Saw Chain.

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OzssieDave19

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Hey Guys. Just bought a new Echo saw. Got told Stihl saw chain and files were the best. My chain is .325, 058gauge, 72 drive link, semi chisel suit 18 inch bar. Is that a Stihl type chain that I could quote those numbers at Stihl dealer and put on the echo?
 

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Dave

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Chain size is by the saw sprocket, bar tip, and the bar rails. Drive links is the length of the chain. Any brand of chain should have a chain that matches those numbers.
 

Rmc

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Part number may or may not work at your Stihl dealer. Some stihl dealers get chain from stihl in bulk and build their own chains in the back.
The info on the bottom is the info you need
 

Atimm693

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25RM3 is what you should be looking for. That is .325 .058 semi chisel. Full chisel would be 25RS3.

I've always found Stihl chains to be the hardest. They stay sharp longer but are more difficult to file. Oregon is pretty soft, Carlton used to be as well, but I bought one of their's recently and it was about as bad as Stihl.

This is the breakdown of Stihl's numbering system. Every manufacturer is different.


I've been using 8Ten chains from Ebay lately and like them. They tested pretty well on Project farm and are pretty cheap.
 

jltrent

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Stihl 18" 25RS Chainsaw Chain Loop (.325 x .058) 72 Drive Links, 25RS72


For the money theses are hard to beat.......They cut good, but might be just a little softer than the Stihl as

Atimm693 mentioned about, but easier to sharpen if you use a file. You can almost buy 2 for the price of one Stihl and they are good quality chains.​


 
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Atimm693

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You can't beat a file IMO. I have a grinder but don't use it that often.

Most people don't know how to file. Sawing at it or lightly stroking the cutters won't accomplish anything. You need to grip the file fore and aft, and apply a lot of pressure in one direction. If you don't have a pile of chips laying on the vice when you're done, you aren't doing it right.
 

Dave

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I have filed and ground away miles of chain. I have had enough practice so I can make a chain really cut either way. I have a Silvey grinder. I believe they have gone out of business. But during the hay days of PNW logging it was considered the Cadillac of chain grinders. When you are getting paid by the thousand board feet that you put on the ground nothing but razor sharp will do. Also when you are cutting through logs 4 to 8 feet in diameter you need a chain that cuts straight. Cuts that wander off one way or the other just don't make it. We would go through two chains a day. Change one out mid day and put on a sharp chain a quitting time so you have a fresh chain for morning. So I took home two chains to grind every night. For someone who starts up their saw a few times a year and cuts twigs the brand of chain doesn't really matter. Just try to keep it sharp.
 

wbvs58

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I think dressing the bar regularly is important too to keep them cutting straight. How do the likes of you professionals go about dressing the bar? Dave?

Ken
 

jltrent

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I think dressing the bar regularly is important too to keep them cutting straight. How do the likes of you professionals go about dressing the bar? Dave?

Ken
Very Important. I have a flat bed sander I level the bar rails if needed and also remove any lip on the outside of the rails. Also a good ideal to clean the rails out to help with oiling and reduce chain/bar temperatures if needed.
 

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