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New Cow

Ryan

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Here is a cow we were fortunate enough to be able to acquire this past week.

MK Society's Child
Saltgrass x Society Redeemer
D.O.B. 1-09-2006
She was the 2008 World Grand Champion Female
She will have her 2nd calf in April/May
She is a full sister to the young heifer we bought last December, who I have posted before, but also posted below for reference.

Let me know what you think of her. This picture was taken roughly a month ago. She has been on pasture and hay only since last July (after the World Show)



MK High Society (younger sister born 3-4-2008)


Ryan
 

KNERSIE

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Just out of curiosity... how many countries were represented in the World Championship? Is there any longhorns outside the USA and its immediate neighbours?

The cow certainly is longbodied and well made, but a little more depth would have been ideal in my non-longhorn opinion.
 

Ryan

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KNERSIE":2hmq5scw said:
Just out of curiosity... how many countries were represented in the World Championship? Is there any longhorns outside the USA and its immediate neighbours?

The cow certainly is longbodied and well made, but a little more depth would have been ideal in my non-longhorn opinion.

Exhibitors were just from the U.S. There aren't many breeders outside the U.S. really. For what its worth, her sire came out of Canada as a yearling.

I do agree with you, If I could add some more depth to her that would be great. But with her horn, frame, front-end and style we think she will work really well with the bull we plan to breed her to. I think they will compliment each other very well.

Ryan
 

bigbull338

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that is a whale of a cow.you sure did right by buying her.she will be a awsome producer.
 

Ryan

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Australian":152iu9d8 said:
Theres just a few here in Australia. not very common though. One of the better looking Longhorns that I've seen.

I would guess that Australia (or New Zealand, not sure which has more) would rank #3 in numbers of registered Texas Longhorns behind U.S. and Canada. But like you said, there aren't really that many down that way.

Thanks for the compliments on her. Besides the production value she adds to our herd, I am glad that my boss allowed us to add her to our herd. The gentleman that bred and raised her, Bob Moore, was my grandfather (step-grandfather to get technical, but I always considered him a grandpa) and he has probably raised more World Champions that anyone else in the longhorn breed (though, I'd like to think we're catching up). He consigned the dam to this cow to a sale with the black and white cow still inside her. All along he thought it was a mistake to consign her to the sale, so he decided to P.O. and take her home (she went for a pretty hefty price, too and worked something out with the person who had the highest bid). That was in November, she calved in January, in March he told me that the cow he P.O.'ed had a heifer calf at side (black cow above) that was the most beautiful calf he'd ever had born on his property and could be the best he'd ever bred. She was the pride and joy of his breeding program. He was so proud of that cow. His last World Show was this past summer, and he was so happy to see that cow win. It was great. He passed away last October, and we have been fortunate enough to add a bull and two females from his program to ours.

Ryan
 

Keren

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brilliant, as always Ryan.

Agreed she could use some depth and capacity, but geez I dont care she is N-I-C-E.

Which of your bulls will she be bred to?

Btw, I'll help boost the numbers of longhorns in Australia if you'll send me that cow ;-) or some embryos :lol2:
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Ryan, as always, I appreciate the quality of your cattle. Best muscled & "prettiest" LH I ever see.
Yeah, she could use some more depth, but, like my 3-yr olds, they're still growing & making babies. She'll be deeper in a year or two.
Real nice.
 

Ryan

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Keren":3i7q6uhr said:
brilliant, as always Ryan.

Agreed she could use some depth and capacity, but geez I dont care she is N-I-C-E.

Which of your bulls will she be bred to?

Btw, I'll help boost the numbers of longhorns in Australia if you'll send me that cow ;-) or some embryos :lol2:

First go 'round we'll probably breed her to our bull RCR Scorpion's Stinger


Not exactly sure who we are going to breed lil sister to as of yet. But once they both have their babies on the ground next year we'll use that info for the next breeding.

Jeanne, I agree. Once that baby gets a little bigger and we get some more nutrition into her, she'll fill out some. She'll never be the deepest bodied cow we own, but I think she'll be more than adequate.

Ryan
 

Bez+

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I do not know how you do it.

Every time I see your pics I am impressed.

You must be excellent at photoshopping your pics because I cannot find out where you fixed them!! :D

Or you have some pretty fine connections.

Another very nice animal.

You need to go through your herd and send us a group shot sometime.

There has to be at least one in the herd that should be culled - we all have that!!

Bring more pics my friend.

Regards

Bez+
 

Ryan

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Bez+":1xtxo9bf said:
I do not know how you do it.

Every time I see your pics I am impressed.

You must be excellent at photoshopping your pics because I cannot find out where you fixed them!! :D

Or you have some pretty fine connections.

Another very nice animal.

You need to go through your herd and send us a group shot sometime.

There has to be at least one in the herd that should be culled - we all have that!!

Bring more pics my friend.

Regards

Bez+

Thanks for the comments Bez+

We do have some that need to be culled, for one reason or another. I dont normally try to post culls, I figure that is counter-productive. However, since you asked, I will go through my pictures this evening and try and find some pictures of animals that would be serve us better if they weren't in our program anymore.

