cow wil not lift tail

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Mem

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I have a cow who will not lift her tail or swish it back and forth?
 
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No it has not been broken.

She does not even lift to urinate, etc.

She had a calf this spring and seem to do well then about a month later noted her doing this.
 
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Sorry not sure how to reply to each person, still learning !
 
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aussie_cowgirl":2fuopnr0 said:
At all? Even when she is urinating etc?
even when she urinates, etc. This is causing her to attract more flie, etc.
 

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Hmm, well if she's not even swatting flies it seems that she's probably had some nerve damage which could mean she can't actually feel her tail. If it happened directly after she gave birth it could have been due to the birth itself. I guess it may be temporary like I have seen with cows sometimes (some cows when they give birth become paralysed in the hind quarters for a few hours, it's unusual but I have seen it happen) but if it's been a while it could be a permanent thing. And being a nerve issue the only way to fix it would probably be surgery which would be extremely costly. I'd be concerned though because if she isn't moving her tail it could result in all sorts of infections especially in the reproductive tract. How long has it been since she gave birth?
 
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aussie_cowgirl":17na0ziu said:
Hmm, well if she's not even swatting flies it seems that she's probably had some nerve damage which could mean she can't actually feel her tail. If it happened directly after she gave birth it could have been due to the birth itself. I guess it may be temporary like I have seen with cows sometimes (some cows when they give birth become paralysed in the hind quarters for a few hours, it's unusual but I have seen it happen) but if it's been a while it could be a permanent thing. And being a nerve issue the only way to fix it would probably be surgery which would be extremely costly. I'd be concerned though because if she isn't moving her tail it could result in all sorts of infections especially in the reproductive tract. How long has it been since she gave birth?
She did not do this at first, it was about a month or so after she gave birth that we noted this. We have separated her with a few others where she can get more feed etc. We are also looking into weening her calf early since she is like this in hopes that it will help. (calved in May)
 

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I wouldn't wean the calf off yet because that wouldn't be the reason why she's like that. Perhaps she got the tail caught or something like that. If you grab the tail does she notice? Maybe do a few tests like twisting the tail etc to see if you get a reaction. If she can't move it, it means the tail isn't receiving the nerve impulses/instructions from the brain telling it to move. It might seem extreme but I don't think there is a lot you will be able to do about it. You could ring the vet to get his opinion, but I think with that serious risk of infection, coupled with the fact she may not rebreed if she can't move her tail for a bull, there will be a lot of work involved with this cow in the future and you may want to think whether you are prepared to put in this extra effort.

I need to go to uni now but I will be back later on. Best of luck.
 
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aussie_cowgirl":30rg18kq said:
I wouldn't wean the calf off yet because that wouldn't be the reason why she's like that. Perhaps she got the tail caught or something like that. If you grab the tail does she notice? Maybe do a few tests like twisting the tail etc to see if you get a reaction. If she can't move it, it means the tail isn't receiving the nerve impulses/instructions from the brain telling it to move. It might seem extreme but I don't think there is a lot you will be able to do about it. You could ring the vet to get his opinion, but I think with that serious risk of infection, coupled with the fact she may not rebreed if she can't move her tail for a bull, there will be a lot of work involved with this cow in the future and you may want to think whether you are prepared to put in this extra effort.

I need to go to uni now but I will be back later on. Best of luck.
Thank you for your input, closing for now as it is getting late here in the States (USA)
 

aussie_cowgirl

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Keren":2bgp5tir said:
aussie brings up some good points.

I'm wondering whether docking might be an option? not ideal for welfare purposes, I know, but might extend her useful breeding life

Would other health risks be created from having that area exposed though?
 

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I'm not entirely sure. I havent had a great deal to do with tail docking. But in dairies, I dont think it causes too many health problems in that area. But - the question would be, how short to dock it? Because the dairies leave a fair stump there - and they can move the stump. If she cant move the stump, she's still gonna have breeding problems I would think.

Personally I find this fascinating and I'd experiment with removing the tail, but thats just me. I think a vet's opinion wouldnt go astray - talk is cheap (free).

A decision has to be made whether you want to spend the time, work, and money on this heifer, or to simply send her to the salebarn.
 

aussie_cowgirl

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I would think with a dairy stump it wouldn't stop her getting faeces in the reproductive tract and like you say, if she can't move it she still may have problems breeding. I think you'd have to cut it pretty short...

Vet talk is cheap unless they charge you $40/hr 'consultation' fees :roll:
 

ffamom

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We have an 10 year old cow that has the same problem. She damaged a nerve calving. It has been several years now and we have done nothing. She hasn't had an infection. One option might be to get it a wait and see approach.
 

mnmtranching

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A cow does not lift her tail when she urinates or craps to keep it clean :roll: Like she cares :???: It's a automatic reaction caused by bowel movement or arching the back. Messy rear ends are normal and usually with no problem. [like about always] I mean what kind of train wreak would we have if messy rear and tails caused health problems in cattle. :help:
She has a pinched nerve, maybe it will get better. DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT.
 

regolith

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Would other health risks be created from having that area exposed though?

Probably not. I have one who was injured bulling last year and has been exposed since - tailhead rolled to side. She's just calved successfully. And sheep in this country are usually left fully exposed - it might be illegal to dock that short, but it doesn't seem to cause any health problems.

Some cows get feces in their vulva continually because they're designed badly. I always figured they'd fail to breed sooner or later, but don't worry about it till it happens. Usually they do get in calf.
 

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