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Cowdirt

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ddg1263":1wu3zngn said:
If you are buying hay @ $75 plus feeding grain you will be wasting money.

Well when you are paying 1000 dollars a ton for fertilizer it does not take much to add up. I noticed a bunch of hay farmers buying cattle this past winter because no one would buy their hay, and they did not want to loose their crop so they bought some cows and fed out this winter. And I have seen a cattle farmer try to make it through the year with out hay because it was too expensive. The buzzards were circling their place this past year, and they looked extremely emancipated, body frame of 1. I harvested my hay this past year and even with no cost in my labor, I still had a big price in my hay costs. Times are hard for sure.

Everyone I know who is solvent is feeding hay and supplementing some all stock/pellet feed to carry cows through during the winter. Especially when you are trying to make sure your cattle get pregnant. I have found that if you get to cheap in some of your supplements, it will cost you in the long run. I don’t know maybe I am doing things all wrong, but I bet when all is added up my input cost will as efficient as anyone in this state. I just think times are bad, and that is what everyone is telling me.


If my pasture don't start growing soon, I may have to emancipate some of my cows. Bet the neighbors will love that. Couldn't resist just had to say this. ;-)
 

Brandonm22

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I don't mean to be harsh; but part of the reason the last few years were as strong as they were was that the border was shut to a lot of Canadian Cattle during much of that time creating artificially high prices. I hope that $1.30-$1.60/lb 550 lb calves will come back; but I would not base my business plan based on that hope. Historically anything above a $1 a lb is the high side of the cattle cycle. If you can't cover your cash costs (and frankly I don't give a rip about depreciation or the value of your own labor or what your ground would be worth if you rented it out) at ~90 cents a lb for your calf crop I question the viability of your program going forward.
 

Stocker Steve

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Brandonm22":2gkvn9al said:
I hope that $1.30-$1.60/lb 550 lb calves will come back; but I would not base my business plan based on that hope. Historically anything above a $1 a lb is the high side of the cattle cycle. If you can't cover your cash costs (and frankly I don't give a rip about depreciation or the value of your own labor or what your ground would be worth if you rented it out) at ~90 cents a lb for your calf crop I question the viability of your program going forward.

I bought 66 bred cows and heifers in November because no one wanted them. Sold the old cows, a man killer, and some fancy black heifers in January/February leaving 37 mostly Rwf to mob up later with the stockers. We have had a colder than normal winter and they are eating a lot of groceries.
I updated the 2009 cow/calf costs yesterday and projected a $46 cash/gross margin loss per head with 2008 hay prices. With the historically cheaper hay price and some stockpiling - - I projected about a $50 positive cash/ gross margin. I really like the cows I have left but many will be going to the the sales barn to be split unless things improve by late summer.
I would rather hunt more than haul hay for free. :banana:
 

ddg1263

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If my pasture don't start growing soon, I may have to emancipate some of my cows. Bet the neighbors will love that. Couldn't resist just had to say this. ;-)[/quote]

Man I do goof up a lot when I do not proof read! :tiphat: :banana: It should have read emanciated! :dunce:
 

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