We cull very heavy at weaning. Since we show, we usually only keep back females that have done well on the show circuit as replacements. That has kind of caught up to us here recently. Only keeping back a minimal number each year and increasing our sales has caused our the average age of our cow herd to get to just over 9 years old, if I remember correctly. We've started keeping back a few more females the past couple years to help get our cow herd younger, and back to the number we would it to be.

As far as photoshop goes: I only alter the landscape (post/fence/manure/etc... removal). I will adjust brightness/contrast/colors. I might take a halter off, but usually just leave it on (actually don't take very many pictures at all with halters on). I will clean up the extra hair on the sheath of a bull. But I do not alter the physique of the animal. Although, If I were to alter the physique of an animal, I am pretty confident in my abilities that the alterations wouldnt be noticeable.

Disclaimer: I did not take either picture of the two females. I did take the picture of the bull grazing.

Ryan
 

Bez+

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Ryan":2yqeoget said:
Bez+":2yqeoget said:
I do not know how you do it.

Every time I see your pics I am impressed.

You must be excellent at photoshopping your pics because I cannot find out where you fixed them!! :D

Or you have some pretty fine connections.

Another very nice animal.

You need to go through your herd and send us a group shot sometime.

There has to be at least one in the herd that should be culled - we all have that!!

Bring more pics my friend.

Regards

Bez+

Thanks for the comments Bez+

We do have some that need to be culled, for one reason or another. I dont normally try to post culls, I figure that is counter-productive. However, since you asked, I will go through my pictures this evening and try and find some pictures of animals that would be serve us better if they weren't in our program anymore.

We cull very heavy at weaning. Since we show, we usually only keep back females that have done well on the show circuit as replacements. That has kind of caught up to us here recently. Only keeping back a minimal number each year and increasing our sales has caused our the average age of our cow herd to get to just over 9 years old, if I remember correctly. We've started keeping back a few more females the past couple years to help get our cow herd younger, and back to the number we would it to be.

As far as photoshop goes: I only alter the landscape (post/fence/manure/etc... removal). I will adjust brightness/contrast/colors. I might take a halter off, but usually just leave it on (actually don't take very many pictures at all with halters on). I will clean up the extra hair on the sheath of a bull. But I do not alter the physique of the animal. Although, If I were to alter the physique of an animal, I am pretty confident in my abilities that the alterations wouldnt be noticeable.

Disclaimer: I did not take either picture of the two females. I did take the picture of the bull grazing.

Ryan

Be advised I am not looking to see your dirty laundry - like obvious culls - what I am interested in is why some of the good looking animals you might have that go out the door - do go out the door.

What fits your program and what does not. And to me the all important - "why".

Otherwise it would be very counter productive indeed - so keep those out of the topic - job protection can be important!

As you know I have used long horns in a cross breeding program and found them to be quite a capable animal.

I also have used LH on heifers.

I am presently in the middle east - I wonder how they might do on the Israeli / Syria - Golan Heights. How tick resistant are they, how well they can scrounge, and how they are for temps in the 40 degree C range. I see a lot of bone thin cattle over here and you would not believe what they can survive on. It is green here at the moment and it is the fattening time and calving time for the cattle.

There may be a possible interest in some areas here - some of your other deep south breeds are here and they often cross with a British or small continentals. Perhaps it can get too hot here - but there does seem to be an increase in the Brit cattle over the past year on the ranges. There is a move affot at one ranch here to breed to some of the smaller Arab cattle - I wonder what / how LH might do over here.

Horns and nuts are never an issue over here as they stay on to satisfy Kosher requirements.

No attempt at hijacking - just a rambling thought or two - I happen to be hooked in to a couple of the larger ranches over here.

Got to run - off to Frankfurt tomorrow morning at 0500 - have to be there three hours ahead - after a nearly one hour and forty minute long taxi ride to Tel Aviv first. So I pack now and pull out of here at around midnight - If you get a chance to respond I will follow up - otherwise send me PM if you like - should be back on line in a day or two.

Hey, you have a good one.

Bez+
 
A

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Keren":1zkjh9qk said:
brilliant, as always Ryan.

Btw, I'll help boost the numbers of longhorns in Australia if you'll send me that cow ;-) or some embryos :lol2:

I'd be with you on that one Keren... we could start up our own little syndicate!
Come to think of it. I'm sure someone's already done that with another breed of cattle..... :p
But seriously, we could really start some sort of craze here I'm sure!
 

Ryan

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As of right now, our goal is to increase the consistency of quality produced in our herd. More better animals. Consistency is tough to find in the longhorn breed, but I think we (the industry, as well as Sand Dollar Ranch). One prime example of consistency issues is the following bull:


"When its good, its real good. When its bad, its real bad" That was the way he went, as far as production goes. He produced some fantastic animals, when the genetics hit right. But when they didn't, the culls where bad. Poor gainers, gangly looking, just plain ugly. Some had great horns, some not much at all. And that was passed on to his offspring. Even the best of his offspring have had their bouts with inconsistency. I would say that outside of the standard culling reasons for cattle already in production (i.e. age, fertility, health, etc..) consistency would be one of our main culling points is consistency. If we look at our records and realize that a cow hasn't produced a worthwhile calf in a while, there is a good chance she gets culled. She might raise a "nice, healthy" calf each year, but if that "nice, healthy" calf is at the bottom end each year, with the bulls we have, that is a direct result of the dam.

