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hoof information

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Double R Ranch

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Hey everyone,
I need information on trimming cattle feet. I have search the internet but haven't come up with much. A couple of my older angus need there hooves trimmed. I am a retired horse farrier so I understand the hoof pretty well. Can anyone guide me in the right direction so I can care for my cattle properly.
Thanks,
Double R
 

edrsimms

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If you are a farrier, I think you can handle it --if you look underneath you can see where the "quick" begins. If not get your hoof knife and scape the bottom a bit then you can see it well.
If I have a cow that needs trimming we just get out the nippers and go to it -- good easy job

Ed
 

alacattleman

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i use prunin' shears myself, dont even have too raise the hoof are wrestle with the cow... the blades are hooked so i run one down under the tip and the other over and nip the long handle help keep you back away and give plenty of leverage
 

jerry27150

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trim the long toes back as far as a normal cows foot but don't go far enough to get into tender area,you will know if they start feeling it. then trim off front part of bottom leaving the outside shell to carry most of their weight. try not to get in too deep here either. if too bad take what you can this time & try again after a few weeks.
 

Double R Ranch

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user1,
If I got rid of every animal that had a minor fixable problem i'd be out of business. Thank you for your response but that wasn't the answer I was looking for.

Ed,
Thank you for your response. So what your telling me is they are set up exactly like a horses hoof just "2" per leg. The inside is the same. So what am I looking for for a properly trimmed hoof"s". These are old cattle that are still producing great offspring but are becoming lame with cracks and over grown toes. I have seen a couple books but they are expensive and im not willing to pay for a book that talked a minute about trimming and the rest is care and feeding of cattle.
I greatly appreciate your reply and hope you can provide me with more info.
Thanks again,
Double R
 

Double R Ranch

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jerry27150":ow4sj43e said:
trim the long toes back as far as a normal cows foot but don't go far enough to get into tender area,you will know if they start feeling it. then trim off front part of bottom leaving the outside shell to carry most of their weight. try not to get in too deep here either. if too bad take what you can this time & try again after a few weeks.

Thank you! This is the info im looking for. The link that you posted Dun is also what I am looking for. Thanks. I'll give it a go this weekend. If anyone has more links or info I am very interested and greatful for getting it.
Double R
 

SRBeef

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If cows are getting exercise up and down hills, etc with some rock how common is it to need hoof trimming? Looking at mine I see a couple older cows with the hooves a bit longer in front than the others but doesn't look excessive and there is no splitting. Is hoof trimming normally/always required on Herefords?
 

dun

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SRBeef":29hto5td said:
If cows are getting exercise up and down hills, etc with some rock how common is it to need hoof trimming? Looking at mine I see a couple older cows with the hooves a bit longer in front than the others but doesn't look excessive and there is no splitting. Is hoof trimming normally/always required on Herefords?
Hoof trimming isn;t normally required of any cows except those in a dairy. If it's a grazing dairy they don;t even need trimming
 

SRBeef

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dun":1dotr5bh said:
SRBeef":1dotr5bh said:
If cows are getting exercise up and down hills, etc with some rock how common is it to need hoof trimming? Looking at mine I see a couple older cows with the hooves a bit longer in front than the others but doesn't look excessive and there is no splitting. Is hoof trimming normally/always required on Herefords?
Hoof trimming isn;t normally required of any cows except those in a dairy. If it's a grazing dairy they don;t even need trimming

Thank you Dun.

Jim
 

SixBucksADay

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It's not quite like a horses foot x2. When trimming horses, the heal looks invitingly easy to trim, but you better think twice. If you have shod many horses you know what I mean. On a cow the heel doesn't usually present much to trim and usually doesn't need it. Unless there has been injury or a genetic problem, you probably won't trim the heels at all. A cows toes will be pretty unforgiving if you trim the heel when it doesn't need it. You will make her sore for awhile. The far and large majority will be taken off the toes to the quarters of the outside of each toe. On the inside of the toes, I've rarely trimmed more than the tip of the toes and a little towards the quarters to keep them from rubbing together. In most cases only the toes need knocking off and I do it with cow standing flat footed, never getting near the quarters. On long toed cows you wil be taking quite a bit right off the end of the toes. If the cow has foundered, received an injury, or has a genetic defect causing excessive heal growth, then you have a problem. The heel will actually grow out and fold under, harboring manure and dirt against the sole and it will abcess. In these cases you have to tie the foot back and cut the flap of hoof wall back to the point it is not being stepped on. If you quick a cow at the toe and draw some blood, it's not good, but it's not like a horse. For a horse it's a big oh [email protected] moment and probably alot of doctoring. I've drawn blood on many cows and never had a problem, not even soreness. I wouldn't recommend doing it intentionally and I don't, but cows are more forgiving that way. If you get a chance, oxen shoes are neat to look at. They cover a little on the inside of each toe and then the outide of each toe completely. It's almost like a horseshoe cut in half at the toe. Oxen shoes are only nailed on the outside of each toe. It's fascinating if you done alot of farriers work.
 

Double R Ranch

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SRBeef":2cwrpksx said:
If cows are getting exercise up and down hills, etc with some rock how common is it to need hoof trimming? Looking at mine I see a couple older cows with the hooves a bit longer in front than the others but doesn't look excessive and there is no splitting. Is hoof trimming normally/always required on Herefords?

The angus cows we are having a problem with are old and/or we also have a couple of young ones that have been on soft ground/pens for quite some time. Then when they get turned out on hard ground they are to long and start breaking and crippling up. They stay in one place in the pasture and start getting thin. If we trim there feet they are instantly back out n grazing. I am wanting to skip the crippling/breaking stage and go right for shortening the feet and turning them out.
Double R
 
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