trees for cover

Help Support CattleToday:

robdogtn

Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2009
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Well, I dozed off all fence rows that have grow up over the last 40 yrs. Everything looks great.... Except, now I realized while cleaning up and looking good, I don't have much left in way of cover for cattle and horses. I have 2 or 3 trees and they bunch up like they are glued together.

I need to plant some trees for shelter and wanted ideas for type and I would say quick growth. I seen a guy about 40 miles from here who did some pine trees probably 20 yrs ago that makes a great cover and he strategically planted them to cover a corner of several pastures. I am in same spot. I have a blank canvas and can do what ever.

Any suggestions? I am in middle TN.
 

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
0
Location
South Georgia
Being totally practical about it I don't think you can beat a river birch if you have them along your streams or river bottoms. Here they grow in deep sands along our rivers and in the winter months you can hook a chaing to them and snatch them out and plant relocate them to your place with good success. BTW - this sized tree would give you instant shade and if you had to purchase them at the size I'm referring to they would go for about $150 apiece wholesale. They are fast growing too.

Another tree I've been considering for pastures is the chinese pistache tree. It is a rather short tree but has a wonderful mushroom shaped crown that could offer lots of shade. I'm not aware if they are poisonous to catte or not. Haven't found anything as yet but haven't studied them in any great depth.
 

grannysoo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Messages
4,813
Reaction score
0
Location
The Briar Patch
Pine trees are fine when they have matured, however for the first "several years", the cows can and will ride them down and eat the needles. That ain't good...
 

Douglas

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
885
Reaction score
4
Location
Central North Carolina
grannysoo,

I have always notice my cows tend not to eat grass with pine needles in it. For this reason i have avoided pine trees around my place. Have you seen this?
 

grannysoo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Messages
4,813
Reaction score
0
Location
The Briar Patch
Douglas":2d908vqu said:
grannysoo,

I have always notice my cows tend not to eat grass with pine needles in it. For this reason i have avoided pine trees around my place. Have you seen this?

Cows are pretty smart when it comes to grazing. Pretty much, they won't eat pine needles unless there is nothing else left to eat, then they will eat them. On the other hand, you always have that one retarded cow that is looking for a way to die....
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,664
Reaction score
198
Location
Heart of Texas
Douglas":2c0uegju said:
grannysoo,

I have always notice my cows tend not to eat grass with pine needles in it. For this reason i have avoided pine trees around my place. Have you seen this?

Not to worry.....never saw much grass grow under a pine tree anyway....
 

grannysoo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Messages
4,813
Reaction score
0
Location
The Briar Patch
TexasBred":ezq3jhjg said:
Douglas":ezq3jhjg said:
grannysoo,

I have always notice my cows tend not to eat grass with pine needles in it. For this reason i have avoided pine trees around my place. Have you seen this?

Not to worry.....never saw much grass grow under a pine tree anyway....

I've got a field that we planted pines in several years ago that is loaded with grass. In a few more years, I'll be fencing this and running cows in it. There is a lot of good stuff in the woods that the cows will eat.
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,664
Reaction score
198
Location
Heart of Texas
grannysoo":2sui6gw2 said:
TexasBred":2sui6gw2 said:
Douglas":2sui6gw2 said:
grannysoo,

I have always notice my cows tend not to eat grass with pine needles in it. For this reason i have avoided pine trees around my place. Have you seen this?

Not to worry.....never saw much grass grow under a pine tree anyway....

I've got a field that we planted pines in several years ago that is loaded with grass. In a few more years, I'll be fencing this and running cows in it. There is a lot of good stuff in the woods that the cows will eat.

Granny when I lived in East Texas nothing but a few bushes would grow under pines. Some "virgin timber" had nothing under it but a 6" mat of pine needles....I hate the things but guess they are necessary evils.
 

CattleHand

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2007
Messages
669
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
If you are going for a wind break you could always use tin or something. Dont have to use trees if waiting for them to grow doesnt work out for you.
 

grannysoo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Messages
4,813
Reaction score
0
Location
The Briar Patch
CattleHand":283grehk said:
If you are going for a wind break you could always use tin or something. Dont have to use trees if waiting for them to grow doesnt work out for you.

And if you're wanting them for a wind break, you sure don't want pine trees!
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
I don't know of any tree that can handle a lot of ground tromping around it. The toughest tree is a old prairie cottonwood.
 

angie1

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
4,179
Reaction score
0
Location
minnesota
mnmtranching":3db3pmz3 said:
The toughest tree is a old prairie cottonwood.
I was going to suggest this as well, but wasn't sure that they grew down there.

Was also thinking about box elder trees (?). I have always been partial to box elder trees.
 

john250

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Messages
8,301
Reaction score
0
Location
Holton, IN elevation 768 ft
angie":3puystzd said:
mnmtranching":3puystzd said:
The toughest tree is a old prairie cottonwood.
I was going to suggest this as well, but wasn't sure that they grew down there.

