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Imported beef.

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Douglas

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Most in the cattle industry oppose COOL. We import cheap cuts and export expensive cuts of beef. COOL violated our trade agreements and was ruled illegal by WTO. Not worth the cost. Retailers are free to label anything they want.

https://www.beefusa.org/ourviewscolumns ... ewsID=2942

Peel also says beef imports are heavily driven by the enormous market for ground beef in the US. Some 72% of beef imports are lean trimmings used primarily in ground beef and ground beef products. In 2016, ground beef consumption was estimated at 25 pounds per capita, making up 45% of total US retail beef consumption. Lean imported beef supplements domestic supplies of lean trimmings which are mixed with the fatty trimmings from fed cattle meet ground beef demand at home.

Peel explains without imported beef trimmings, a combination of alternate circumstances would impact the US beef industry.


1) Less ground beef would be produced, reducing the value of the nearly 150 pounds of fed trim from each carcass.

2) Roughly 10-15% of steers and heifers would need to be raised and slaughtered as non-fed beef for lean and would be valued roughly the same as cow carcasses.

3) Additional lean from fed carcasses could be ground rather than being used for whatever higher value it sometimes has.


http://www.beefproducer.com/marketing/b ... good-thing
 

Turkeybird

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I'm for COOL ! I don't want to eat meat or fish from anywhere else unless I know its origin
 
OP
T

True Grit Farms

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Douglas"[b:1u0jotik said:
]Most in the cattle industry oppose COOL.[/b] We import cheap cuts and export expensive cuts of beef. COOL violated our trade agreements and was ruled illegal by WTO. Not worth the cost. Retailers are free to label anything they want.

https://www.beefusa.org/ourviewscolumns ... ewsID=2942

Peel also says beef imports are heavily driven by the enormous market for ground beef in the US. Some 72% of beef imports are lean trimmings used primarily in ground beef and ground beef products. In 2016, ground beef consumption was estimated at 25 pounds per capita, making up 45% of total US retail beef consumption. Lean imported beef supplements domestic supplies of lean trimmings which are mixed with the fatty trimmings from fed cattle meet ground beef demand at home.

Peel explains without imported beef trimmings, a combination of alternate circumstances would impact the US beef industry.


1) Less ground beef would be produced, reducing the value of the nearly 150 pounds of fed trim from each carcass.

2) Roughly 10-15% of steers and heifers would need to be raised and slaughtered as non-fed beef for lean and would be valued roughly the same as cow carcasses.

3) Additional lean from fed carcasses could be ground rather than being used for whatever higher value it sometimes has.


http://www.beefproducer.com/marketing/b ... good-thing

Wrong, NCBA wants you to believe that. The packers and feedlots are the one's that oppose COOL, no label equals more $money by deception and fraud. The majority of Americans want to know where their food comes from. And the majority of countries that import US beef expect it to be raised in the US not a product of the US of A.
 

callmefence

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Douglas":1oxe2glm said:
Most in the cattle industry oppose COOL. We import cheap cuts and export expensive cuts of beef. COOL violated our trade agreements and was ruled illegal by WTO. Not worth the cost. Retailers are free to label anything they want.

https://www.beefusa.org/ourviewscolumns ... ewsID=2942

Peel also says beef imports are heavily driven by the enormous market for ground beef in the US. Some 72% of beef imports are lean trimmings used primarily in ground beef and ground beef products. In 2016, ground beef consumption was estimated at 25 pounds per capita, making up 45% of total US retail beef consumption. Lean imported beef supplements domestic supplies of lean trimmings which are mixed with the fatty trimmings from fed cattle meet ground beef demand at home.

Peel explains without imported beef trimmings, a combination of alternate circumstances would impact the US beef industry.


1) Less ground beef would be produced, reducing the value of the nearly 150 pounds of fed trim from each carcass.

2) Roughly 10-15% of steers and heifers would need to be raised and slaughtered as non-fed beef for lean and would be valued roughly the same as cow carcasses.

