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My Steer Pics and Name Suggestions

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brahma_show_girl

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I want yalls honest opinion on my two show steers please.

Sired by Heat Wave
Born in Sept.









I know in the profile veiw it looks like he breaks behind his shoulders, but he got a fungal infection and lost all his hair in between his shoulders and a little down his back. So I think it gives the appearance that he breaks behind his shoulders.


Sired by Alias and his Maternal Grand Sire is Yahtzee
Born Nov. 19th








I have had the black calf for 2 days and I haven't picked up the white calf yet. I get him next week.

Please tell me what you think. I need some help on names for both of them also.
 

Jovid

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The white calf is only 4 1/2 months old and already weaned?
 

*Cowgirl*

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Decent calves. I would def clip the 1st one a lot tighter and wider over his top. The white one is still awfully young


Ribeye and TBone
 

Cowboy 2.0

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Jovid":1torkflx said:
The white calf is only 4 1/2 months old and already weaned?

Everyone seems to be pulling them off earlier and earlier. There are alot more lightweights now days than there used to be.
 
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brahma_show_girl

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He hasn't been weaned yet. It will be the first time away from his mother when I bring him home. I'm not sure why they are doing this but I the guy said he was born November 19th and I could pick him next week or the week after next. Anymore critisism is appreciated.
 

Keren

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I'd call the little white guy Akka (aka ... alias)

And I'd call the big black guy ... this is a little different ... Calidity ... means heat

Or you could call them Snowball (black steer) and Blackie (white steer)
 

Snider_Angus

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The Most important thing for steers here in Oklahoma is that they have to be able to get out in the ring and walk. you can have the best steer in the world body wise and fitting job wise but if you cant walk you WILL be last to calves that can travel well. AT OYE this year the judges were putting the less thick, less bodied calves that COULD WALK above the asskicking non walkers.
 

Jovid

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Snider_Angus":tkt3dt66 said:
The Most important thing for steers here in Oklahoma is that they have to be able to get out in the ring and walk. you can have the best steer in the world body wise and fitting job wise but if you cant walk you WILL be last to calves that can travel well. AT OYE this year the judges were putting the less thick, less bodied calves that COULD WALK above the asskicking non walkers.

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

:tiphat: for the judges

Wasn't that way at our county show. In fact grand and reserve steers were so over done they roached really bad when they walked and were short strided. I was told it didn't matter as they were steers not breeding animals.
 

CPL

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Jovid":6ns5sq82 said:
Snider_Angus":6ns5sq82 said:
The Most important thing for steers here in Oklahoma is that they have to be able to get out in the ring and walk. you can have the best steer in the world body wise and fitting job wise but if you cant walk you WILL be last to calves that can travel well. AT OYE this year the judges were putting the less thick, less bodied calves that COULD WALK above the asskicking non walkers.

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

:tiphat: for the judges

Wasn't that way at our county show. In fact grand and reserve steers were so over done they roached really bad when they walked and were short strided. I was told it didn't matter as they were steers not breeding animals.

If I'm a packer and I sell quality beef and a lot of it, those calves that are just structurally correct won't do any good for me. As long as a steer is good enough that he can get to the feed bunk, the water trough, etc. he will do fine. Last I knew steers were meant for meat production, when does structurally correctness affect meat quality? (extreme cases not included).

If you are seriously suggesting that packers should choose lower quality grade, smaller rib eyed calves to sell to the public as premium beef you don't quite understand the end goal. The public wants quality meat, and if you hand them a small steak with little marbling ( aka tough meat) they will not be happy and the excuse that he was more "structurally correct" will not hold water.

Now in a breeding class, whether its commerical heifers, gilts, ewes, bulls, boars, or rams structurally correctness is very important. However, in a market class it should be one of the last things considered.
 
A

Anonymous

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CPL":1azub1je said:
Jovid":1azub1je said:
Snider_Angus":1azub1je said:
The Most important thing for steers here in Oklahoma is that they have to be able to get out in the ring and walk. you can have the best steer in the world body wise and fitting job wise but if you cant walk you WILL be last to calves that can travel well. AT OYE this year the judges were putting the less thick, less bodied calves that COULD WALK above the asskicking non walkers.

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

:tiphat: for the judges

Wasn't that way at our county show. In fact grand and reserve steers were so over done they roached really bad when they walked and were short strided. I was told it didn't matter as they were steers not breeding animals.

