Cheyenne Bermuda

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gertman

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To any of you who have seeded it how do you like it for grazing and hay production? With normal rainfall how long before you could cut it or graze it?
 

BeefmasterB

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I never got that far with it because most of the seed didn't come up. My plan was to let take root for most of the year and maybe get one cutting of it. Then allow some grazing the following year. The seed is very expensive. Everything depends on how fast it roots which relies on moisture, nutrients and soil conditions (and let's not forget Mother Nature). What I liked about it was that it does not tend to revert back to Common Bermuda.
 

1982vett

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BeefmasterB":1bazuj2n said:
I never got that far with it because most of the seed didn't come up. My plan was to let take root for most of the year and maybe get one cutting of it. Then allow some grazing the following year. The seed is very expensive. Everything depends on how fast it roots which relies on moisture, nutrients and soil conditions (and let's not forget Mother Nature). What I liked about it was that it does not tend to revert back to Common Bermuda.


Hear that a lot. But what does it really mean? It sounds like the bermuda is one thing one day and the next, poof, it is common bermuda. I have my own explanation, but would like to hear from others.

Haven't planted any Cheyenne yet. Thought I bought a blend that had cheyenne in it but I was wrong when I read the label. Should have done that before I bought the seed. But I had the same luck as BeefmasterB, very little survived sprouting.
 

1982vett

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1982vett":6p747xfp said:
BeefmasterB":6p747xfp said:
I never got that far with it because most of the seed didn't come up. My plan was to let take root for most of the year and maybe get one cutting of it. Then allow some grazing the following year. The seed is very expensive. Everything depends on how fast it roots which relies on moisture, nutrients and soil conditions (and let's not forget Mother Nature). What I liked about it was that it does not tend to revert back to Common Bermuda.


Hear that a lot. But what does it really mean? It sounds like the bermuda is one thing one day and the next, poof, it is common bermuda. I have my own explanation, but would like to hear from others as well as answers to the original question.

Haven't planted any Cheyenne yet. Thought I bought a blend that had cheyenne in it but I was wrong when I read the label. Should have done that before I bought the seed. But I had the same luck as BeefmasterB, very little survived sprouting.
 

BeefmasterB

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1982vett":12herip3 said:
BeefmasterB":12herip3 said:
I never got that far with it because most of the seed didn't come up. My plan was to let take root for most of the year and maybe get one cutting of it. Then allow some grazing the following year. The seed is very expensive. Everything depends on how fast it roots which relies on moisture, nutrients and soil conditions (and let's not forget Mother Nature). What I liked about it was that it does not tend to revert back to Common Bermuda.


Hear that a lot. But what does it really mean? It sounds like the bermuda is one thing one day and the next, poof, it is common bermuda. I have my own explanation, but would like to hear from others.

Haven't planted any Cheyenne yet. Thought I bought a blend that had cheyenne in it but I was wrong when I read the label. Should have done that before I bought the seed. But I had the same luck as BeefmasterB, very little survived sprouting.

I guess it depends on how many drinks they had the night before :lol2: . Seriously, my understanding is that the likes of Mohawk, Rachero Frio, Giant etc was Common Bermuda engineered to grow taller, thicker etc. However, over 4-5 years, it would slowly revert back to plain Common Bermuda. Cheyenne Bermuda was engineered, somehow, as to not revert back. It's actually guaranteed not to revert back. The problem with the mixed bermuda grass seed is that Common is more agressive than the hybrid seed so, the hybrid gets overwhelmed by the Common. One of the problems with Giant was while it outperformed many of the sprigged varieties, it could not persist due to it's inability to reseed itself fast enough so, it tends to slowly "expire".
 

1982vett

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BeefmasterB":ndfeqd0s said:
1982vett":ndfeqd0s said:
BeefmasterB":ndfeqd0s said:
I never got that far with it because most of the seed didn't come up. My plan was to let take root for most of the year and maybe get one cutting of it. Then allow some grazing the following year. The seed is very expensive. Everything depends on how fast it roots which relies on moisture, nutrients and soil conditions (and let's not forget Mother Nature). What I liked about it was that it does not tend to revert back to Common Bermuda.


Hear that a lot. But what does it really mean? It sounds like the bermuda is one thing one day and the next, poof, it is common bermuda. I have my own explanation, but would like to hear from others.

Haven't planted any Cheyenne yet. Thought I bought a blend that had cheyenne in it but I was wrong when I read the label. Should have done that before I bought the seed. But I had the same luck as BeefmasterB, very little survived sprouting.

I guess it depends on how many drinks they had the night before :lol2: . Seriously, my understanding is that the likes of Mohawk, Rachero Frio, Giant etc was Common Bermuda engineered to grow taller, thicker etc. However, over 4-5 years, it would slowly revert back to plain Common Bermuda. Cheyenne Bermuda was engineered, somehow, as to not revert back. It's actually guaranteed not to revert back. The problem with the mixed bermuda grass seed is that Common is more agressive than the hybrid seed so, the hybrid gets overwhelmed by the Common. One of the problems with Giant was while it outperformed many of the sprigged varieties, it could not persist due to it's inability to reseed itself fast enough so, it tends to slowly "expire".

Bingo, that is what I believe. It is not that it transforms itself into common but is choked out by it. Therefore Cheyenne is probably able to withstand the pressure and out grow the common. So using the term "revert" might be misleading, depending on if you think a glass is half full or half empty.

Now if Cheyenne is as drought tolerant and cold tolerant as Giant. It should be some good stuff.

From what I see about the Giant, it tends to grow more upright than laterally so spreading by runners is a problem and probably adds to its weakness when mixed with other bermudas.
 

hardyboy

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From my experience any seeded variety bermuda is tough to get started. You need it buried at the right depth and rain at the right time. I have planted it many times and have it came up and die. My success/failure rate has been 10% sucess /90% failure

I also agree it doesn't revert back, it gets smothered out.
 

Douglas

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I have had good result when i have the land very firm before seeding using a cultipacker. I have several bags left over if anyone needs any, i understand it is in short supply.
 
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