• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Halter breaking

showing71

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2009
Messages
688
Reaction score
0
You might get more responses in the Show topic, but I'll tell you what I do most of the time here:

I run the calf/calves through the chute and put halters on them in the a.m. Then I put them in a small pen with hay and water. They drag the lead on the halters all day, then in the evening I take the halters off and put them back in their original pen. I do this for approx. 3 days.
After that, I will continue to put halters on them, then grab the lead and hold on to them or wrap the lead around a sturdy post. I let them get used to the pressure from the lead, and if they calm down, I slowly walk to the head and begin rubbing them. After this, I take halters off, but keep them in the small pen for the rest of the day.
After they get used to this idea, I then will begin tying them up and brush or rub on them. If they don't jump around too much, I will leave them tied for a little while. As they get more and more accustomed to the halter, I will begin leading them around and work on haltering them without running them through the chute and having them tied for longer periods of time.

Depending on the calf, what I do varies from this time wise. If they are really wild, the process takes longer, but I can usually have a calf halter broke and leading decently and possibly washed in 7 days or so. Make sure you don't leave the calf alone while tied up until he/she stands quietly without pulling because they can hurt themselves.
 

grannysoo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Messages
4,813
Reaction score
0
Location
The Briar Patch
It's been a long time since I had show cattle, but we would place the halter on them and tie them to a lightpole or big cornerpost, with about 12" of slack in the rope. We would let them fight them until they would not fight anymore. After that, they knew that the halter/lead rope was their master.

Probably do things differently now...
 

UncleLA

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
91
Reaction score
0
Location
Louisiana
I had trouble viewing videos the first few times also.
I just tried again, and it didn't work.
For some reason, when I'm on my work computer, I can't get the videos to work; however, when I am on my home computer, it works.
I'm not a computer guru, so don't ask me why.
It is a great video once you get it to work.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
UncleLA":ni9bs5va said:
I had trouble viewing videos the first few times also.
I just tried again, and it didn't work.
For some reason, when I'm on my work computer, I can't get the videos to work; however, when I am on my home computer, it works.
I'm not a computer guru, so don't ask me why.
It is a great video once you get it to work.

Your work computer either doesn;t have the required software or they have a filter (firewall) on it to prevent videos.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
May sound like a stupid question but why do you want to halter break them?
 

xbred

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
640
Reaction score
0
Location
southwest mississippi
i've never halter broke a calf before, but i've got a new grandson (1 mth. old) and if is start halter breaking now, by the time he is 10 i'll have him one broke for him to show in FFA..can't wait..
 

aussie_cowgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,228
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Australia
Haha, excited Grandparent much?

Look there are 101 ways to break in cattle and after you have done it for a while you'll alter the way you do it and come up with your own individual way. A simple way to do it, and how I first learnt to do it was to put the animal through the crush and into the chute and put a halter in it (we use hackamores but plenty of people use regular rope halters). Make sure you have a long rope on the animal because when you let him out he is going to run, and make sure the yard is medium-small size. It's better to have someone else there so when you let him out you can pull the rope around a post with someone pushing him up from behind and tie it with a quick release knot. Some people leave them like this for a while but we just started either bagging (tie a hessian/feed bag over a broom and rub them all over) or just getting a soft brush and start brushing. Obviously we refrain from the back legs until they have quietened down and sometimes I think bagging first is a good idea, you rub them it all over it's body until they stop kicking and what not. Once they can be brushed all over easily you can try and teach them to lead. A nose clip is a good idea, the earlier they learn about it the better but it isn't a brake, its just a safety device. Make sure you never let them go otherwise they will learn that they CAN break away. Work on voice commands, say walk on (or what ever you want) and pull him to walk, and say woah (or again what ever you want) and stop them until they have learnt this. Then you go onto teaching them to stand, and wash them and blow dry.

But as I say this is one of 101 ways and by the time your grandy is 10 you will be a pro. Oh also on another note, I have found that weaning age is the best time to break in. They're sad and they are more likely to bond and respond to a person.
 

showing71

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2009
Messages
688
Reaction score
0
aussie_cowgirl":3usohsd7 said:
Oh also on another note, I have found that weaning age is the best time to break in. They're sad and they are more likely to bond and respond to a person.
Really? I have a helluva time with them then. Last time I broke right after weaning, they were all psycho and out of 6 calves I ended up only getting 2 broke well enough to show (and I tried everything from a donkey to a hot shot). I like doing it 6 weeks before they show if they're still on the cow (because they don't figure out how to be stubborn yet and not lead) or 2 months after weaning.
 

aussie_cowgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,228
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Australia
Yeah I have always found that younger calves are absolute [email protected]#% head's to work with. I always found maybe a few weeks after weaning they respond best. But maybe it's because I'm used to that age that I find it easy. :???:
 

Keren

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2006
Messages
3,415
Reaction score
0
Location
My little patch of earth, Perth, WA, Australia
I've always found calves 10 - 12 mths easiest to break. They have more brains then.

I hate breaking the 6 mth old heifers for the baby class at the royals ... not enough brains to save a life between the lot of em!
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
11,509
Reaction score
40
Location
Central Upstate New York
I saw the "clip" on RFD - just thought I would check it out.
I'm 5'2", 125# - and I do all the halter breaking. So - I do it slowly. And I prefer SMALLER THE BETTER! Although, I am working with a Junior yearling & Sr Yearling & a fall calf. The 2 yearlings were both taught to tie and that's about all. Next, I need to pull in the heifer & bull calves.
I put them in a pen during the day. Get them used to me walking around them, feeding them, cleaning pens. I put a rope halter on them with a long lead. The calves get turned out with Mom during night. After a few days, I quietly tie a 2nd rope on the end of their lead in a small pen & scratch with a showstick, letting them go in circles. When they stop (and they DO have a "safety" spot they always seem to stand still), I work on getting my hands on them. I will pull on the lead & get them to turn their heads towards me & loosen up. Finally, I will "ask" them to take a step with a little pressure on the lead. When they take 1 step, I loosen the lead. After I feel confident that they respect the halter & I can "hold" them, I will tie them for their feeding. Next time, I tie them at one end of the pen with their food at the other end. I walk them to their feed & tie them there. This works really well. Within a week I can tie them, brush them & walk them to another pen for their feed.
I also work at being able to walk up to their face & scratch them & rearrange the halter, so that after a few days, I can take the halter off & put it on in the middle of a pen. I NEVER put their halter on and immediately tie them up. That teaches them to avoid letting you put it on. Later, when they are "pros" and like being handled, I will just walk in & put their halter on & tie them up. You don't want them to think the halter is a punishment.
 

Latest posts

Top