vaginal prolapse

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D.R. Cattle

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New one for me. Checked yesterday afternoon and all were safe and sound. Rode the herd this morning and found a cow with a mass hanging out the back side. At first it seemed afterbirth but watching for a minute I realized it was different. Looks like a giant roast hanging out the back side. Some old timers told me to douse it with sugar and stuff it back in and then downward. It was about the size of a volleyball. When the sugar started working it looked like a block of ice laying in the desert sand. It melted but after an hour of blood and mud I still couldn't stuff it back in. I'm gonna haul her to Okeechobee to the vet tomorrow but was kinda wondering, what happens if he can't get her back together? Calf is safe and nursing.
 

Scotty

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I would say keep the infection away. When you get a chance haul her. If it won't go back in it probly will get infected. Jsut make sure he gets it in. A good course of antibiotic. You mentioned sugar. I think I have coated it. She is going to the packers and the calf is your call. Bottle or sell.


Scotty
 

bigbull338

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the vet will shove it back in an sew her up.unless vet shots her full of meds you can sale her fast.but if he loads her you have to wait till the meds are out of her.scott
 

WORANCH

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After she is stiched up wait about 2 weeks and remove stiches . Then you can cull her at weaning time .
I don't retain heifers from any cows that prolapse.
 

stocky

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I use to have the vet with a prolapse cow, but it costs 100 or more for the call and it is very simple, unless she has gone long enough that it is too swollen and hard to put back in. Put her in a chute and you can give her a shot of painkiller in the tail bone to relax her rear end. Use dishwashing liquid in water to wash off the prolapse and lubricate it and then push it back in and you will have to twist just a little as you do it. Some are tougher than others but the pain medicine helps alot so she doesnt fight it. Then take a prolapse needle and you can thread it with breakable cat gut thread if she hasnt freshened yet or baler twine or shoe string if she has already freshened and make a circle around the opening to pull shut to keep her from throwing it out again and tie it off and cut off the excess. You can raise the calf on her and then sell her for slaughter. I dont ever cut the string out. i dont want anyone at the sale to make a mistake and taker her home---she goes for slaughter. The whole operation takes 10 minutes after she is in the chute and it isnt something that you can mess up, so there isnt a need to pay 100 to 150 for the vet. If the prolapse has been out a couple of days and is too swollen to get back in, she will die, so if the slaughter plant will take her, you can salvage something
 

Ann Bledsoe

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Hey DR

If things don't go well and you decide to ship her and the calf is still pretty small, give me a holler -- I've got a Jersey that's looking for a new foster calf.

Ann B
(Okeechobee)
 

Bobg

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I had one like that once. I used the sugar, completley coated it along with some sterile water. It shrunk slightly, but still had a heck of a time pushing it back in. Sewed it up and fed her out for the sale ring.

Bobg
 
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D.R. Cattle

D.R. Cattle

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Ann Bledsoe":1fcoumde said:
Hey DR

If things don't go well and you decide to ship her and the calf is still pretty small, give me a holler -- I've got a Jersey that's looking for a new foster calf.

Ann B
(Okeechobee)

All went well Annie. Doc Harvey made me look like a novice thats for sure. I think the trick was the shot he put in her tailhead. He shoved her back in and it was all over in 10 minutes. I had a heck of a time with her yesterday, but the Doc said she was probably pushing against me and it just won't happen without the shot. I gave him $100 for the procedure and $20 for tet and anesthetic. Well worth it since I can sell a good slaughter cow and wait to wean her calf before I do. Can't believe you moved to hurricane central. Too expensive. I'm working my way to the Carolinas.
 

Texan

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I'd agree with WO and cut the stitches out if you're going to keep her and let her raise her calf. I know some people don't, but you take a chance on ruining a good bull by not doing it.
 

Ann Bledsoe

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D.R. Cattle":2nh4c3j2 said:
Ann Bledsoe":2nh4c3j2 said:
Can't believe you moved to hurricane central. Too expensive. I'm working my way to the Carolinas.

