Newborn calf front hocks

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JJColvin

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Newborn calf’s front hocks won’t straighten out, is walking on his toes. I think I saw this addressed on here sometime in the past. Anyone know what causes this and cure or treatment?
 

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Mat Man

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If you can straight them a little each day . Another thing that helps is to make it walk and run . It will get better I have seen a few a lot worst than that one
 

wbvs58

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I think your problem is in its fetlocks JJ. If he has hocks on the front then you might need to find one with elbows on the rear and do a swap. Seriously now, most of these resolve themselves, I would confine them to small area so it doesn't have to travel long distances. They tend to be best when they first get up and as they fatigue they knuckle over more.

Ken
 

Katpau

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This is a fairly common condition, and almost always corrects itself without your needing to do anything. It happens more often with large calves and twins, but it is not real unusual to see it in an average weight calf. I assume it has something to do with the position in the womb. I also suspect there may be a genetic aspect to it. A bull I ran back in 2008-2010 sired several calves each year like that. Most of these calves will begin to show improvement in just a few days. Within 10 days to a couple weeks, almost all will be up on their feet and running with the rest of the herd. In the meantime, keep them confined somewhere where the calf has easy access to the cow. Some people put splints on them to help them stand normal. There are arguments that it helps and others that claim they would have improved without. If you put on splints I suggest you only leave them on when you are there. They can rub and cause more harm then good.
 

uplandnut

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I had a heifer do this a couple years ago. she never did clear up. Her joints were huge though, whereas your calf looks to have normal size joints. I tried taking a pool noodle cut to about 6" length and vet wrapping it on around the joint to offer some support.
 
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JJColvin

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Did u have to pull that calf?
Search contracted tendons.

Usually it straightens out on it's own. Long as it's up and moving. Some recover faster than others
Thanks guys, not a pull calf, born at night. Have done some research, agrees with everything I see posted. Calf is doing better on day 3. He’s running and has no visible wear or lesions on front of his joint.
 
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JJColvin

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I think your problem is in its fetlocks JJ. If he has hocks on the front then you might need to find one with elbows on the rear and do a swap. Seriously now, most of these resolve themselves, I would confine them to small area so it doesn't have to travel long distances. They tend to be best when they first get up and as they fatigue they knuckle over more.

Ken
Hahaha, thanks for keeping me honest about those fetlocks, my nomenclature failed! All advice appreciated and respected.
 

Vschoettle

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Newborn calf’s front hocks won’t straighten out, is walking on his toes. I think I saw this addressed on here sometime in the past. Anyone know what causes this and cure or treatment?
Your calf will probably straighten out. I'd be more concerned if it was the backend or just one limb. I've see colts do the same and they straighten out.
 

J Hoy

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Contracted tendons on newborn grazing animals is often caused by disrupted calcium metabolism during development in the womb. For some reason, the cells of the developing fetus do not uptake the needed calcium and other minerals, sometimes resulting in disrupted bone growth of the facial bones (underbite and overbite) and sometimes resulting in missing digits or parts of limbs. Mild disruption of the fetuses calcium metabolism can result in contracted tendons or weak pasterns. An electrolyte pill that was found to work quite well on wild ruminants in rehab that had such effects is called Calc. Phos. 6X or Calc. Phos. 30X. Hyland's Homeopathic Calc. Phos. is the brand that I used, but there are other brands. Health food stores usually carry these electrolyte pills. If one pill is given each morning and evening, the legs are straight within three days. The pill can be given to the mother in grain if the newborn is suckling ok. See the before and after photos of a deer fawn with the same problem at this link. https://homeopathic.com/using-homeo...-function-especially-for-animals-by-judy-hoy/
The deer fawn was completely normal in less than three days after the mother began being given the Calc. Phos. tablets on her grain. That was after no improvement in the fawn for three weeks after it was born and it was appearing to be getting worse. This fawn was a wild fawn nursing a wild mother, but the mother would eat grain that she was given, so a couple of the pills were put on the top of the grain and she ate them.

Also, the same electrolyte pill stimulates the cells to uptake needed calcium and other minerals. When given to wild or domestic ruminants born with an underbite or an overbite, it stimulates the facial bone cells to uptake needed calcium and the facial bones grow to normal in approximately 2 weeks after they are born, resulting in a normal bite. That allows a grazing animal to be able to efficiently bite off foliage, and thus gain size and weight normally. That is why I tell livestock owners to check the bite of all newborns, even though some say things like, "Who checks the bite on calves?" The obvious answer to that is anyone who wants their calves to grow normally and gain weight normally so they bring more money. If you don't want healthy calves and more money, don't check the bite on newborns. That is everyone's right, since this is a free country. Good luck with your calf.
 

Louthelivestockguy

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Newborn calf’s front hocks won’t straighten out, is walking on his toes. I think I saw this addressed on here sometime in the past. Anyone know what causes this and cure or treatment?
We had this occur on our farm when I was in high school. The vet said it was from selenium deficiency and that we should give the calf electrolytes and a calcium injection for energy and help with muscular growth. The calf lived, but in our area he would be a sitting duck if coyotes happened upon him early on before he was able to move better. He had a weird gate for 3 months after birth and his front lower legs knuckles were thicker from it!
 

Hereford2

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Give him a Shot of Bo-Se, which is Selinium and vitamin E. Helps straighten them out fast. Also my vet says splints aren't generally necessary.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Like "Dun" always said "benign neglect". Leave it alone. The tendons are tight from keeping their front legs curled (crowded womb). The more they use them, the looser the tendons will get. But as mentioned, keep mom & calf fairly confined for few days.
So, 3 days and calf is doing better - you are all set. Great that you were concerned, but you will soon learn - somethings are best left alone.
 

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