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Several questions....

griz

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We purchased our property this past January and had several people tell me to throw a couple of black angus on the property and they would help keep the grass down etc. So, I went to an auction house and purchased two 600 lbs black angus with the purpose of butchering them this fall.

Took them home and everything went great. Four months after arriving one of the heifers dropped a calf. Well, there went that idea of butchering her! Then, about 4 weeks later the neighbors bull tore through our fencing and mounted my other heifer. So, with all of that in mind here are my questions.

1) My calf is almost weaned. I was told I could go ahead and put the mom on corn and that she would still taste excellent in 60-90 days. Is this correct?

2) I was also told to give my now pregnant heifer ludalace and then throw her on corn (she's only 3-4 weeks along).

If the above is true, how much corn per day should I give them? What about the calf? Can I throw him on corn as well (keep in mind he's about 2 weeks from full weaning)?

The big questions are how much corn and what mixture to maximize size as quickly as possible. I want out of this arrangement asap so the sooner these 3 go to butcher the better. Thanks in advance for your help!

Bob
 

Running Arrow Bill

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You didn't say how old the heifers were that you bought at sale barn. Also, another reason not to "trust" sale barn cattle unless they have been checked and/or examined by Vet (if they are breeding age).

Bull got to your other heifer: Trust the neighbor repaired your fence free!

If the just serviced heifer is not at least 12-14 months old when she was serviced by neighbor's bull, give her the Lutylase to abort her. Don't want too young heifer to have a calf. CHECK WITH YOUR VET! Please don't take my word for it.

Feeding instructions are on every bag of feed. Hay or good pasture forage probably more important than bagged feed. Provide good quality minerals and salt for sure.
 

Jake

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sell the heifer with the calf now. lot of dollars could come out of that. Just buy another heifer to put on feed that is about the same weight. your heifer now should sell better than the one you'll buy by the pound. lutalyse the remaining heifer and put her on feed. Talk to a local feed rep to see what ration is "best"
 

toby

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With the price of cows and calves today and you wanting to get rid of your heifer/cow I'd put wheels on them. Young cow/calf pair are going for >$800.00 around here. The other heifer should bring good $$ also.
 

griz

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Both heifers were under a year old when I purchased them. They are both approaching 14 months. The sale barn said that the heifer with calf would be sold as a heiferette and that the price would not be that good. I paid $.90/lb for them and the auctioneer stated that they would not bring anything near that.

Both heifers have been on good forage since April at my farm. However, I want to just fatten them up and butcher them. I just want out at this point and put some decent meat in the freezer.
 

Campground Cattle

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griz":21lbz6e0 said:
be sold as a heiferette.

I have been to the salebarn once or twice, rat killing, barn burning and a county fair. I have never heard an auctioneer refer to a heiferette. Is this a regional, city term. I have never seen this term on weekly sales reports.
 

rgv4

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I've never heard of a five month old heifer getting bred, which is how old she would have been if she is now 14 months old. I think someone was fibbing on the age of those heifers at the salebarn. You might want to get her teeth looked at to try to get some idea of her real age.

Most heifers don't have a real cycle until they are 12 months are older.

I just got the market report for this area and cattle are $2 - $4 lower this week.
 

fit2btied

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rgv4":f7wwb1fb said:
Most heifers don't have a real cycle until they are 12 months are older.

Our neighbor's bull broke in with our Simmi heifers and bred two of them when they were not quite six months old. We didn't know it at the time. One calved unassisted, the other had to be pulled. Both cows are still productive today. The Simmis and Gelbviehs we have had seem to be very early maturing, making it necessary to keep them away from all bulls, even the young ones. That's another reason we cut them as soon as possible.
 

rgv4

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Ok. Shall I say that I have never had a heifer that bred under about 13 months old.

According to the majority of research, heifers don't truly start cycling until they are 12 months old. Of course there are always exceptions to the rule.
 

kjerckie

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I met a Dexter cattle breeder earlier this year. They bought a yearling heifer and it calved a month or so after getting it home. Both mom and baby were just fine. Sure surprised the people.
 

dun

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rgv4":2nca2fm1 said:
Ok. Shall I say that I have never had a heifer that bred under about 13 months old.

According to the majority of research, heifers don't truly start cycling until they are 12 months old. Of course there are always exceptions to the rule.

We've occasionally had a heifer have a light heat before yearling. We weaned last Tuesday, all the calves range from 166 days to 202 days. Had 1 in standing heat day before yesterday and two more this morning, 2 different sire and all 3 from different cow familys. It's been a strange year.

dun
 

txshowmom

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In answer to the original question, I would sell all three and buy a couple of steers to fatten up and butcher.
 

PLR

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I agree with TXshowmom unless you want to get into breeding cattle. Sell them and get a couple of steers to fatten up. They finish better Gain better and aren't nearly the hassle of heifers.

PLR
 

sidney411

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I agree with the last 2 posts.
You could sell the bred heifer and pair and buy 2 steers and still have money left over. There have been quite a few cows (heifers) come through the sale barn lately that had a '1' stamped on their side with a calf that were open and sold quite well. If you are just looking for butcher beef then that is the way I would go.
 

Dave

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My answer to question 2, is that I would just go ahead and feed her for that 60 to 90 days and butcher her. Being only 4 months or so bred will not have any bad effect on the quality of the meat. In fact I have heard of people who actually prefer to butcher short bred heifers claim the meat is more tender? At that point not much energy has gone to the embryo. There just isn't any advantage to abort the heifer then butcher her in a couple of months.
The one with the calf.... sell the calf and put her on feed. If she is in good condition and on the gain she should be ok. I have eaten lots of heiferettes. They might not make grade but they are ok to eat.
Dave
 

greenwillowherefords

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dun":3ewtgsk3 said:
rgv4":3ewtgsk3 said:
Ok. Shall I say that I have never had a heifer that bred under about 13 months old.

According to the majority of research, heifers don't truly start cycling until they are 12 months old. Of course there are always exceptions to the rule.

We've occasionally had a heifer have a light heat before yearling. We weaned last Tuesday, all the calves range from 166 days to 202 days. Had 1 in standing heat day before yesterday and two more this morning, 2 different sire and all 3 from different cow familys. It's been a strange year.

dun
The age of a heifer's maturity is directly related to her sire's scrotal size. The better endowed the bull, the earlier his daughters will cycle. I've had several start cycling by eight months, and had to lutalyse one twice because my bull got to her once, and she got to the neighbor's bull the second time. He was a black brangus cross with more brahman than angus..... would've made a decent baldie if he'd been a good looking bull, but he wasn't, and I'm not in the cross-breeding business myself, so... Besides that this was a show heifer, and under a year old.
 
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