I just don't see that it could be that much worst that living in "tornado central"! Or "blizzard central"!!
At least there is warning before a hurricane, a Nebraska tornado is on top of you with no more then a few minutes warning. We lived 2 miles from the debris path left by the tornado that removed Hallam, Nebraska from the face of the earth (F4 -- winds well over 200 mph). We sustained some damage from that one, it lifted a train off of the tracks and set it down in a field, turned the grain elevator into big crushed can, there was only 1 house left standing and it's interior was sucked out through the windows.

Nebraska routinely gets tropical (and even hurricane) force winds. April 2001 we lost part of the roof to our barn in 100 mph winds on an otherwise clear and sunny day.
I actually get a chuckle out of some of the weather forecasts down here -- wind advisories for 20 mph wind, in Nebraska we call that a "light breeze"! Nebraska is so windy that in the pioneer days, people actually went "wind crazy" from listening the wind whistle all the time.

And the cold!
I definitely won't miss having to keep a sledgehammer handy to bust the 3-4 inches of ice out of water tanks after those nights that the tank heaters couldn't keep up, -30 below zero isn't uncommon.
The only way a Floridian can experience anything that compares to a Nebraska winter is to go get inside your deep freezer!
I sure won't miss dragging bales of hay through the snow! And digging out after a blizzard is isn't any picnic. But I would have to say that ice storms are the worst -- or I should probably say, the storms that lay down an inch or two of ice and then a foot or so of snow on top.
Sub-zero temps, roads closed, and no electricity -- I thing I'd prefer to take my chances down here!
Every location has it's threats -- at least down here, once you get past the hurricane season, the rest of the year is paradise and even if you're without electricity, you're not going to freeze.

The one thing I will miss is the deer hunting. We haven't found a place to hunt down here yet. But, I must admit, that sitting in a tree stand when it's sub-zero isn't a whole lot of fun -- but a nice buck on the ground does warm you up real quick!
My husband and son like alligator hunting though, they took a 9 ft 3 inch male the other night.

Ann
 
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D.R. Cattle

D.R. Cattle

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OK you convinced a 36 year native why he is here. I get a kick out of some of the weather advisories too. But then, 20 MPH does a lot to the Atlantic Ocean. Plenty of deer, just noone willing to let you hunt without capitalizing on your wish. My buddy processes deer, gators, wild game. He's got a couple of hefty lizards in the cooler right now. He likes to play a trick on me by sending me in after a cold one without telling me what is laying in the dark.
 

Ann Bledsoe

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D.R. Cattle":259an2aw said:
Plenty of deer, just noone willing to let you hunt without capitalizing on your wish.

What do you mean? They expect a portion of the kill? We have always given a portion of the kill to the landowner. Our landowner in Nebraska used to love us -- we appreciated access to their land so much that not only did we give a portion of what was killed on their land, but also a portion of whatever we homebutchered (one year they got buffalo, most years they got beef and/or deer).

If you happen to know anybody that might let us in -- we bowhunt, DH has taken 63 whitetail and I've taken 6, we take care of the property (shut gates, don't leave trash and pick up trash that might already be there) and have pulled several half-dead calves out of creeks as well as getting one wet, frozen newborn up to the barn.

Ann B
 
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D.R. Cattle

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Not a portion of your kill, a portion of your life savings. A big portion. There are wildlife management areas which are state hunting preserves and all you need is a stamp for your license to hunt, but too many yahoos and they're overhunted. Check out Florida Fish and Wildlife website for more info if you wanna give it a try. I shouldn't badmouth the management areas, I'm probably just too picky to hunt with John Q. Citizen. Private leases in Florida are outrageous to the working class pocketbook. Too many wealthy doctors and businessmen here that like it too. I've taken up offshore fishing and diving, but I guess if you add the costs, a private hunting lease might be cheaper?
 
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