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Nesikep

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So y'all remember Yotta? The heifer that lost her calf early this spring, couple weeks before she was due? That was Feb 7th.
Mar 13th she was in heat and I brought her to the bull.. she's been dry all summer.

This pic is from June 15th



And look at her udder today ... It's FULL???
I'll save you the math, it's 177 days.




No flabby butt to speak of
 

Bright Raven

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I have a lot of clovers. I have had heifers begin udder development half way through pregnancy. Vet says it could be phytoestrogens. Does not affect cows as much as heifers.
 

Bright Raven

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I think Yotta has a hormonal malfunction. Hormonal systems do foul up. Hopefully, it causes not harm.
 

ez14.

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Seen a brown swiss heifer that was open (I can guarantee she was open) that had her udder fill up. Had the Vet check her out while she was out for some other things the Vet milked her out and said don't worry about it she's fine and sure enough her udder didn't fill up again until it was supposed to and she was fine. So I don't really know what the deal was because the Vet didn't say a lot about it but she was fine
 
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Nesikep

Nesikep

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Silver":25xuycyt said:
Are you sure she isn't feeding a calf? Sometimes they come back to their milk.
I tried to have her adopt the orphan and no way no how was she going to have any of that.. would be really surprising if she changed her mind!
 

ez14.

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Silver":1mkbybto said:
Are you sure she isn't feeding a calf? Sometimes they come back to their milk.
She's been dry quite awhile now so I'd think that is rather unlikely but maybe
 

ez14.

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Aaron":evdn0mog said:
Three options. Abortion, being currently nursed or mastitis.
Her udder looks to even to be mastitis. Mastitis usually effects some quarters more then overs giving a very uneven look to the udder. Her udder looks healthy
 
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Nesikep

Nesikep

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checked on her this morning, she was laying down, had a little bit of clear discharge.. I'll just keep watching her
 

Aaron

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Nesikep":2rmjxg8f said:
Udder feels good, just full.. doesn't kick if I touch it.

I'd be pulling on each tit and seeing what comes out. I've dealt with enough mastitis to know that looking good and feeling good doesn't mean squat.

"The most common way to detect clinical mastitis is stripping a few squirts of milk into a strip cup at the beginning of milking to check for abnormalities such as clots and flakes.

Visual observation and palpating the udder for signs of inflammation can also help identify clinical mastitis but should not substitute for stripping."
 
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Nesikep

Nesikep

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Aaron":s8uxi78y said:
Nesikep":s8uxi78y said:
Udder feels good, just full.. doesn't kick if I touch it.

I'd be pulling on each tit and seeing what comes out. I've dealt with enough mastitis to know that looking good and feeling good doesn't mean squat.

"The most common way to detect clinical mastitis is stripping a few squirts of milk into a strip cup at the beginning of milking to check for abnormalities such as clots and flakes.

Visual observation and palpating the udder for signs of inflammation can also help identify clinical mastitis but should not substitute for stripping."
did that today, it's clean milk (doesn't look like colostrum, of course it's not like she built up colostrum for a long time before anyhow)
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Just a note of interest. You should NEVER open a teat prior to calving. You remove the natural "plug", therefore opening up the possibility of bacteria getting into the udder.
If you have a teat dip that is colored, or take a teat dip & add food coloring (like blue). Dip her teats and you will know if a calf sucks her (blue teats will get cleaned off). Before cameras in my calving pens, I would do that if I was in doubt that the newborn sucked.
 

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