Was also thinking about box elder trees (?). I have always been partial to box elder trees.

Box Elder is a trash tree, always shedding limbs. I eliminate them when I find them. They do grow fast, however.
 

Running Arrow Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
3,439
Reaction score
2
Location
Texas Panhandle On US 83
As a former Landscaping contractor (among other vices), there are several fast-growing trees that can provide a windbreak or shade. Bear in mind that fastest growing-trees usually have a shorter life (~ 10 to 30 years; some are much longer lived as long as they are not damaged and/or don't have enough water). A lot depends on one's soil type AND the amount of water you can consistently apply from planting to establishment (usually 2 to 5 years):

  • Silver Maple
    River Birch
    Paper Birch
    Cottonwood (use "cottonless" variety)
    Green Ash
    Populus species (Cottonwood, aspen, poplar, etc.)
    Eleagnus (large shrub that is related to Russian Olive)
    Red Tip Photinia (large shrub)
    Arizona Cypress
    Fruitless Mulberry
    And, others I can't remember now

A Caveat: Anytime new trees are planted in an area where livestock are located one MUST have a fence around them (or livestock otherwise fenced out of the area) until the trees are sturdy enough to withstand livestock running into them, rubbing against them, etc. Otherwise, they can and will trash out and kill the trees without reservation...I know...I've been there!

If you have time to spare, the various species of Cedar (juniperus) make an excellent low level windbreak (usually under 8 to 10 feet tall). But, they are slow growing.

Also remember that fast growing (soft wood) trees have an aggressive root system and you should keep them significantly away from water, electric, and sewer lines...probably a minimum of 25 feet.

I have no idea as to the "safety" of livestock eating any of the above varieties. Always consult your State Dept of Agric or literature from Extension Office and/or from list of poisonous plants.
 

angie1

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
4,179
Reaction score
0
Location
minnesota
john250":3iwt211f said:
angie":3iwt211f said:
I have always been partial to box elder trees.

Box Elder is a trash tree, always shedding limbs. I eliminate them when I find them. They do grow fast, however.
Maybe that is so, but I do not remember that. We had them on the farm I grew up on on the fence line, and my dad never had a problem with them. I remember them having low, large branches so they were perfect for climbing and tree forts ~ which is why I am partial to them. Maybe cows in TN don't spend so much time in these endeavors though..........

OK~ back to cottonwoods. :nod:
 

hillsdown

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Messages
9,930
Reaction score
9
Location
Alberta, Canada
We have the opposite problem ,we desperately need to go in and clear the quarters of the poplars to get more pasture.

Our driveway is lined with willows and some other tree whose name escapes me ,but I would love to have a row on each side of ponderosa pines..Or that beautiful purple/pink leafed tree that you see in the yards of most new city lots now (anyone know the name of it?).. I wonder how much each of those trees would cost..

I do know that having trees on the fence line is always a pain in the @ss because if you have trees you will have fell and thus a torn fence and clean up.
 

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
0
Location
South Georgia
hillsdown":3p393o03 said:
Or that beautiful purple/pink leafed tree that you see in the yards of most new city lots now (anyone know the name of it?)..

I'm going to take a guess and say either schwedler maple or a norway maple. Course it could just be a purlple leaf plum. Either way, we got three of them out of the way.
 

Fred

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2004
Messages
562
Reaction score
4
Location
Louisiana
Red cedars are fast growing and make good shade. Tulip poplar is another good tree (state tree of Tennessee) Jo, the Chinese Pistashe is supposed to be a very nice tree,fast growing, pest free. A city north of me, Deridder, promotes it and encourage people to plant it around the town. My tree book shows it only growing well along the Gulf Coast including Florida and barely into Georgia and Southeast Georgia.
 

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
0
Location
South Georgia
Fred":20sdc2kw said:
Red cedars are fast growing and make good shade. Tulip poplar is another good tree (state tree of Tennessee) Jo, the Chinese Pistashe is supposed to be a very nice tree,fast growing, pest free. A city north of me, Deridder, promotes it and encourage people to plant it around the town. My tree book shows it only growing well along the Gulf Coast including Florida and barely into Georgia and Southeast Georgia.

I recently did a little reading on and learned that in some areas they can get to 50' in height. I've never seen one here over 30 feet tall. The limited height, the large mushroom spread of the crown along with its ability to withstand harsh soil conditions seems like it would make it a good pasture tree for shade. I'd like to have some but it would be hard for me to make myself pay for some when I can snatch all the river birch out of the sand for free.

Selecting the right tree is really a tough question.
 

peg4x4

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2006
Messages
3,826
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
Put up tin shade sheds--plant trees next to them so that the cows can't trample them-by the time the trees are big enough for shade,it'll be time to tear the sheds down.. also,string a wire that the birds can sit on...soon there'll be all kinds of trees growing under it.
 

Latest posts

Top