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Wagyu f1 using black angus

Khuckabee

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Anyone have any experience with wagyu??. I currently have a few decent registered angus. We are planning on AI use of wagyu semen to get maybe a dozen f1 angus/wagyu using wagyu semen and commercial angus We may use surrogates and try some full blood embryos also. Anyone have any experience bad or good with wagyu??
 

Son of Butch

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Only have a few Wagyu. 2 steers 1 hols x wagyu [he was delicious] and 1 simmi x waygu steer soon to butcher
1 hols x wagyu cow a good mother, good feet, udder and temperament, I like her and her wagyu daughter bred to wagyu for her 1st calf in spring
1 wagyu x simmi heifer to breed [to wagyu] next summer - bw 72 lbs and 555 lbs at 188 day weaning from a very good black simmi cow, no creep feed but access to high quality hay late in the season along with her mother, she was sired by Takamichi Doi http://www.baywagyu.com/AboutOurHerd-TakamichiDoi.html
1 wagyu steer calf from f1 angus x hereford for butcher next year - bw 71 lbs not weighed at weaning
I started with low expectations for growth and have been pleasantly surprised, but they sure could use more butt.
 

wbvs58

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A lot of people are looking at getting into them in Australia. The F1's with Angus are bringing about double the money. Mostly sold direct to feedlots or through Auctionsplus our online sales format. Seems like they can't get enough of them but like most things by the time most people get into them the shine will be off them. It is always the farmer that is doing things contrary to the rest that seems to get the premiums.

Ken
 

Lucky_P

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I've toyed with the idea of breeding some SimAngus, AngusXShorthorn (and now have a few BraunviehXAngus heifers coming along) cows in my herd - all selectively bred for above-average marbling/ribeye - to Wagyu sires. But... I suspect it would be less financially-rewarding for me than using a good 'growth' bull of almost any beef breed.

My impression is that the Wagyu are slow-growing, and you'd better have a niche market or direct to consumer marketing plan that's going to command a significant premium for those halfblood Wagyu calves; marketing them through the local salebarn isn't going to reward you for the potential carcass quality - in fact, you may take a hit; if you look at most of the Wagyu bulls... they look kinda like a dairy bull - noassatall - but I've never seen halfblood calves - they may be super!
 

Backbone Ranch

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What are you planning to achieve by breeding to Wagyu? I'm sure that there are exceptions, but from what I have seen of them online, they have poor back ends and many of them lack the capacity needed to do well on a forage-based diet. If it is carcass traits that you are after, there are other breeds that will give you that without having to sacrifice phenotype.
 

Commercialfarmer

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Son of Butch":3mo1g1jb said:
Only have a few Wagyu. 2 steers 1 hols x wagyu [he was delicious] and 1 simmi x waygu steer soon to butcher
1 hols x wagyu cow a good mother, good feet, udder and temperament, I like her and her wagyu daughter bred to wagyu for her 1st calf in spring
1 wagyu x simmi heifer to breed [to wagyu] next summer - bw 72 lbs and 555 lbs at 188 day weaning from a very good black simmi cow, no creep feed but access to high quality hay late in the season along with her mother, she was sired by Takamichi Doi http://www.baywagyu.com/AboutOurHerd-TakamichiDoi.html
1 wagyu steer calf from f1 angus x hereford for butcher next year - bw 71 lbs not weighed at weaning
I started with low expectations for growth and have been pleasantly surprised, but they sure could use more butt.

How did you feed them out? How old were they when you harvested them?
 

Son of Butch

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Lucky_P":4fse63ng said:
I've toyed with the idea of breeding some SimAngus, AngusXShorthorn (and now have a few BraunviehXAngus heifers coming along) cows in my herd - all selectively bred for above-average marbling/ribeye - to Wagyu sires. But... I suspect it would be less financially-rewarding for me than using a good 'growth' bull of almost any beef breed.

