Breeding

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Anonymous

I have a crossbred heifer who's primarily Angus, with Hereford and Charlaise in the background. What would be the advantages/disadvantages of breeding her to a Jersey for her first calf? She'll be approximately 31 months at first calving.

Ann

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OP
A

Anonymous

You would probably get a small calf with little value. Breed her to a known calving ease angus, if she is going to throw big calves because of the charolais she'll do it with a jersey. At least with the angus you will have a high quality calf.

dunmovin farms

> I have a crossbred heifer who's
> primarily Angus, with Hereford and
> Charlaise in the background. What
> would be the
> advantages/disadvantages of
> breeding her to a Jersey for her
> first calf? She'll be
> approximately 31 months at first
> calving.

> Ann
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Would there be anything wrong with such a calf for our own meat use? I have a Jersey bull. Going with anything else would most likely have to involve AI.

Ann

> You would probably get a small
> calf with little value. Breed her
> to a known calving ease angus, if
> she is going to throw big calves
> because of the charolais she'll do
> it with a jersey. At least with
> the angus you will have a high
> quality calf.

> dunmovin farms

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Nothing at all wrong with it. You just won't have as heavy a carcass or be able to finish it to the same degree. It is claimed by some, that Jersey beef is better marbled then anything else except angus, and is very tender. Good eating.

dunmovin farms

> Would there be anything wrong with
> such a calf for our own meat use?
> I have a Jersey bull. Going with
> anything else would most likely
> have to involve AI.

> Ann
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Sounds like I got a plan then!

Since it's just the 2 of us now, a smaller beef would be great -- might even leave me with a little extra freezer space. And since we do all of our own butchering, a smaller animal would be easier to work with.

And I learned a BIG lesson this year -- halterbroke beef is MUCH easier to work with! Calmly lead the animal right to where you are going to butcher it at -- before, we had to shoot the animal in the pen and then drag it out with the tractor, sometimes marring the hide. Since I tan and use the hide, I much prefer not to damage it.

Thanks so much Dunmovin, You've been a big help and taken a big load off of my mind. It may be another year before she gets bred, but I was starting to sweat having to take that heifer to a bull, or having to bring a bull to her, and I've done a lot of checking and AI is uncommon and very expensive around here. My only other really feasible option was to rent a trailer, load her up, and drive her 4 hours to my dad's place and have her bred to a Red Angus. But that's in another state and would require health certificate, etc. If I can get a "reasonable" meat animal by using the Jersey that I already have, then that's the way to go. Maybe in future years I'll get lucky and find someone who will AI her and it not cost me as much as buying a calf. (the semen's cheap, it's the fee charged by the person doing it that makes it so prohibitive) Thanks again

Ann

> Nothing at all wrong with it. You
> just won't have as heavy a carcass
> or be able to finish it to the
> same degree. It is claimed by
> some, that Jersey beef is better
> marbled then anything else except
> angus, and is very tender. Good
> eating.

> dunmovin farms

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

YThe longer you wait to breed her the less chance you will have of getting conception. Not bred and feeding as calf contributes to fat which is detrimental to fertility.

dunmovin farms

> Sounds like I got a plan then!

> Since it's just the 2 of us now, a
> smaller beef would be great --
> might even leave me with a little
> extra freezer space. And since we
> do all of our own butchering, a
> smaller animal would be easier to
> work with.

> And I learned a BIG lesson this
> year -- halterbroke beef is MUCH
> easier to work with! Calmly lead
> the animal right to where you are
> going to butcher it at -- before,
> we had to shoot the animal in the
> pen and then drag it out with the
> tractor, sometimes marring the
> hide. Since I tan and use the
> hide, I much prefer not to damage
> it.

> Thanks so much Dunmovin, You've
> been a big help and taken a big
> load off of my mind. It may be
> another year before she gets bred,
> but I was starting to sweat having
> to take that heifer to a bull, or
> having to bring a bull to her, and
> I've done a lot of checking and AI
> is uncommon and very expensive
> around here. My only other really
> feasible option was to rent a
> trailer, load her up, and drive
> her 4 hours to my dad's place and
> have her bred to a Red Angus. But
> that's in another state and would
> require health certificate, etc.
> If I can get a
> "reasonable" meat animal
> by using the Jersey that I already
> have, then that's the way to go.
> Maybe in future years I'll get
> lucky and find someone who will AI
> her and it not cost me as much as
> buying a calf. (the semen's cheap,
> it's the fee charged by the person
> doing it that makes it so
> prohibitive) Thanks again

> Ann
 
OP
A

Anonymous

We've talked about this heifer before, she was an orphan fall calf and I want to breed her for spring calves. Currently, she's 7 months, which would put her at just over 21 months at first breeding.

Ann

> YThe longer you wait to breed her
> the less chance you will have of
> getting conception. Not bred and
> feeding as calf contributes to fat
> which is detrimental to fertility.

> dunmovin farms

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

I misread your first post that she would be 31 months "at calving" not when bred. Sorry about that

dunmovin farms

> I have a crossbred heifer who's
> primarily Angus, with Hereford and
> Charlaise in the background. What
> would be the
> advantages/disadvantages of
> breeding her to a Jersey for her
> first calf? She'll be
> approximately 31 months at first
> calving.

> Ann
 

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