average life expectancy

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Anonymous

> Can someone tell me the average
> life expectancy of a cow?

It could range from less than a day to well over twenty years. It depends on the type of cow and how the cow is managed. The average dairy cow in comfiment usually last about two lactations or four to five years old. A beef cow on pasture in moderate climate can last over twenty years with proper care.

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Anonymous

In the United States the average age of a cow in profitable herds is culled by the time she hit 6 years old.
 
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Anonymous

> In the United States the average
> age of a cow in profitable herds
> is culled by the time she hit 6
> years old.

I agree, however the question was "how long is the life expectancy", not the management expectancy.



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Anonymous

The good ones don't live long enough, the pains in the butt live too long

dun

> I agree, however the question was
> "how long is the life
> expectancy", not the
> management expectancy.
 
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Anonymous

> Can someone tell me the average
> life expectancy of a cow?

The breeds that I have experience with,South Devon will still be very functional till 15 or 16 years,Brahmans productive till 18 to 20. Herefords last till about 10. Usually most breeders cull most of their cows by ten or so, because of space and bloodlines and the need to replace them with younger stock.



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Anonymous

> In the United States the average
> age of a cow in profitable herds
> is culled by the time she hit 6
> years old. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~thats how they make there profit.there is a big market for healthy bread 6 year brood cows.even at sell barn.there not culled because they are bad cattle.~~~~~~~Tc
 
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Anonymous

> In the United States the average
> age of a cow in profitable herds
> is culled by the time she hit 6
> years old.

The only thing (in a commercial herd that culling cows at the age of six or even worse at an AVERAGE age of six) has to do with profit, is inversely proportionate. That isn't the most ridiculus statement I have read on this board but it is a close second.
 
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Anonymous

> The only thing (in a commercial
> herd that culling cows at the age
> of six or even worse at an AVERAGE
> age of six) has to do with profit,
> is inversely proportionate. That
> isn't the most ridiculus statement
> I have read on this board but it
> is a close second.

John S. --- glad you posted your response. I was thinking along those same lines myself. Plenty of good productive life left in cattle 6 years of age or older. If their teeth are good and they breed back on time and raise a good calf they have a place on my humble spread regardless of age. A high percentage of mine are eight years old and going strong. Of course, mine all have about 50% Brahman influence and that helps from the standpoint of productive longevity. (I'm sure a couple of our fellow posters would contend that I'm an idiot for having anything but 100% Angus!!) It sure is nice to have a pasture full of tried and true older gals rather than having to worry about heifers, second calf "heifers", etc. Not to mention the freight in/freight out costs, fees, etc. associated with culling at an "early" age, and having to buy replacements for considerably more $$ than you get for the middle-aged gals.
 
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Anonymous

> Thanks for all the replies...I was asking because our 10 y/o Charlois in seemingly perfect health was found dead about 24 hours after giving birth to her 9th calf. Just looking for answers and was wondering if it could be just age. We have a very small herd who are well taken care of, more like pets. Thanks again.

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Anonymous

Arnold, The most overlooked protit generator in cattle production is the "return on the asset", meaning the return to each and every production unit (cow).

In financial terms, if you don't have to replace the production asset as often, you will increase your bottom line a whole lot. Those "old" cows don't owe you a thing, they are your profit generators. The young cows that don't produce are the drain on your assets.. Great to hear from someone who undersands that!!
 
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Anonymous

I think you missed the point! That's not the way it is. I know people that won't buy a cow unless she is 4 or 5 years old. She is experienced and will make you money, but not if you sell her at 6 years old ...

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Anonymous

> The only thing (in a commercial
> herd that culling cows at the age
> of six or even worse at an AVERAGE
> age of six) has to do with profit,
> is inversely proportionate. That
> isn't the most ridiculus statement
> I have read on this board but it
> is a close second. ~~~~~~~what does "inversely proportionate" mean?~~~~~Tc
 
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Anonymous

Some of this will be a repeat of what’s been said, but put in a different way... When making decisions to cull a production herd, age is a secondary factor. Primary factors would be performance, disposition and condition.

Performance: Is she a good momma? Does she raise a good calf? Does she breed back quickly?

Disposition: Is she gentle, or is she crazy? Nobody has time for a fool cow that spooks, stirs up the others, won’t run with the herd, is always pawing the earth and hooking.

Condition: How are her teeth? Any limp? Breathing OK? Is she fat? Not gobby fat, but sleek.

NOW is the time to cull based on condition. If a cow doesn’t look good this time of year she will never look good. A correlation between age and condition could be drawn, but age should not be used for decision making. Of course, if a cow is really getting up there in years it’s obvious that each year you keep her carries more risk.

ANYTIME is the time to cull based on performance and disposition.

Craig-TX
 
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Anonymous

I don't cull a cow automatically when she reaches six no one does everyone here is missing the point. After culling normally if you went to any herd the average age of cow is going to stay in the herd only 6 years. Of course this can only be if you cull rigorously. In no way shape or form am I saying that you should cull a cow just becasue she turns 6.
 
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Anonymous

Right now is when cows around here look their worst. Feeding 3-4 month old calf, hot & humid, fescue, lower nutritional quality in the grass they do eat, having to cover more ground for pound of feed.

dun

> Some of this will be a repeat of
> what’s been said, but put in a
> different way... When making
> decisions to cull a production
> herd, age is a secondary factor.
> Primary factors would be
> performance, disposition and
> condition.

> Performance: Is she a good momma?
> Does she raise a good calf? Does
> she breed back quickly?

> Disposition: Is she gentle, or is
> she crazy? Nobody has time for a
> fool cow that spooks, stirs up the
> others, won’t run with the herd,
> is always pawing the earth and
> hooking.

> Condition: How are her teeth? Any
> limp? Breathing OK? Is she fat?
> Not gobby fat, but sleek.

> NOW is the time to cull based on
> condition. If a cow doesn’t look
> good this time of year she will
> never look good. A correlation
> between age and condition could be
> drawn, but age should not be used
> for decision making. Of course, if
> a cow is really getting up there
> in years it’s obvious that each
> year you keep her carries more
> risk.

> ANYTIME is the time to cull based
> on performance and disposition.

> Craig-TX
 
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Anonymous

There are number of seedstock herds that sell every cow that is x years old. Some it's 5, some it's 6 some it's 7 I guess they figure they;re alwasy staying up with the latest in demand genetics.

dun

> I don't cull a cow automatically
> when she reaches six no one does
> everyone here is missing the
> point. After culling normally if
> you went to any herd the average
> age of cow is going to stay in the
> herd only 6 years. Of course this
> can only be if you cull
> rigorously. In no way shape or
> form am I saying that you should
> cull a cow just becasue she turns
> 6.
 
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Anonymous

> There are number of seedstock
> herds that sell every cow that is
> x years old. Some it's 5, some
> it's 6 some it's 7 I guess they
> figure they;re alwasy staying up
> with the latest in demand
> genetics.

That is part of it, the other part is that when a buyer knows he is getting a chance at cows that are being sold just because they reached the age of 6 he is willing to pay more that he will pay for "cull cows". Once you have done it a few years people know you are selling good young cows, not culls.



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