My impression is that the Wagyu are slow-growing,
Yup

and you'd better have a niche market
Yup
or direct to consumer marketing plan that's going to command a significant premium for those halfblood Wagyu calves;
Yup
marketing them through the local salebarn isn't going to reward you for the potential carcass quality
Yup
- in fact, you may take a hit;
Yup
if you look at most of the Wagyu bulls... they look kinda like a dairy bull - noassatall
Yup
- but I've never seen halfblood calves - they may be super!
Nope
 

Khuckabee

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We are hoping to pick up the marbling traits from the wagyu, and overcome the lack of a rear by our angus that are big in that area. There are a number of issues like taking a long time to feed we will just have to see about. I have an extremely fast maturing line of angus, we hope can combat some of that. We hope that will help. We are gonna run a low cost, low number of cattle to try it out on. I don't know about pricing. If we can get 25% more or better , it may work out and be worthwhile. We sell our cattle private treaty , so that may give us a chance to get better pricing. Sounds like the consensus experience is what we are expecting, and what we are trying to overcome up front. If it works out , we will continue and try some modifications we want to try. If not, we will eat our mistakes!!! Thanks so much for the input. We will let you know in about 18 months to 30 months how it went. I may have a good idea much quicker than that time period though. As soon as we are able to identify problems, or good. We will report. Thanks again.
 

wbvs58

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I don't know if there is a benefit in doing things halfway. Nothing wrong with the F1's with Angus but to produce that premium desirable marbling meat the cattle have to be fed by specialised feedlots for long periods of time to supply the boutique reataurant trade or for export into the Japanese market and there are a few secrets that are closely guarded along the way. In Australia there is a small chain of lotfeeders and processors that seem to know what they are doing with markets both domestically and in Japan to make solid demand for the F1's from the producer but My feeling is that this market could be easily swamped.

Ken
 

cfpinz

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I have zero first hand experience with wagyu, but have spoken with a few folks that have them. I can't help but get that "snake oil salesman" feeling afterwards.

Personally, if I don't like the looks of what I'm raising I feel no need to raise it. Most conversations regarding wagyu start off with something along the lines of: "Well they look like sh*t, but..."
 

Rafter S

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Lucky_P":19vun1aj said:
I've toyed with the idea of breeding some SimAngus, AngusXShorthorn (and now have a few BraunviehXAngus heifers coming along) cows in my herd - all selectively bred for above-average marbling/ribeye - to Wagyu sires.

Here you go: http://www.cattlerange.com/701C232-201/701C232-201.html. You could have your very own bulls. :banana:
 

backhoeboogie

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Khuckabee":3f81gvc7 said:
Anyone have any experience with wagyu??.

Front shoulder problems on crippled calves. A neighbor wound up with two and called me. Pitiful. Neighbor was not a cattleman and had no business trying to raise them. We splinted the legs and that helped.

Could be just the one line of genetics. My only experience tho was not good.
 

backhoeboogie

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"twisted legs" I suppose would sort of describe it.

ABS Genetic Defect Information

TH is a disorder of multiple congenital defects seen in calves. Translated, the name refers to absence of all or part of the tibia (tibia = the bone between the knee and ankle in humans or the stifle and hock in cattle and hemimelia = absence of all or part of a limb). But TH encompasses more defects that the name implies. TH is lethal, as the calf may be born dead, but if not dead the condition is incompatible with life. These valves have large abdominal hernias (weakening of the abdominal muscles that allows intestinal contents to bulge out), twisted legs sometimes with absent or deformed bones.
 

Lazy M

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I think that I'd quit raising cattle before I owned those sorry things
 

Boot Jack Bulls

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backhoeboogie":vehe5rwn said:
"twisted legs" I suppose would sort of describe it.

ABS Genetic Defect Information

TH is a disorder of multiple congenital defects seen in calves. Translated, the name refers to absence of all or part of the tibia (tibia = the bone between the knee and ankle in humans or the stifle and hock in cattle and hemimelia = absence of all or part of a limb). But TH encompasses more defects that the name implies. TH is lethal, as the calf may be born dead, but if not dead the condition is incompatible with life. These valves have large abdominal hernias (weakening of the abdominal muscles that allows intestinal contents to bulge out), twisted legs sometimes with absent or deformed bones.
Backhoe, I don't think what you experienced was TH. TH affected calves are almost always born dead, and those that are not will not be helped by splinting. The hernia mentioned is also unmistakable, their bellies look like they swallowed a basket ball. The cow is usually a casualty as well in TH positive matings. The defect is thanks to a specific bull in the shorthorn breed, an as far as I'm aware, has yet to be found in the Wagyu breed.
 

backhoeboogie

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Boot Jack Bulls":sia0c709 said:
backhoeboogie":sia0c709 said:
"twisted legs" I suppose would sort of describe it.

