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Adjusted weights

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dun

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I've never really paid attention to adjusted WW in our calves. We have a weaning weight requirement that if not met the calf goes to the salebarn and the cow gets one more chance.
For the first time I used the application in our managment sofware that calculates adjusted WW. What an eye opener. The calves ranged from 166 to 203 days of age at weaning. The youngest calf was under 500 lbs at weaning, normally a dumper. Her adjusted WW is 612. The heifer that I've posted the pictures of has an adjusted WW of 682. The interesting part is that there is 300 lbs difference in weights of the dams. Also the 682 adjusted heifer is from a comming 5 year old cow and the 612 is out of a coming 3 heifer.
It really has allowed me to better determine who is doing their job. Nobody else may, but I sure found it interesting.

dun
 

Frankie

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dun":1xyz0z75 said:
I've never really paid attention to adjusted WW in our calves. We have a weaning weight requirement that if not met the calf goes to the salebarn and the cow gets one more chance.
For the first time I used the application in our managment sofware that calculates adjusted WW. What an eye opener. The calves ranged from 166 to 203 days of age at weaning. The youngest calf was under 500 lbs at weaning, normally a dumper. Her adjusted WW is 612. The heifer that I've posted the pictures of has an adjusted WW of 682. The interesting part is that there is 300 lbs difference in weights of the dams. Also the 682 adjusted heifer is from a comming 5 year old cow and the 612 is out of a coming 3 heifer.
It really has allowed me to better determine who is doing their job. Nobody else may, but I sure found it interesting.

dun

Thanks for the info, Dun. Adjusting those weights to a common endpoint can make a difference. When I look at our oldest calf and youngest calf, there's considerable difference (born from Jan 2 to Feb 28th), but when we adjust those weights, there's not much difference. Now there's a lot of difference in the next to the youngest one. He's just not much punkin', I'm afraid. But we'll send him to test and see. We've been surprised before. And someone has to have the low bull on test :oops: :oops: Might be us this time.
 

greenwillowherefords

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There are also adjustments for the age of the dam. They add about 50 to the calf of a first-calf heifer that calves at 2.
 
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dun

dun

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I'm not sure if the only adjust for day of age or also for age of dam. But it sure gives a much clearer picture.

dun
 

greenwillowherefords

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dun":2ck0cp33 said:
I'm not sure if the only adjust for day of age or also for age of dam. But it sure gives a much clearer picture.

dun
I know for a fact the Hereford folks adjust for age of dam.
 

TheBullLady

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That's an interesting concept.. the age of the dam. Simmental EPD's don't consider it either. Hmmmm....
 

greenwillowherefords

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TheBullLady":2hkxzlks said:
That's an interesting concept.. the age of the dam. Simmental EPD's don't consider it either. Hmmmm....
It takes into consideration the fact that a two year old heifer is not yet at her peak capacity milking, and allows you to compare her calf more accurately with mature cows that are say 5 years old. They also have adjustment for cows over about 10 or 12.
 

PATB

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The angus association adjust for age of calf and age of dam. One must be careful on the formula used to adjust for the age since the old BIF one was biased to younger calves. I know the CHAPS 2000 program has not moved to the new formula but uses the old linear one. We have been weighing the calves for 16 years now and it helps in selecting which cattle to keep. We have

Dun another enlightening thing is to weigh the calves the day they are weaned and then when you revacinated 2 to 3 weeks later. You will be amazed at how well some of the calfs will gain, this helps identify cows that are not producing enough milk for the calf to reach his genetic growth potential.
 
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dun

dun

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PATB":9dfbi0z3 said:
Dun another enlightening thing is to weigh the calves the day they are weaned and then when you revacinated 2 to 3 weeks later. You will be amazed at how well some of the calfs will gain, this helps identify cows that are not producing enough milk for the calf to reach his genetic growth potential.

We did that last year. One calf lost weight something awful. He was alwasy the last one to the feed, and if he got jostled in anyway, he just walked away. A neighbor bought him cheap and put him by himself on silage. Grew great and slaughtered well.

dun
 

ollie

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There are other things to consider if the lighter actual weight heifer has a higher adj. ww than her heavier sister. Why did her mother calve later for example. One other thing is I have never got a cent out of an adjusted pound.
 
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dun

dun

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ollie":3tutugsn said:
There are other things to consider if the lighter actual weight heifer has a higher adj. ww than her heavier sister. Why did her mother calve later for example. One other thing is I have never got a cent out of an adjusted pound.

When we breed only on natural heats and we have a seet start date for breeding, if a heifer comes in before then she doesn't get bred till her next heat, if she comes in that day or after she gets bred on that heat.

I agrre that you don't get paid for adjusted weights. But it's a good way to see what the potential is. If two calves wean at the same weight but there's 20 days different in age you'll no either which cow is cheating, which bull doesn't have it, or which matings don't work.
It's strictly a managment tool.

dun
 

DRB

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I think I asked this before but, what software are you using that accounts for adjusted weights? It's close enough to Christmas to start asking Mrs. Santa for cow things...
 

txag

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DRB":jmrd4myr said:
I think I asked this before but, what software are you using that accounts for adjusted weights? It's close enough to Christmas to start asking Mrs. Santa for cow things...

we get our adjusted weights from AHA but the CattleMax program will adjust weights.
 
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dun

dun

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DRB":2uuzm25y said:
I think I asked this before but, what software are you using that accounts for adjusted weights? It's close enough to Christmas to start asking Mrs. Santa for cow things...

We use Cattlemax. I heard back from them and they use the BIF standard for calculating adjusted weights. It takes into consideration, age of dam, calf age ad weaning, time of year, etc.

dun
 

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