We feel we have some of, if not the, top bulls in the industry for what we are trying to do. Our two senior herdsires both have the phenotype that allowed them to be extremely successful on the show circuit. And since then they have gone on to produce extremely well. I think they compliment each other very well and should work well on each other's daughters. Although they are both very correct phenotypically and have produced very well, they do have different styles. NP Redeemer's Redemption has more frame, length and extension. I call him our "finesse" bull. Though he does not lack, by any means in muscle or performance. RCR Scorpion's Stinger is more moderate, wider-topped, and I call him our "power" bull. Again, he does exhibit some finesse.

We are trying to increase the structural correctness, increase performance (weight gain, reproduction, etc.. not horn), while maintaining the breeds longevity, hardiness, disease resistance, maternal abilities, and ease of calving. Specifically, in regards to phenotype, the number 1 thing we strive for is structural correctness, followed closely by balance. Structural correctness is a very broad topic that covers many parts of the animal, but it is of the most importance and cannot be sacrificed. Balance is something that I personally feel is one of the biggest downfalls of the longhorn breed. Too many funnel butts. Even if that is a "characteristic" of the breed, that doesn't mean it is good. Finding quality animals is important, but even more important is finding quality animals that produce quality animals. One of our ads in the past was headlined "Producing Producers". Having World Champion animals is nice, we love it, however raising World Champions that produce World Champions is even better. The most rewarding is seeing other producers thrive by using our genetics.

If we do not think an animal can help our herd, or someone elses, it goes across the scales. Many of our "culls" can still help other herds in the industry. Not saying we are better than everyone else, but other people have different goals, and can utilize different "types" of animals. We do have some animals that would be better off "down the road" but one thing I have to contend with is that the ranch I work for is my boss' hobby. So we do have some animals that will live out their lives on the ranch. No matter their production value, he has become attached to them b/c they were in the group of first animals he bought and produced with. They are what got him started.


This heifer, for example, she came from a World Champion female and had a great phenotype as a calf. As she got older she didn't necessarily "fall apart" she just ended up being a different type of animal than we expected. Her first calf was extremely subpar, even for a first calf heifer. So she ended up going across the scales.

I know I kind of rambled, but hopefully I answered some questions about our program. We strive to be the best. If animal doesn't prove it can produce, its gone. We've sent some well high-bred animals across the scales to get them out of the system. We pride ourselves on having the best bulls available, and using all information at hand to selectively breed our females to our bulls. We understand that there are others that have been around longer, and we are not the only ones that can produce top of the line animals. That is why we have not been afraid to buy from them, or utilize their genetics. Although we do not go for outside bloodlines often, when we do, we do our homework and do not take additions to our lightly.

I am more than happy to clarify anything or answer anymore questions anyone might have.

Ryan
 

Ryan

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In regards to cattle in Israel and surrounding areas. I am not that familiar with what is already there, however there was an article about some longhorns being used in Africa. The article was in the March issue of the The Texas Longhorn Journal which should be online shortly at www.thelonghornjournal.com Some semen has either already been shipped and been used, or is on its way. With embryos on the way. The semen was being used on bos indicus based females that are native to the area. I'm not sure the specifics of the whole situation, as i just skimmed through the article. The lady sending the semen and embryos has probably done more exporting of longhorn genetics than anyone else, mostly to Australia and New Zealand. Seems like it is a pretty neat deal they are doing over there in Africa. Bringing in a different gene pool, that has the traits of disease resistance and hardiness that is demanded by the region. Could be something in there that might be helpful to the Israel area.

If I can be of anymore assitance I would be more than happy to help.

Ryan
 

DOC HARRIS

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Ryan-

You are certainly following my admonition of "Breed The Best To The Best!"

What a spectacular Longhorn Female! Assuming that she satisfies your "consistency" ultimatums, I am sure that breeding her to RCR Scorpion's Stinger should produce exemplary progeny! The cattle 'tools' that you have at your disposal almost guarantee a high percentage of bovine success! :tiphat:

DOC HARRIS
 

Ryan

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DOC HARRIS":cslyh354 said:
Ryan-

You are certainly following my admonition of "Breed The Best To The Best!"

What a spectacular Longhorn Female! Assuming that she satisfies your "consistency" ultimatums, I am sure that breeding her to RCR Scorpion's Stinger should produce exemplary progeny! The cattle 'tools' that you have at your disposal almost guarantee a high percentage of bovine success! :tiphat:

DOC HARRIS

Thanks DOC. I believe she (and her little sister) will fit in to our plans for increasing consistent quality. She did a nice job on her first calf, especially with who she was bred to. We are excited to see how she produces, she a little different "flavor" than most of our cattle, but we think that will be a good thing for her, and our herd.

Ryan
 

MR3

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She's a dandy! Hope she produces matching quality for you!

Rod
 
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