ABS Genetic Defect Information

TH is a disorder of multiple congenital defects seen in calves. Translated, the name refers to absence of all or part of the tibia (tibia = the bone between the knee and ankle in humans or the stifle and hock in cattle and hemimelia = absence of all or part of a limb). But TH encompasses more defects that the name implies. TH is lethal, as the calf may be born dead, but if not dead the condition is incompatible with life. These valves have large abdominal hernias (weakening of the abdominal muscles that allows intestinal contents to bulge out), twisted legs sometimes with absent or deformed bones.
Backhoe, I don't think what you experienced was TH. TH affected calves are almost always born dead, and those that are not will not be helped by splinting. The hernia mentioned is also unmistakable, their bellies look like they swallowed a basket ball. The cow is usually a casualty as well in TH positive matings. The defect is thanks to a specific bull in the shorthorn breed, an as far as I'm aware, has yet to be found in the Wagyu breed.

Nice to know. Front legs and shoulders were twisted and distorted. I think genetic because it was more than one calf.
 

Boot Jack Bulls

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backhoeboogie":7fuhvnny said:
Boot Jack Bulls":7fuhvnny said:
backhoeboogie":7fuhvnny said:
"twisted legs" I suppose would sort of describe it.

ABS Genetic Defect Information

TH is a disorder of multiple congenital defects seen in calves. Translated, the name refers to absence of all or part of the tibia (tibia = the bone between the knee and ankle in humans or the stifle and hock in cattle and hemimelia = absence of all or part of a limb). But TH encompasses more defects that the name implies. TH is lethal, as the calf may be born dead, but if not dead the condition is incompatible with life. These valves have large abdominal hernias (weakening of the abdominal muscles that allows intestinal contents to bulge out), twisted legs sometimes with absent or deformed bones.
Backhoe, I don't think what you experienced was TH. TH affected calves are almost always born dead, and those that are not will not be helped by splinting. The hernia mentioned is also unmistakable, their bellies look like they swallowed a basket ball. The cow is usually a casualty as well in TH positive matings. The defect is thanks to a specific bull in the shorthorn breed, an as far as I'm aware, has yet to be found in the Wagyu breed.

Nice to know. Front legs and shoulders were twisted and distorted. I think genetic because it was more than one calf.

Backhoe, maybe it was just a case of matings causing calves that were too big for the womb? I would wonder about the service sire.... It reminds me of a appy mare we had back in the day. She was super pretty headed and clean made for an appy foaled in the early 80's, but she was tiny too. No matter what stallion she was bred to, she always went 11 months and 1 day on gestation. Her foals were always huge, no matter the gender, and some had structure issues in the front legs that caused issues when they got into their 20s. She just did not have room for the foal she insisted she carry past term every time!
 

whitecow

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The black steers in these pictures are fullblood Wagyu. The gray and chocolate colored steers are Wagyu x Charolais F1. We have fed and harvested around 200 fullblood and F1 Wagyu over the last several years. As others have said, you can't take them to the local sale barn and make a living but there definitely is a place for them - direct marketing beef, selling to a Wagyu feeder at a premium price. They are slower growing but they eventually get there - with plenty of rear end.

I had a hard time looking at the fullbloods at first. I started by breeding our Char heifers to Wagyu bulls for the extreme calving ease. Those F1s looked like real cows. The resulting beef was the best I had ever tasted. It was so good that I bought a bunch of fullbloods. Seriously, after tasting the beef, I didn't care what they looked like - I wanted more of them. Best decision I have ever made.
 

gaurus

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cfpinz":igz0cz8b said:
Most conversations regarding wagyu start off with something along the lines of: "Well they look like sh*t, but..."

That is true, they look like crap on the outside but.... they look delicious on the inside. :cboy:


 

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