Spray lime

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Bigfoot

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Heading out in the morning to get some spray lime. Some say it works, some say it doesn't, I'm going to pull some soil samples and see over time. My place needs the PH raised something awful. The way they're doing lime here at home, it's just not for me. You can't even get the equipment in off the road, much less around my pastures.

It's kinda spendy per acre, when you only get 35 gallons. In a tote, it's down there with lime/spreading. "If" it works, this fall, or next spring, I will be getting a tote (does 100 acres).
 
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Bigfoot

Bigfoot

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We are gonna try some on corn ground, hay, as well as pasture this year. Where are you getting your's Bigfoot?
Gallatin Tn. I know that doesn't tell ya what you need to know, but thats all the details I really know. The opinions and literature etc. on all of it is so confusing, I'm just gonna throw some money at it and find out for myself.
 

hillbilly beef man

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Good luck. I tested 5 gallons on a strip 35 ft wide and about 300 ft long that was covered in sage grass. I could have peed on it and done as much good. There was no difference in sage grass where I had sprayed. If a tote is $3200 I would seriously consider a Sides spreader for wet ag lime. Last I had priced one of them they were $4,800. Ag lime here is $19 ton delivered.
 

Banjo

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Heading out in the morning to get some spray lime. Some say it works, some say it doesn't, I'm going to pull some soil samples and see over time. My place needs the PH raised something awful. The way they're doing lime here at home, it's just not for me. You can't even get the equipment in off the road, much less around my pastures.

It's kinda spendy per acre, when you only get 35 gallons. In a tote, it's down there with lime/spreading. "If" it works, this fall, or next spring, I will be getting a tote (does 100 acres).
What is your Ph?
 
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Bigfoot

Bigfoot

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Good luck. I tested 5 gallons on a strip 35 ft wide and about 300 ft long that was covered in sage grass. I could have peed on it and done as much good. There was no difference in sage grass where I had sprayed. If a tote is $3200 I would seriously consider a Sides spreader for wet ag lime. Last I had priced one of them they were $4,800. Ag lime here is $19 ton delivered.
That's disappointing to read. I'm not so sure that sage would die in one year. You sprayed the pure product?
 

JParrott

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Everything I've ever read about applying lime in any other method besides dry spreading has cost more and doesn't have the increase in effectivity to offset that cost.

Traditional wet lime has to apply twice as much to get the same amount of actual effective neutralizing material and it doesn't increase reaction rates - only reduces the time it gets absorbed into the soil.

The junk peddled by the liquid calcium con artists for soil ph action is an outright lie.

What's wrong with a 6.1 ph? I prefer mine to be between 6.0-6.5. Grows legumes and grass wonderfully.
 
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BC

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Bigfoot, I don't want to rain on your parade but the liquid lime performed about like Hillbilly Beef Man's results in a result demonstration that county agents in my area conducted last year. It was only one year's data and they plan to do it again. I am attaching the results .
 

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sstterry

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Nick Wagner

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An application of calcium carbonate transformed my farm. As noted above, calcium does not adjust soil ph. Standard ag lime contains magnesium, which is much more reactive than calcium and makes your soil tight in excess. As to liquid forms, it costs money to truck water. I like mixing calcium with manure, letting it age, then spread using a manure spreader. I have also noticed increased hay yields along the highway since the state started using a calcium mixture instead of salt some years back.
 

Banjo

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An application of calcium carbonate transformed my farm. As noted above, calcium does not adjust soil ph. Standard ag lime contains magnesium, which is much more reactive than calcium and makes your soil tight in excess. As to liquid forms, it costs money to truck water. I like mixing calcium with manure, letting it age, then spread using a manure spreader. I have also noticed increased hay yields along the highway since the state started using a calcium mixture instead of salt some years back.
What does that mean.......makes your soil tight in excess? the magnesium makes your soil tight?
 

Caustic Burno

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Heading out in the morning to get some spray lime. Some say it works, some say it doesn't, I'm going to pull some soil samples and see over time. My place needs the PH raised something awful. The way they're doing lime here at home, it's just not for me. You can't even get the equipment in off the road, much less around my pastures.

It's kinda spendy per acre, when you only get 35 gallons. In a tote, it's down there with lime/spreading. "If" it works, this fall, or next spring, I will be getting a tote (does 100 acres).
It’s all about pounds of lime.
Sorry that’s just chemistry 101,
You would need a ton of Ag lime per acre here.
 

Banjo

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Sure nuff. Short answer. You need some magnesium, base saturation should be around 15% magnesium, 85% calcium.
I have noticed the last 2 or 3 years that my soil tests are showing high magnesium levels, while P and K are low to medium......could that be from feeding hi mag mineral year round for the last few years?
 

BFE

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I have noticed the last 2 or 3 years that my soil tests are showing high magnesium levels, while P and K are low to medium......could that be from feeding hi mag mineral year round for the last few years?
Possibly.
Why feed hi mag year round?
 

Nick Wagner

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I have noticed the last 2 or 3 years that my soil tests are showing high magnesium levels, while P and K are low to medium......could that be from feeding hi mag mineral year round for the last few years?
I think calcium leaches out of soil easier than magnesium. What I know is that I was told repeatedly that my farm did not need lime, but grain and forage yields both significantly increased when I applied calcium carbonate. I had two spots that grew foxtail every year, no matter what I planted. Eventually I discovered those two spots were the highest spots on the farm in magnesium.
 
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