Murray Grey Hereford Cross

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puzzled in oregon

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I would like to know the pedigree of that Murray Grey bull.

I have been looking at bigger birthweight sires, but I have not purchased any yet. My cows are different sizes. A few are bigger and older; I think they would handle a bigger calf. Spectrum Farm - Corey has a frame score of 8 ...sounds like a monster. Bottlesford Kudos KPN K18 has a heavier birthweight and is still available in the USA. Kudos is sold out in other countries.
The Murray Greys are known for calving ease. But as some members of CT have stated you can lose that calving ease when you make out crosses to no-calving ease cows. My bull did not throw big calves, none of my other cows ever needed assistance calving from him. I blamed the increased calf side on the Hereford blood involved. That maybe unfair of me, but I was brought up Angus.
My parents quit the Hereford bulls after seeing to many dead cows and calves, not just theirs, but others were facing the same problems. As a kid I was horrified to see a dead cow and her dead calf being drug down the road behind a Willies Jeep.

As far as my bulls pedigree, I got no idea. I bought both of them(at different times) without papers. I am going to try calling the individual I bought my bulls from and I will ask him that question. My cousin ran one of his bulls that was purchased as a yearling for five years. He ran with a small group of cows that calved out in the hills, and in that time frame whether it was first calf heifers or mature cows they all raised a calf each year..
 

moses388

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The Murray Greys are known for calving ease. But as some members of CT have stated you can lose that calving ease when you make out crosses to no-calving ease cows. My bull did not throw big calves, none of my other cows ever needed assistance calving from him. I blamed the increased calf side on the Hereford blood involved. That maybe unfair of me, but I was brought up Angus.
My parents quit the Hereford bulls after seeing to many dead cows and calves, not just theirs, but others were facing the same problems. As a kid I was horrified to see a dead cow and her dead calf being drug down the road behind a Willies Jeep.

As far as my bulls pedigree, I got no idea. I bought both of them(at different times) without papers. I am going to try calling the individual I bought my bulls from and I will ask him that question. My cousin ran one of his bulls that was purchased as a yearling for five years. He ran with a small group of cows that calved out in the hills, and in that time frame whether it was first calf heifers or mature cows they all raised a calf each year..
It's true the Hereford x Murray Grey calf could be an outlier. CT members have taught me the only true calving-ease breed is Longhorn. Longhorn is the sire to use if cattle are in the middle of nowhere and no one will supervise calving.

Eagles Run Ranch lists Murray Grey sires. They also list if they are for cows, heifers, or both. I agree the Murray Grey breed usually sires lower birthweight calves than other breeds generally speaking. I think a close look at any breed will find some high birthweights and low birthweights.

I think Murray Greys are well known for their meat tenderness. Majority of US cattle will score a 7 or lower for meat tenderness, but multiple Murray Grey sires score a perfect 10. It is also my opinion that Herefords are known for high ribeye scores, and Angus are known for their marbling. Sometimes I see an Angus sire with a high ribeye score, but he also sires large birthweights.
 

puzzled in oregon

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It's true the Hereford x Murray Grey calf could be an outlier. CT members have taught me the only true calving-ease breed is Longhorn. Longhorn is the sire to use if cattle are in the middle of nowhere and no one will supervise calving.

Eagles Run Ranch lists Murray Grey sires. They also list if they are for cows, heifers, or both. I agree the Murray Grey breed usually sires lower birthweight calves than other breeds generally speaking. I think a close look at any breed will find some high birthweights and low birthweights.

I think Murray Greys are well known for their meat tenderness. Majority of US cattle will score a 7 or lower for meat tenderness, but multiple Murray Grey sires score a perfect 10. It is also my opinion that Herefords are known for high ribeye scores, and Angus are known for their marbling. Sometimes I see an Angus sire with a high ribeye score, but he also sires large birthweights.
That is interesting to know, I had not seen the listings that specified better choices for heifers or cows.

When I was working as a Brand Inspector, I went to an older gentleman's ranch to do the paperwork for an out of state sale of one of his Hereford bulls. This guy had always been a firm believer in the Hereford breed and had stayed with it through any and all problems that arose within the breed. He is who first commented to me about the Longhorns and the fact that with no one looking after them they either calved or did not survive, and thus calving issues were not passed on.

I personally want my cows to calve easily. I was looking through a friends AI catalog that listed Angus AI sires, and the one bull that I liked the looks of and impressed me the most with his birth weight of 65 pounds, had a weaning weight equal to the bulls with 80 or 90 lb. birth weights.
 

Warren Allison

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It's true the Hereford x Murray Grey calf could be an outlier. CT members have taught me the only true calving-ease breed is Longhorn. Longhorn is the sire to use if cattle are in the middle of nowhere and no one will supervise calving.
Or Corriente. Even more CE than Lh.
 

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