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time from exposure to symptoms

angus9259

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I'm going to try to separate my ringworm cows - symptomatic from asymptomatic to keep it from spreading. The conern is, are the asymptomatic cows contagious even though they look unaffected? How long should I quarantine them before running with the rest of my known unaffected cows?
 

LoveMoo11

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I would quarantine them, but not with the obviously affected cows. If nothing shows up within two weeks, I would say they are fine.
 

redcowsrule33

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Incubation period is between one and four weeks depending on the species of ringworm you are dealing with.
 

CKC1586

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Well I have been trying to remember when I noticed the first spot....came home from Louisville Nov 19 and I believe it was mid to late December when they "broke out". This outbreak has been hard to get a handle on. I thought I had it whipped and then noticed a new spot on the little bull's leg last week. So this has been going on for a while! Rotten stuff. :mad:
 

angus9259

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CKC1586":1ukw3mhx said:
Well I have been trying to remember when I noticed the first spot....came home from Louisville Nov 19 and I believe it was mid to late December when they "broke out". This outbreak has been hard to get a handle on. I thought I had it whipped and then noticed a new spot on the little bull's leg last week. So this has been going on for a while! Rotten stuff. :mad:

On the advise of our MSU ag extention agent, my vet, and the link I've posted below, I've actually decided against any treatments. Trying to get it under control seems to be like trying to herd cats. Like chicken pox, once they get it, they won't get it again so it's almost better to let them get it as calves. I've run through so many other scenarios and they all seem like they simply won't ultimately prevent the unaffected animals from ultimately coming in contact with it. Regrettably it's on my farm now. :cry2: Anything I sell or take to show I will make sure has been treated so as not to affect any others, but for me, it is what it is.


Here's the link if you want it.

http://www.vermontbeefproducers.org/New ... r%2004.pdf
 

CKC1586

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Thanks for the link. Good information. Only thing that they stated that I have found contrary to what they said is that once they get it they won't get it again. I have had them repeat the performance...(my luck, kinda like my root canal that went bad....only happens to 3% of the root canals) but this outbreak really has me ticked because I know how nasty it is and I let my guard down. Won't do that again, they will get bathed at each show with the antifungal soap without exception.
 

angus9259

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CKC1586":3cezzz27 said:
Only thing that they stated that I have found contrary to what they said is that once they get it they won't get it again. I have had them repeat the performance...this outbreak really has me ticked because I know how nasty it is and I let my guard down. Won't do that again, they will get bathed at each show with the antifungal soap without exception.

That was the new piece of info from the MSU extention agent too - once they have it they won't (typically) get it again. That's why, like chicken pox, it's typically a calfhood issue. But I'm with you. I let my guard down. Anything coming into our out of my place will be bathed and fungal free. No more using other peoples stuff either - including trailers.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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We actually brought ringworm onto our farm by purchasing a tractor from a dairy. Since our herd had not had it previously - everything ended up breaking out with it - cows included.
I also say to let them get it now. When you say the same animal has gotten it a 2nd time, do you mean a new spot withing ? a month? of the first one that healed?? They can keep breaking out for a long time, but once they quit (could be months - but not normally more than a month), they should not EVER get it again. Like people, there is ALWAYS an exception to the rule - but should be rare.
 

CKC1586

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":307xwlli said:
We actually brought ringworm onto our farm by purchasing a tractor from a dairy. Since our herd had not had it previously - everything ended up breaking out with it - cows included.
I also say to let them get it now. When you say the same animal has gotten it a 2nd time, do you mean a new spot withing ? a month? of the first one that healed?? They can keep breaking out for a long time, but once they quit (could be months - but not normally more than a month), they should not EVER get it again. Like people, there is ALWAYS an exception to the rule - but should be rare.
Yup, I have a cow that had it bad as a calf (NAILE 2005) and she broke out again this year but not near as bad as she had it before just a few spots and these went away relatively quick. Also have seen two of my brothers bulls end up with more than one break out, but that was in the same year as the initial break out. When we brought this home in 2005 it ended up going thru a bunch of my brothers cows, what a mess. I have gone thru gallons and gallons of bleach, bottles and bottles of anti-fungal spray and shampoo and tubes and tubes of cream that I use on their faces. I have cleaned barn walls, feed pans, halters and leads and then this year let my guard down and..... lesson learned.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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But, why worry about it???
Unless you show cattle, let it run it's course. I show cattle & do treat any affected show animals (of course!) BUT, I ignore the cattle out in the pastures. Let them get it & let them build their immunities to it.
 

CKC1586

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":d9ufim9r said:
But, why worry about it???
Unless you show cattle, let it run it's course. I show cattle & do treat any affected show animals (of course!) BUT, I ignore the cattle out in the pastures. Let them get it & let them build their immunities to it.
These were the cattle that we show that I was treating. Didn't mess with the pasture cows. Did clean the barn to hopefully curtail additional outbreaks.
 

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