3) Additional lean from fed carcasses could be ground rather than being used for whatever higher value it sometimes has.


http://www.beefproducer.com/marketing/b ... good-thing

Put down the cool aid Doug... just back away.
 
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True Grit Farms

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Canada (161,288 mt, +14%) and Mexico (102,600 mt, +9%) ship primarily to the U.S.

The packers and feedlots can buy cheaper beef from those two countries and sell it as a product of the US of A. This is what's bad for the US cattlemen. It'll only be a matter of time before CWD, FMD or some other virus will affect the US export markets. My worries are more with the Mexican and Brazilian beef being sold as a product of the US.
 

Ky hills

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I am for COOL as well. As most that are involved in the cattle industry, be it cow/calf producers or back grounders, large or small, we are widely accepting of BQA practices and implement them, and I am certain that our ( USA ) raised cattle are raised and fed and processed with the safest and highest standards. I am sure that beef from Canada is a good product also. In years past I have AI bred some cows to Canadian Charolais bulls, with good results
To me the farther away from the source of production the harder it would be to maintain quality control, along with health issues, and practices that could affect those.
We have been selling vegetables at farmers market, and there are lots of folks that do very much care where there food comes from. There is often times a wide range of what is understood about our agricultural practices, which is why I think a lot of folks are sometimes mistrusting, a case in point could be the definition of product of or raised in.
 

Jogeephus

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I'm not for COOL. I'm not for any additional government regulation or new taxes for that matter. What would really help cattlemen is deregulation. Get the federal government out of local meat processing and let's give the states the authority to set the standards of in state butchering and sales of beef and lets go back to the way it used to be before the federal government got involved and "helped us" and put all the small butchers and processors out of business. Prior to their meddling we could slaughter and sell our animals locally without all the BS. This created local skilled jobs and the consumer actually had a choice. Anyone in favor of more regulation must have a higher degree of trust of the federal government than I do because I think the federal government has proven time and time again that they could screw up a wet dream and if you think that COOL will do what you think it will I think you must be delusional because the lobbyist will soon have us all working for the company store if we don't get our states' rights back when it comes to processing. Truegrit, consider your cattle probably have 2000 miles of freight on them before the meat reaches the consumer. Just think what you could do with the money saved from this if you could sell them locally without the BS.
 

Turkeybird

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How would you like to eat a big ole mess of crawfish or shrimp boil and some fried frog legs at a restraunt and be told after you ate that they all were raised in a sewer in China! Now do you get what I'm feelin
 

Jogeephus

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Turkeybird":1jap9do3 said:
How would you like to eat a big ole mess of crawfish or shrimp boil and some fried frog legs at a restraunt and be told after you ate that they all were raised in a sewer in China! Now do you get what I'm feelin

I follow what you are saying but it doesn't get in our food chain unless it is first approved by the USDA. Do you follow what I'm saying?

Give the states' their rights back to control what goes in the food supply within the state and you won't have this nonsense. When you concentrate power and give up state's rights to the federal government you are only making it easier for the lobbyist or the corrupt politicians to rig the game against the small producers because our voice isn't heard.

If I was afraid of Chinese frog legs I think I would have a better chance getting them banned from my state without the federal government.
 

callmefence

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Jogeephus":131fjt51 said:
Turkeybird":131fjt51 said:
How would you like to eat a big ole mess of crawfish or shrimp boil and some fried frog legs at a restraunt and be told after you ate that they all were raised in a sewer in China! Now do you get what I'm feelin

I follow what you are saying but it doesn't get in our food chain unless it is first approved by the USDA. Do you follow what I'm saying?

Give the states' their rights back to control what goes in the food supply within the state and you won't have this nonsense. When you concentrate power and give up state's rights to the federal government you are only making it easier for the lobbyist or the corrupt politicians to rig the game against the small producers because our voice isn't heard.

If I was afraid of Chinese frog legs I think I would have a better chance getting them banned from my state without the federal government.

I understand Jo,s point. It would be better if everything was kept small and local. Then you know what your getting without the government telling you. problem is people with the exception of a very few are not willing to endure the sacrifice it would take to get back to that level.
The same way I believe in hiring local American born labor, often to the point of my own disadvantage. It's like closing the gate after the cows are already out.
 

