angus breeder who does a
> lot of ET work told me he has
> about $1000 in a weaned ET calf.
> That's fine for his females; I've
> seen his cows sell for up to
> $10,000 at his production sales.
> But he hasn't got his bull sales
> working yet and half those ET
> calves will be bulls. In my area
> you can buy a well-bred Angus (the
> original color) heifer for $1,000
> to $1,800, depending on age,
> breeding status, etc. Considering
> that you'll have almost three
> years in an ET calf before she's
> in production (if you get a
> heifer), you might be better off
> to buy some good bred heifers.
 
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A

Anonymous

Where are you located? The <A HREF="http://www.angus.org">www.angus.org</A> site has names and email addresses of many breeders, sorted by state. You might email some of those. And the fall sale season is in full swing; there should be some production sales in your area.

Thanks for all the input. Buying
> weaned or bred heifers was my
> first choice too, but I need to
> try to find a seller.

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Anonymous

We have a quality Angus herd and will be down sizing due to a bank with no horse sense! On November 10th we will be dispersing all our Spring calving cows. We are not getting out of the business. We are keeping our fall calving herd, our bred heifers and our weaned heifers. There are many daughters of top bulls such as PAPA Universe 515. All but one will be 3 to 7 years old this spring. There are four or five pathfinders. All have complete EPDs including Ultrasound Carcass EPDs. All are bred to top AI sires with high quality cleanup bulls used on those not settled AI. Vet estimates as to which bull they are due to. You wouldn't have a chance at these girls if we had a better banker! Email me personally for a catalog.

Diana Bodensteiner Pure Genetics Angus Moravia, IA

Transportation can be arranged.

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