EAST TENNESSEE market prices

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Jim62

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I, too, don't think anything. Just looks like a bunch of numbers to me.

So, what were cattle bringing at the sale?
 

dieselbeef

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those being avgs are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay higher than waht were getting round here..fla just dont make much money cattlewise..too far to ship em i guess..we never see numbers like that
 

hillsdown

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600 lbs at 15 months for a steer, is it a Dexter. That seems light no matter what breed .

I don't know what it is there but last year the dollars really changed for feeders, heavies were getting top dollar and the smaller lighter ones got bare minimum ,their reason being because they have to feed them longer. Kinda makes sense.

As far as prices, we for once agree SL; if I was the seller I would have wanted more at least to break even , and if I was the buyer I would think it is hi way robbery.

If you have one death as a calf or yearling your profit is gone and you will not even break even . If we all lived in a perfect world those prices would be acceptable.
 
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ga. prime

ga. prime

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Sirloin, you shouldn't have more than 12 months charged to a cow per calf. More than that and you need to be swapping out cows.
 

Brandonm22

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To be in this buiness a long time 90 cents a pound needs to be break even, at least for the cash inputs, for ~560 pound feeder calves. If you lose money at $1.04, I would argue that you will lose money ~6 or 7 out of ten years. IF you sell 100 calves a year, and break even is at $1.04 even at $1.30 you only make $14560 in the best of times, hardly enough return to investment and certainly not enough to cover your losses in a really down year.....something we have not seen in a long while though last fall got a little scary. Now HOW you get your feed, fertilizer, hay, and machinery costs (normally the big four) down low enough that you break even at $.90 a pound (and if you sell heavier calves your breakeven typically needs to be lower per pound as they typically bring less per pound), I don't know.
 

Susie David

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The prices have been running pretty much average for this time of year. Last year was odd, near late summer the big steers (9-10-11 wts) were bringing over a buck a pound...more than the feeders. We did have a big jump in hay prices due to the drought but now folks are advertizing last years hay for dirt cheep looks like some are stuck with a barn full and the alfalfa is starting to grow and they are getting worried...we'll see how this year looks. I just may stick around for a few more years.
DMC
 

dieselbeef

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Brandonm22":1vqjndse said:
To be in this buiness a long time 90 cents a pound needs to be break even, at least for the cash inputs, for ~560 pound feeder calves. If you lose money at $1.04, I would argue that you will lose money ~6 or 7 out of ten years. IF you sell 100 calves a year, and break even is at $1.04 even at $1.30 you only make $14560 in the best of times, hardly enough return to investment and certainly not enough to cover your losses in a really down year.....something we have not seen in a long while though last fall got a little scary. Now HOW you get your feed, fertilizer, hay, and machinery costs (normally the big four) down low enough that you break even at $.90 a pound (and if you sell heavier calves your breakeven typically needs to be lower per pound as they typically bring less per pound), I don't know.

and all this isnt counting taxes or mortgages if appl. i dont see how its possible to make any money..i almost broke even once...but i didnt count anything that didnt apply to the cows. like the mortgage on the prop i live on. that tax and mortagae would be there w/or w/o the cows so it didnt count.
seriusly look at that figure of less than 15k. thats not even poverty. if everything you do and have is thru the biz of cattle you might have off all yer living exp too(most) but at 15k ya cant even put gas in yer truck and feed yer family...i dont understand how people live w/o an outside job
 
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ga. prime

ga. prime

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Sirloin, you're not keeping it simple enough. What I'm simply saying is that if your cows aren't producing a calf every 12 months, then you should get some that do. They are very common. Don't you agree that a calf every 12 months beats a calf every 15 months? The cost to carry a cow 12 months between calves sold is significantly less than the cost to carry a cow 15 months between calves sold. Right?
 

dun

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Wouldn;t you need to know when a calf is born to be able to figure the calving interval?
 

Brandonm22

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what?":32yj6r5o said:
the cow is bred back in less than 12 months but you charge each calf for 15 months cow time.
After that heifer year, most of us have cows with a calf on the teat AND one in the womb for ~3 months. In your unique accounting system which calf gets charged for those ~3 months?
 

bigag03

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SL,
True. And I seek them out. I would love to have a whole herd of cows that breed back between 30 and 60 days because about every 5th calendar year I would have two crops of calves in that same year.

Sign of a real pro :roll:
Lets just let them calve year round and hope they are backing up every year.

SL, I am not one to get into personal attacks, but let me pass on this advice:
It is better to keep one's mouth shut and be thought a fool, than to open it and remove all doubt.
 

Brandonm22

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dieselbeef":2wtoro3g said:
seriusly look at that figure of less than 15k. thats not even poverty. if everything you do and have is thru the biz of cattle you might have off all yer living exp too(most) but at 15k ya cant even put gas in yer truck and feed yer family.

That was my point. IF your enterprise is losing money at $1.04 /lb you are still struggling EVEN at $1.30 /lb. To be a viable stand alone business, your breakeven needs to be $.90 or less and even there you will still lose money some years.

Yes, obviously property taxes on the ranch ARE a business expense you report on the Schedule F, though if you itemize you also have the option of taking all the property taxes on the Schedule A to calculate your personal exemption. It would be a case by case basis as to where you want that amount reported (just DON'T do both in the same tax year!).
 

aussie_cowgirl

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You shouldn't attribute the months that a calf is in the womb unless the cow hasn't got a calf at foot. Otherwise you are over lapping. You are saying that both the calf on foot and calf in the womb are both expenses when really you should just count the one at foot SL. Say if you mate a cow when she has a calf 3 months old at foot and then you wean the calf at 9 months, that's 6 months of expenses that should be attributed to the calf at foot. Once the calf is weaned the time then belongs to the calf in the womb. So you have for one calf 3 months in the womb + 9 months at foot = 12 months. Get it SL?
 
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ga. prime

ga. prime

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The cost of getting a cow to the first calf and the money you get for her at cull time must be amortized among all calves sold off her during her lifetime. What we're talking about here is whether you sell a calf off a cow every 12 months or every 15 months. Brandon is needlessly clouding the issue.. If you only sell a calf off a cow every 15 months, that's what I'd call unique.
 

aussie_cowgirl

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But SL the energy used by a cow during the first 3 trimester in the womb is the same as an open cow. So there is no cost involved in any way from that calf's first 3 months. So it still works out to be 12 months. If you use your head you make money. You don't need all these pointless schematas. People are well aware of these things.
 

aussie_cowgirl

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Holy moly, wheels?

I think I've almost had enough of this. You're going on my blocked list SL. You do my head in and it frightens me to think that beginners would listen to you.
 
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