Ky hills

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I see Jo's point as well, but it is unlikely that any control would be ceded over to individual states at this time in history. I would like to see our producers be able to market meat direct to consumers easier, and more cost effective. My support of COOL is two fold, with out it I am concerned that it could lead to mass importation of beef, both processed and on the hoof, and that in turn could have devastating effects on our local demand and increase health concerns for our livestock. I agree that it would be easier to have our voices heard on a state level than at the national level.
 

Jogeephus

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Ky hills":26cgnqoe said:
I see Jo's point as well, but it is unlikely that any control would be ceded over to individual states at this time in history. I would like to see our producers be able to market meat direct to consumers easier, and more cost effective. My support of COOL is two fold, with out it I am concerned that it could lead to mass importation of beef, both processed and on the hoof, and that in turn could have devastating effects on our local demand and increase health concerns for our livestock. I agree that it would be easier to have our voices heard on a state level than at the national level.

There is actually legislation in the works to change this and give this authority back to the states. Probably won't get to far because the meat monopoly lobbyists will fight this tooth and nail on the grounds of meat safety. Personally, I have no problem with imports because I believe quality will always sell and I seriously doubt those who care more about price than quality give a hoot on whether their meat comes from the USA or Uganda. I think Walmart showed us that. I also don't mind the USDA having a part in food inspection but I believe their role should only be when it comes to interstate or international sales.

As for immigration, the meat lobbyists are one of the strong supporters for open borders because they rely so heavily on immigrant labor to work in their huge slaughterhouses so much so most all the meat lines are now facing east to appease the muslims. The irony here is that WE, through the mandatory beef checkoff funds ultimately fund this very lobby that clearly goes against our very beliefs and interests.

The big question here is why should the USDA have any say on what we do with our beef when its sold to our neighbors in our local community? I think most of us have enough sense to know if our neighbor runs a good sanitary operation or not and we don't need some gov't stamp to tell us they are conscientious and do a good job. Heck, I'm sure we all know of a restaurant or greasy spoon in our community that has the gov't stamp yet we all know it is nasty and and unfit to eat at. So we don't. And soon, capitalism will put them out of business. However, we are deprived of this knowledge by the federal government because the game is rigged to the large meat processing monopoly and they are given the luxury of anonymity through their large size.

If you look at this historically you can see how a lot of this came about by Sinclair's book The Jungle, where he talked about the plight of the workers in these big meat packing facilities. He spoke of the unsanitary conditions in these plants but what by his own admission his main emphasis was that of the plight of the worker and how they were being used. The public was outraged and legislation was passed to correct this. Upton later admitted that his message fell on deaf ears because the legislation passed did nothing to address the problem he saw and it penalized the good parts of the industry. In other words, it put the small local butchers out of business.

These local butchers created skilled jobs. They were family businesses and unlike a mega-processor who hires someone to make a single cut on a carcass the employees here had to know how to process the whole animal into cuts of beef. These people were highly trained and this craft was essentially an art and people made careers of it. Even more, you knew these people and got to look them in the eye when buying their meat. In my small town we had three butchers, each competing against the other and each had at least six full time employees. You could carry a calf to one of them and they would either process the whole thing for you or you could do it on shares and they would sell their share to the public or you could just sell them the whole calf and there was never any re-calls on millions of pounds of meat like we see today.

Just think about how this could effect your bottom line of your operation. Just say you took one calf and ground the whole thing into burger and were able to sell it without the expense of the unnecessary bureaucracy. Sold as ground, one calf would fetch you around $2000 and this wouldn't include the money you'd receive from the fifth quarter. And this doesn't even factor in the fact that your friends and neighbors would be getting some of the best beef they've ever had and this in itself would negate any concerns we might have with imported beef because people wouldn't want imported because they would know the difference. As it is, very few people truly know the difference.

The million dollar question is, why are we not allowed to do this when all it would do is good for our local community and for our operations? Clearly, its not about food safety so its got to be about something else.
 

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