If I'm a packer and I sell quality beef and a lot of it, those calves that are just structurally correct won't do any good for me. As long as a steer is good enough that he can get to the feed bunk, the water trough, etc. he will do fine. Last I knew steers were meant for meat production, when does structurally correctness affect meat quality? (extreme cases not included).

If you are seriously suggesting that packers should choose lower quality grade, smaller rib eyed calves to sell to the public as premium beef you don't quite understand the end goal. The public wants quality meat, and if you hand them a small steak with little marbling ( aka tough meat) they will not be happy and the excuse that he was more "structurally correct" will not hold water.

Now in a breeding class, whether its commerical heifers, gilts, ewes, bulls, boars, or rams structurally correctness is very important. However, in a market class it should be one of the last things considered.

What you're forgetting is those steers have sisters, which generally are being bred from. So, trying to breed from a female that has some meat on her, but can't walk, calve, be served etc, as well as having reduced longevity, just isn't practical.
It's very easy to say if they're just for eating what does it matter if they're not sound, but you have to consider they're all coming from a similar place and being bred for the same thing.
What an animal needs is structural soundness, carcase, muscle, capacity, milk, feet, and finish. And they need to finish as economically as possible.
But if the structure isn't there, they aren't going to be able to carry nearly as much muscle, carcase, finish, as a sound animal.
Let alone get out a calf that is an adequate freezer prospect.
 
A

Anonymous

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You've gotta breed 'em before you can feed 'em - a dead calf/cow won't make you much $$$
 

Keren

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The way I see it, there are two ways to judge a steer:

1) As a 'store' animal - I believe you guys would call it a prospect? As in, a young animal about to be started on feed.

2) As a 'fat' animal - at a terminal point - when the animal is already fed up, grown out and finished and ready to have its head cut off.

In the first case, if I'm judging steers then yes, structure is important. Because they need adequate structure to support their weight as they are fed out, and handle walking on concrete etc. Structure doesnt have to be perfect cos lets face it, they dont need to walk very far, but it does need to be adequate.

In the second case, structure in a steer doesnt mean a bleeding thing. The steer has demonstrated that his structure was adequate by still being alive and walkin around at the end of his feed out period. If I'm judging a terminal show, and all the steers manage to walk around the ring, well I dont care if the one I put in first place is cow hocked, post legged, knock kneed or whatever. If he has the best carcase in terms of the best muscle, correct finish etc. he will go to the top of the class, regardless of his structural flaws.
 

CPL

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Killala":17bnnpmg said:
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

:tiphat: for the judges

Wasn't that way at our county show. In fact grand and reserve steers were so over done they roached really bad when they walked and were short strided. I was told it didn't matter as they were steers not breeding animals.

If I'm a packer and I sell quality beef and a lot of it, those calves that are just structurally correct won't do any good for me. As long as a steer is good enough that he can get to the feed bunk, the water trough, etc. he will do fine. Last I knew steers were meant for meat production, when does structurally correctness affect meat quality? (extreme cases not included).

If you are seriously suggesting that packers should choose lower quality grade, smaller rib eyed calves to sell to the public as premium beef you don't quite understand the end goal. The public wants quality meat, and if you hand them a small steak with little marbling ( aka tough meat) they will not be happy and the excuse that he was more "structurally correct" will not hold water.

Now in a breeding class, whether its commerical heifers, gilts, ewes, bulls, boars, or rams structurally correctness is very important. However, in a market class it should be one of the last things considered.[/quote]

What you're forgetting is those steers have sisters, which generally are being bred from.[/quote]

Its not that I've forgot that, its that its not important. When you are asked to judge steers, you want to pick the ones that will be the most packer oriented. I have never been asked to place steers on how I thought their sisters would perform on the open range.
 
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brahma_show_girl

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Thanks everyone. Speaking of Structure the white calf seems to have a hitch in is walk. His back left leg at his pastern pops and seems like the joint hangs. I don't know if he hurt himself or if he has always been that way. I didn't notice it when I picked him out because I was having to look at him from a distance. I was wondering if there was a supplement I could feed to help his joints? Its just that one leg.

Oh and they have been names.
The Black one is Booger because he gets untied all the time.
The White one is Bean. When I picked him up my mom said he looked like a little Butter Bean.
 

grand chaser09

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calves look good. i'd like to see both of them when they're clipped all the way out. both look to be farily clean. good luck with them.
 

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