Recent cattle deaths

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Linda K.

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We lost two cows recently. Both had no signs of any health issues. The first one we found bloated and took to the vet. He ran a hose down her throat to try to flush her but we lost her within a few hours. The most recent one was a very healthy limosine--she dropped in her tracks and was so bloated within a couple of hours of the last time she was seen and didn't even look like a cow--more like a huge pig.

We also just lost two calves and don't know the cause. The first one was about 5 months--found laid out, having convulsions and died within a few days. Then just last week we had what looked like a perfectly healthy newborn who was nursing and walking around, found laid out on the cold ground (had just been seen about 5 hours before doing fine). She was having involuntary movements --neck pulled back, legs galloping but could not get up, rapid movement of the eyes. We moved her inside and warmed her up in the evening. She continued to gallop and convulse for about 5 hours and then got still. From the neck up though she kept drawing back and eyes moving and ears and nose twitching. The next morning she started trying to nurse a bottle, became more energetic, had a severe convulsion and died.

We are losing way too many animals and can't figure out why. HELP! The local vet does not have a clue. Thanks
 

Syd Sydney

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The calf could be numerous things but the cows is another story.Did your vet do a whole work up and send it to the lab of any of them?If not that should have been done when they were clueless to what was happening.
 

SPRINGER FARMS MURRAY GRE

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First thing is to find another vet, failing in that,contact the state vet for help, or the local extension agent, or NRCS.They can help you possibly identify toxic weeds you may have in your pasture (if any are left),you may have some source of toxic waste depending where you are at,or some other source of contamination. You must not waste any time or effort or you may continue losing cattle! :shock:
 

grannysoo

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SPRINGER FARMS MURRAY GRE":9vfq0cfh said:
First thing is to find another vet, failing in that,contact the state vet for help, or the local extension agent, or NRCS.

Excellent advice! Get on it.
 

Scotty

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Don't waste time taking the cattle to the vet.

Really?

You might also want to consider moving the herd to another place until you can isolate the problem as environmental or other.[/quote]

I agree with this.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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grannysoo":tzxnban5 said:
SPRINGER FARMS MURRAY GRE":tzxnban5 said:
First thing is to find another vet, failing in that,contact the state vet for help, or the local extension agent, or NRCS.

Excellent advice! Get on it.

Agree also! Need to find a "Real" Vet...one that knows something about illness, disease, toxicology, etc...

"Sounds" like could be some type of neurotoxin causing the sudden and/or convulsive behavior. Toxic weeds? Snake bite (neurotoxin or hematoxin)? Some bada$$ virus or something out there.

Post-mortem and specimens to a State lab would be my plan if it happened to me...
 

JRM

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If no one else around you is having trouble, then it sounds like it would be something in your pasture or your feed/hay.
Check with your neighbors and see if any of them are having trouble.
Let us know what you find out
 

larryshoat

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This is a perplexing post. 4 dead catlle, drastically different ages, but symptoms too similar to ignore a connection. Are the vaccinations up to date on the cows and older calf? There is a part of me that wants to believe Earl is right about enterotoxemia. It is also common in calves fed by bucket or bottle, caused or at least made worse by irregular feeding times, but I don't know how common in calves on cows. I guess my first question would be on the 7 way vaccinations.

Larry
 

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